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Forum topic by WoodMarkCreations posted 12-21-2017 02:32 AM 421 views 0 times favorited 4 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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WoodMarkCreations

67 posts in 2902 days


12-21-2017 02:32 AM

I am thinking of purchasing an inverted pin router. I don’t know a lot about these things and have been checking them out. Currently I hollow out, for lack of better terms, thick wood blocks roughly 6×6 x 6. Not all the way through them though. I am doing this with a hand held router going roughly 1/4 to 3/8 of an inch at a time until the hole is approximately 5 inches deep. All this done with a 1/2 inch router bit and switching to a 1/2 inch end mill to get the depth. I am also using a 1/4 inch template and guide bushing on the router base. Almost always one of a kind projects and odd shaped holes. Obviously I am looking for an easier and safer way to do this. I can install a riser block on the pin arm of the machine to achieve the extra height required, but figure I will still have to switch bits to achieve the depth as the machine only has 3 inches of plunge.

Any input or advice is welcome. I have done a lot of research on the machine I am looking at, but am still interested in anything more as I would by no means consider myself an expert


4 replies so far

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wuddoc

311 posts in 3832 days


#1 posted 12-21-2017 05:19 AM

You may wish to look at an overarm pin router. Grizzly sells two models with quite a long stroke. The 1st one appears to be a copy of the Delta RU-50

http://www.grizzly.com/products/Overarm-High-Speed-Router/G8030?utm_campaign=zPage&utm_source=grizzly.com

The 2nd is 3phase only and looks similar to many older USA manufacturers models.

http://www.grizzly.com/products/5-HP-Overarm-Router-2-Speed-3-Phase/G9981?utm_campaign=zPage&utm_source=grizzly.com

There are other manufacturers out there that may have the stroke length you desire.

-- Wuddoc

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WoodMarkCreations

67 posts in 2902 days


#2 posted 12-21-2017 01:16 PM



You may wish to look at an overarm pin router. Grizzly sells two models with quite a long stroke. The 1st one appears to be a copy of the Delta RU-50

http://www.grizzly.com/products/Overarm-High-Speed-Router/G8030?utm_campaign=zPage&utm_source=grizzly.com

The 2nd is 3phase only and looks similar to many older USA manufacturers models.

http://www.grizzly.com/products/5-HP-Overarm-Router-2-Speed-3-Phase/G9981?utm_campaign=zPage&utm_source=grizzly.com

There are other manufacturers out there that may have the stroke length you desire.

- wuddoc

Thanks,
I would rather have an inverted pin router. I just feel it will be safer. The one I am looking at has 5/8 inch and 1 inch less stroke than the ones you mentioned

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wuddoc

311 posts in 3832 days


#3 posted 12-21-2017 10:18 PM

You are correct about feeling safer. Have you spoken with a C. R. Onsrud customer service representative about your requirements? I have used their smaller inverted router over the years and always was happy with its operation. The safety with the bit underneath was a big factor when letting students use it versus the overarm pi router.

-- Wuddoc

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Loren

10477 posts in 3762 days


#4 posted 12-21-2017 11:53 PM

If you want to try it out you might consider
combining a digital router lift with an overarm
pin. Since your projects are small you wouldn’t
need a large throat, simplifying the custom
build.

I have a Delta RU60. I can understand the
anxiety about having the cutter on top but you
can see where you’ve removed material and
where you haven’t. I don’t have a hard and
fast rule about wasting out voids, but I can
say that I don’t find plowing around randomly
with the whole cutter an effective approach.
I usually plow a trench and then widen it
by half-widths of the cutter.

If wasting out carved boxes I might carve
the perimeter with the router, then drill
out the waste to some depth with a forstner
bit on a drill press, then go back to the router
and so on. I’d have to do a time study to
say whether such an approach was faster
but I think it would be more pleasant and
give the router cutter time to cool down.
I’ve found when routing a lot the heat build
up causes burning which smells nasty.

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