LumberJocks

General purpose blade choice.

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by Carloz posted 12-20-2017 08:44 PM 841 views 0 times favorited 24 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Carloz's profile

Carloz

1147 posts in 740 days


12-20-2017 08:44 PM

If you have experience with the following blades which one you would choose again?
And is the last blade, arguably the best of 4 worth 4-5 times more than the first one?

DELTA 35-7657

Amana PR1040

Freud P410

Infinity Super General


24 replies so far

View buckbuster31's profile

buckbuster31

254 posts in 664 days


#1 posted 12-20-2017 10:10 PM

heard great things of the infinity. I have been a forrest die hard but my try the infinity

View LittleShaver's profile

LittleShaver

398 posts in 768 days


#2 posted 12-20-2017 10:20 PM

I’m a long time fan of Freud blades. My experience is with their thin kerf blades.

-- Sawdust Maker

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

8129 posts in 3524 days


#3 posted 12-20-2017 11:39 PM

Have tried and tested all them.

The Delta is best bang for the buck….it’ll get you 95% of the best of the premium general purpose blades for < $30 to your door. Will give you glue ready edges.

The Amana is fine but is not in the league of the Super General or the Fusion IMO, but it depends somewhat on what you’ll be cutting and what your objective is. Price generally rules it out for me….there’s just no advantage.

The Fusion and Super General have very similar designs. Overall, the Infinity blades I’ve tried are made the highest standards of any brand I’ve used. The Super General has larger carbide than the Fusion…both will make cleaner more polished cuts than a WWII 40T…their performance is actually more similar to the 48T WWII. The downside is that the Hi-ATB tips will abrade faster than a standard ATB tip, plus the dual side grind that makes the edges so highly polished can also increase the chance of burning in thicker materials or if the saw isn’t set up as well as it should be. Better in ply and crosscuts than all the other 40T general purpose blades I’ve tried, less efficient at ripping than some others.

With that said, since a general purpose blade is inherently a jack of all trades, master of none, get the Delta and put the savings toward a good 80T crosscut/ply blade, or a separate bulk rip blade if you really want to get to the top performance level.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View Planeman40's profile

Planeman40

1257 posts in 2910 days


#4 posted 12-20-2017 11:44 PM

Don’t discount the Harbor Freight table saw blades. I have used this one (https://www.harborfreight.com/12-in-96t-finishing-circular-saw-blade-62730.html) on my $4,000 Hammer K3 48” x 48” sliding table saw for three years now and find it to be the truest running, smoothest cutting all round saw blade I have ever had in my 60+ years of using a table saw. And so far it hasn’t needed re-sharpening.

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

View Knockonit's profile

Knockonit

454 posts in 351 days


#5 posted 12-21-2017 12:03 AM

Funny this comes up, i just picked up a 80 tooth unit for my unisaw, gonna give it a shot, see what goes, with coupon was a deal, so why not.
gonna throw it on this weekend, and give it a dust making opportunity on some maple


Don t discount the Harbor Freight table saw blades. I have used this one (https://www.harborfreight.com/12-in-96t-finishing-circular-saw-blade-62730.html) on my $4,000 Hammer K3 48” x 48” sliding table saw for three years now and find it to be the truest running, smoothest cutting all round saw blade I have ever had in my 60+ years of using a table saw. And so far it hasn t needed re-sharpening.

- Planeman40


View Carloz's profile

Carloz

1147 posts in 740 days


#6 posted 12-21-2017 12:24 AM


Have tried and tested all them.

The Delta is best bang for the buck….it ll get you 95% of the best of the premium general purpose blades for < $30 to your door. Will give you glue ready…
- knotscott


Thanks knotscott,
Can you comment on the ripping ability of the delta?
I found that clean croscutting is of low importance to me for hardwood. You hardly ever see crossgrain, and where you do it is usually a small area that takes a minute two to sand down.
Plywood could be a different story but for that I have a 60t blade. So as long as there is no gross tearout it works for me.

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

8129 posts in 3524 days


#7 posted 12-21-2017 02:49 AM

The parameters on the Delta are very similar to the WWII’s. It’ll rip as efficiently as any of the 40T blades. For $30 but blade is a no brainer IMO. It’s made in the US, has large C4 carbide, high quality laser cut steel body, precision manufacturing, and is a standard well proven ATB 40T design.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View jonah's profile

jonah

1844 posts in 3447 days


#8 posted 12-21-2017 03:03 AM

I’ve got the Delta blade, and Scott is right on. It’s a fantastic value. My WWII might cut a little better, but I honestly can’t tell the difference. I mostly work with domestic hardwoods and plywood, and I haven’t tried to cut anything where I was ever tempted to put my Forrest 20T rip blade on.

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

12370 posts in 2529 days


#9 posted 12-21-2017 05:46 AM

I have the Fusion. Performance doesn’t live up to the marketing, I am not able to get chip free cuts in melamine, but I would still recommend it. It’s very quiet and is an excellent cutter. If you will be doing a lot of ripping, you might consider a combination blade instead.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

5097 posts in 2642 days


#10 posted 12-21-2017 12:11 PM

I’ve always trusted Scott’s advice and couldn’t pass up the deal on the Delta blade so I ordered one….hell, you spend more than that to get a good blade sharpened. E bay (Cripe Distributing) has them for $30 shipped.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

3532 posts in 2137 days


#11 posted 12-21-2017 12:18 PM

I have and use the Freud P410. It gives me very good cuts in plywood with no splinters. It also works well with cross cuts. I do not care for it as a rip blade and get some burning because the side clearance is very small. I have checked my Sawstop and everything is well aligned and still get a small amount of burning if I am ripping some woods.

For ripping, I use a Freud glue line rip.

View jmos's profile

jmos

869 posts in 2518 days


#12 posted 12-21-2017 01:08 PM

I’ve been very happy with Infinity blades, I have a few. I have a Super General, I found when I soaked it in cleaning fluid the blue-ish coating started coming off; I didn’t love that. Cuts well though.

Don’t discount their other combo blade It works very well too, is cheaper, and doesn’t have the coating to come off. That’s the one I use now.

-- John

View Carloz's profile

Carloz

1147 posts in 740 days


#13 posted 12-21-2017 01:27 PM



I have the Fusion. Performance doesn t live up to the marketing, I am not able to get chip free cuts in melamine, but I would still recommend it. It s very quiet and is an excellent cutter. If you will be doing a lot of ripping, you might consider a combination blade instead.

- Rick_M


Is a combination blade better for ripping than a geberal purpose blade?

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

5097 posts in 2642 days


#14 posted 12-21-2017 02:41 PM

To me those 2 phases have always meant the exact, same thing. You can rip with very well with a combo blade that has fewer teeth. I have a WWII with 30 teeth. Doesn’t crosscut nearly as smooth as my 40 tooth model, but it rips a lot better. Forrest doesn’t recommend ripping anything over 1” thick with the 40 tooth; I think that probably applies to most combo blades.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

3094 posts in 1629 days


#15 posted 12-21-2017 04:02 PM


I found that clean croscutting is of low importance to me for hardwood. You hardly ever see crossgrain, and where you do it is usually a small area that takes a minute two to sand down.

Tear out is the issue when xcutting, not blade marks on the end grain. This is the reason for a high tooth count and ATB grind. Sanding down tear out is not good ww’ing technique.

I know you have other posts regarding this topic and I’ll repeat what I and several others have said: you won’t get good results trying to do everything with one blade. A general purpose 40T blade does neither type of cut well. Its intended more for a construction site.

I’ll repeat what my previous recommendation: 60T for xcuts and 24-30T for rips. I guarantee pushing 8/4 hardwood through a 40T blade will get old real fast.

If you have firmly made up your mind about it, at least buy the best blade you can afford.

FWIW, I only use Freud and CMT. I’ve used Amana blades they are very good, too. I had one Irwin blade the runout was so bad I took it back.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

showing 1 through 15 of 24 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com