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Pipe clamp "faces" why so small?

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Forum topic by Dwain posted 12-22-2017 03:31 PM 535 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Dwain

509 posts in 3767 days


12-22-2017 03:31 PM

Topic tags/keywords: clamps pipe clamps

I have many pipe clamps, use them frequently, and am happy with them. I know, they are heavy. That doesn’t bother me too much, but what I was wondering is if there were a way to increase the “face” size, the clamping face of pipe clamps. I know, it would have been done, but the weight becomes an issue. Still, anyone out there jerryrig something to increase the face size while maintaining consistent clamping pressure across the face?

I would love to see solutions, if they are out there!

Thanks!

-- When you earnestly believe you can compensate for a lack of skill by doubling your efforts, there is no end to what you CAN'T do


12 replies so far

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

5568 posts in 2721 days


#1 posted 12-22-2017 03:50 PM

I don’t have any pipe clamp mods to recommend, but parallel clamps would certainly work. I like Bessey “H” style pipe clamps for panel glueups, and Bessey K body parallel clamps for carcass assemblies.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

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bondogaposis

4611 posts in 2259 days


#2 posted 12-22-2017 03:59 PM

Increasing the face size reduces the pressure your clamp is capable of, just by spreading the force over more square inches. So it is a compromise but you can surely add wood pads to the clamp jaws.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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Dwain

509 posts in 3767 days


#3 posted 12-22-2017 04:02 PM

Thanks pintodeluxe, I love the parallel clamps, just have a hard time with the investment. Bondo, thanks for the information on the information. I get it now. I always thought it was a weight issue.

-- When you earnestly believe you can compensate for a lack of skill by doubling your efforts, there is no end to what you CAN'T do

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cabmaker

1696 posts in 2716 days


#4 posted 12-22-2017 04:05 PM

I have….and still use pipe clamps for more than forty years and have never had a need for more surface area…..WHATS REALLY GOING ON ?

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splintergroup

1879 posts in 1130 days


#5 posted 12-22-2017 04:07 PM

Yep, wood pads. I just use some double-sided tape to hold them in place but you could make some that have a hole for the pipe and slide along with the heads.

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Redoak49

3077 posts in 1896 days


#6 posted 12-22-2017 04:11 PM

I also made wood pads out of a softer wood like pine to prevent denoting of my project.

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Gene Howe

10137 posts in 3336 days


#7 posted 12-22-2017 04:26 PM

Dwain, I was more concerned with stability but my solution also makes for a wider face.
For Jorgensen style, 3/4” pipe clamps, I cut 3/4” MDF triangles 2” wide at the top, 5” long and 3” wide at the bottom. Drilled a 7/8” hole for the pipe. On mine, there are two small holes for screws on each clamp head and tail piece. Used those to secure the MDF to the clamp.
I’ve used these clamps and pads for several years and, they still do the job.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

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Loren

9970 posts in 3555 days


#8 posted 12-22-2017 04:28 PM

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pintodeluxe

5568 posts in 2721 days


#9 posted 12-22-2017 04:34 PM

These are the ones I use, and frequently recommend. They provide a good elevated surface for panel clamping, and even the 1/2” pipe versions are quite stout. Maybe the clamping surface is bigger than other pipe clamps? Not sure. The best part is they are dirt cheap and readily available.

They include nice rubber pads that always seem to stay put.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

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Kazooman

938 posts in 1860 days


#10 posted 12-22-2017 05:16 PM



I also made wood pads out of a softer wood like pine to prevent denoting of my project.

- Redoak49

Similar idea here. I got a sheet of cork (a bit over a sixteenth thick) at a craft store and glued it like veneer to some 3/4 “ plywood. Cut it into various size blocks to use with all sorts of clamps. They help spread the pressure and really protect the work piece. I have some that are about 2” x 12” that I use in the jaws of my vise when I need extra protection.

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bilyo

125 posts in 1010 days


#11 posted 12-23-2017 08:20 PM

I also use wood pads made of what ever I have on hand. I cut them only slightly larger than the pipe clamp casting face and glue them on with epoxy. Occasionally one will break off and i just glue it back on or make a new one. When gluing them on I apply the glue and the wood pads and then tighten the clamp to something square until the glue has cured. This fixes the pads in proper alignment for future use.

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Carloz

1147 posts in 499 days


#12 posted 12-23-2017 09:15 PM



Increasing the face size reduces the pressure your clamp is capable of, just by spreading the force over more square inches. So it is a compromise but you can surely add wood pads to the clamp jaws.

- bondogaposis


Say that this was a joke, pleae.

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