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Over Sanding Plywood Butt Joint - Uneven Stain

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Forum topic by FredT posted 03-10-2011 05:49 PM 2406 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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FredT

17 posts in 2094 days


03-10-2011 05:49 PM

Topic tags/keywords: sanding finishing veneering

I just refaced some of my cabinets at the house and was trying to be very careful not to over sand, but apparently I did in some areas and now the stain won’t take very well. The joints appear to be lighter. As of now I have tried to blend the joint by spraying over to try and blend the unevenness. Would adding a little Farmwood wood filler help to absorb more stain in those areas and of course not sanding help any? Any suggestions…?


10 replies so far

View cabmaker's profile

cabmaker

1506 posts in 2269 days


#1 posted 03-10-2011 11:56 PM

Fred, sorry to hear your dilema. You are not the first to experiance this . I know its too late now but I would never use finer than 120 grit in that situation. Too many unknowns to give you a good way out on this. What did you stain with ? Have you tried to give it a quick sanding with coarser grit ? You may have already gone too far. If you used an oil stain (wiping stain) you may want to apply liberally on affected area then sand with 220 by hand or as you mentioned simply fog over it with spray and lapp into the remaining field areas moving a little faster. I do hope you used an oil stain and not a water or laquer based stain.BTW what I meant above is too sand the stain in shortley after you have applied liberally. Good luck with it and keep us posted.

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FredT

17 posts in 2094 days


#2 posted 03-11-2011 01:14 AM

Thank you so much for replying. I sanded the face front with 220 grit initially and I am using a Minwax english chestnut oil stain product which is not particularly my favorite product, but it matched closest to some existing color. Then again I can’t blame the stain here. I fogged over, but in order to match closely it seems to cake up and that isn’t gonna help any. I blended it pretty well, but now I am concerned with the solvents in the polyurethane (Sherwin William’s Wood Classics) causing a run when applied. I am going to try the sanding method you suggested. Thanks again.

View Sawkerf's profile

Sawkerf

1730 posts in 2529 days


#3 posted 03-11-2011 02:22 AM

I wouldn’t sand any more than you already have – it ain’t gonna get better. I’ve hidden minor sand thrus with colored pencils from an artist supply store. You can usually find a good color match.

-- Adversity doesn't build character...................it reveals it.

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FredT

17 posts in 2094 days


#4 posted 03-11-2011 02:43 AM

Thank you Sawkerf…... Never heard that before and particular brand color pencil…

View woody57's profile

woody57

647 posts in 2887 days


#5 posted 03-11-2011 02:46 AM

Yeah, I’ve done this before too. I have used touch up markers which are made to cover up scratches on furniture after the movers are done with it. Heck I’ve even used paint that is close to the stain color. The trick is you have to blend it in so you have a very gradual shade difference. Use a rag with a little mineral spirits and rub it out. Good luck.

-- Emmett, from Georgia

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Sawkerf

1730 posts in 2529 days


#6 posted 03-11-2011 06:26 AM

I don’t remember the brand, but it shouldn’t matter as long as the color is right.

-- Adversity doesn't build character...................it reveals it.

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FredT

17 posts in 2094 days


#7 posted 03-11-2011 06:52 AM

I tried the sanding method, but unfortunately it just didn’t work out. Gonna move on to blend with some sort of other medium other than stain to hopefully blend. What a mess! Lesson definitely learned!

View HokieMojo's profile

HokieMojo

2103 posts in 3188 days


#8 posted 03-11-2011 07:11 AM

if you can experiment on a hidden section, you might want to try using minwax polyshades. it is a pigmented polyuerethane. since it sits on top of the wood, it doesn’t need to absorb evenly. I had VERY mixed results with it, but it might be worth a shot.

View FredT's profile

FredT

17 posts in 2094 days


#9 posted 03-11-2011 05:44 PM

Thank you for the suggestion HokieMojo, but there is no match of polyshades to the current stain I am using.

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FredT

17 posts in 2094 days


#10 posted 03-11-2011 05:47 PM

I am gonna try oil pastels that I borrowed from an art teacher which can be varnished over with out any problems. So I will report back with some pictures if it works….. Thanks to all for you suggestions….

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