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Forum topic by billdabilder posted 12-21-2017 12:55 PM 584 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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billdabilder

14 posts in 358 days


12-21-2017 12:55 PM

I want to make some folding luggage racks. I’m thinking the legs would be 2” x 3/4 to 15/16” x 30-31” long. My question is what hardwood to chose for the most strength at the most reasonable cost. Would use that also for the cross pieces. Any thoughts. Has anyone made these?


19 replies so far

View jerryminer's profile

jerryminer

944 posts in 1639 days


#1 posted 12-21-2017 09:55 PM

I have the same answer as in the other forum where you asked this:

Any hardwood. Most affordable will be whatever is low priced in your area.

One suggestion: Ash—an under-appreciated species, IMHO; strong (proven in baseball bats and snowshoes) and relatively low cost (in my area).

-- Jerry, making sawdust professionally since 1976

View wuddoc's profile

wuddoc

319 posts in 3915 days


#2 posted 12-21-2017 10:35 PM

Woodcraft may still have a drawing available of an old Furniture Design, Inc. luggage rack FD-212. Normally his drawings suggested wood species and are quite detailed.

FD-212

-- Wuddoc

View billdabilder's profile

billdabilder

14 posts in 358 days


#3 posted 12-22-2017 06:52 PM

Thanks for those ideas. I had thought of ash for those reasons. I’m on the west coast and not sure about availability of ash. There are two hardwood suppliers in this end of Oregon that have many exotics. Will check them out for ash. For the purposes of this project I’m curious if a high ranking on the hardness (Janko?) scale also means high tensile strength. Seems a wood could be hard, but also brittle and wouldn’t take kindly to “bending” forces. I know they have a lot of white oak, and it’s a bit higher than ash in hardness. I’ll check that Woodcraft site too. Thanks.

View Loren's profile

Loren

10477 posts in 3845 days


#4 posted 12-22-2017 07:07 PM

I’m in California and ash is not appreciably
cheaper than oak here in my experience.
I used to go to a place that had ash “shorts”
sawn from the butt of the tree.

I like ash a little better than oak. It’s comparably
durable but I find it a little more pleasant to
work with and I like the color and grain.

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1481 posts in 360 days


#5 posted 12-22-2017 08:08 PM

Bilder – how fancy and detailed do you want to go ?

an approach to the decorative side – as well as super strong,
would be to cut a whole passel of 1/8” x 3/4” strips of wood
and laminate them together into the shape that Doc suggested.

build a simple compression caul mold to fabricate the legs.
order some leather straps off the internet and you will have
a very nice and completely unique piece of furniture that nobody else has. (if that is your goal).

-- I started out with nothing in life ~ and still have most of it left.

View billdabilder's profile

billdabilder

14 posts in 358 days


#6 posted 12-22-2017 08:11 PM

I’m leaning toward ash, if I can find it. Bows, snowshoes and bats seem to indicate good tensile strength. Altho I think some boats use white oak. Anyone know of a good )or great) source for webbing?

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Carloz

1147 posts in 789 days


#7 posted 12-22-2017 08:26 PM


I have the same answer as in the other forum where you asked this:

Any hardwood.

- jerryminer

In fact unless OP wants a dirty quick hack of cutting the shape on a bandsaw instead of bending them there is only one suitable wood – Oak.

View billdabilder's profile

billdabilder

14 posts in 358 days


#8 posted 12-22-2017 08:45 PM

Well at least I have it narrowed down to two – oak or ash. Depends on availibililty and cost. If it’s a tossup maybe I’ll do some of each. On the band saw. Did some bent lamination to make a demilune table. Not seeing that here.

View jbay's profile (online now)

jbay

2859 posts in 1097 days


#9 posted 12-22-2017 09:11 PM

I would use what ever species you like.
Get wide enough boards to cut the shape using either with a band saw or even a jig saw.
Call it done.
If your going to laminate pieces and bend them your going to see end grain on the faces. yuk
Just my opinion

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John Smith

1481 posts in 360 days


#10 posted 12-22-2017 09:26 PM

just curious – - – you keep mentioning the cost of the materials as being an issue
as well as asking the members to help you find a source for cheap wood and strapping.
also – how many are you going to make ?
are these for your own personal use or gifts or to sell on E-Bay ?
just wondering here

-- I started out with nothing in life ~ and still have most of it left.

View billdabilder's profile

billdabilder

14 posts in 358 days


#11 posted 12-23-2017 04:57 PM

Good points, John. Regarding the bent lamination idea, as I said, I have done that to achieve the curved front of a demilune table. The guy who taught me makes fabulous chairs and other items using it. I intend to use it more in the future. From the standpoint of time and cost, I think I’ll do the first one(s) on the band saw.

You’re onto something with your second question. I want two for our home. I have relatives in the area who could really use one or two, which I would gladly gift to them (maybe one, and if they wanted another, maybe ask for something to cover materials). After that, IF all was going well, I might market them locally. But that becomes WORK, and eats up valuable time that I couldn’t devote to other woodworking projects that I’d like to do.

Mainly my original post was to try to find the type of hardwood that would be best suited to take the stress at that fulcrum point.

View Carloz's profile

Carloz

1147 posts in 789 days


#12 posted 12-23-2017 06:02 PM

i do not think you know how bent lamination works:


I would use what ever species you like.
Get wide enough boards to cut the shape using either with a band saw or even a jig saw.
Call it done.
If your going to laminate pieces and bend them your going to see end grain on the faces. yuk
Just my opinion

- jbay


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billdabilder

14 posts in 358 days


#13 posted 12-23-2017 06:12 PM

Agree with Carloz. Unless you were using a thin (1/16 or 3/32) plywood as the laminate, you would not see end grain. Laminating thin solid pieces shows long grain.

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jbay

2859 posts in 1097 days


#14 posted 12-24-2017 01:03 AM

Sorry, I didn’t mean the end grain, my mistake.
I meant that you will see all the edges glued together instead of a solid face.

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billdabilder

14 posts in 358 days


#15 posted 12-24-2017 06:02 AM

I kinda thought we were talking about 2 different things. Have merry Christams. Thanks to all for the advice.

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