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Finishing quarter sawm teak veneer on mdf

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Forum topic by mikewaters posted 12-19-2017 02:37 AM 1993 views 0 times favorited 23 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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mikewaters

21 posts in 353 days


12-19-2017 02:37 AM

I was thinking of using waterlox sealer
But then I saw general finishes oil too.

I was going to use a foam brush.

I have never finished anything in my life, and this is going to be on $7,000 worth of veneer and mdf on my kitchen..

My initial thought was to pay somebody to spray it
But now I am thinking that this is a great opportunity for me to learn how to finish



23 replies so far

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mikewaters

21 posts in 353 days


#1 posted 12-19-2017 02:40 AM

Also will it be blotchy? Or is that only on plywood?
And the veneer is 1/42” and is being put on by superior veneer in Indiana.
Should I just have them put the wood veneer directly into the mdf? Or should they add some sort of backer?

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Aj2

1651 posts in 1913 days


#2 posted 12-19-2017 04:33 AM

Sound like this is over your head. Maybe hire a pro before you learn the hard way. Unless that’s the way you roll.
Good luck

-- Aj

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Andybb

1222 posts in 719 days


#3 posted 12-19-2017 04:56 AM

1. Where will it be used in your kitchen? A table? How will it be edged? I ask because I’m curious why you are not applying it to plywood. If there is any chance that it is going to get wet I’d use plywood vs mdf. If the name of the company is “Superior Veneer” then they know what to do and how to apply it.

2. The oak is a hardwood and won’t be blotchy like soft woods like pine or poplar.

3. If you’ve never finished anything in your life I assume that means you don’t have a lot of finishing supplies. I’ll tell you what I would do with the disclaimer that there are a lot of people here who are experts that should give their opinion. But if you want to give it a try…...

Find some scrap to practice on. Lightly sand with 220 if needed. Use a vacuum or compressed air to blow off the dust and if necessary wipe with mineral spirits. If you wipe with water you will raise the grain and will just need to give it one last sanding. Buy cans of Deft gloss and one can of semi gloss at Home Depot and a spray handle. Follow the directions on the can. 3 or 4 coats with a half hour between coats. Use the semi gloss for the last coat. Wetsand with 400. Buff and wax.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

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mikewaters

21 posts in 353 days


#4 posted 12-19-2017 02:27 PM

I looked into spraying, but did not like relying on learning something new. Meaning, I have painted hundreds of rooms, trim and other projects. I am an excellent painter.

I have watched several videos on YouTube.
I also am a very patient and tedious person.

Brushing on oil does not seem to be too difficult as long as I don’t put too much on.

My plan was to
1.sand with 220 using festool random orbit.
2.Compressor air + alcohol to clean
3.Use foam brush to apply front side
4.Wait One day
5.Use foam brush to apply back side
6.Wait One day
7.Use foam brush to apply to edgebanding
8.Wait One day
9.Lightly sand going with grain, by hand, with 400
10. Apply coats again.
11. Sand with 400 grit if needed to remove grain fuzz
12. Apply last coat (3 total)

I am going to practice on the backside of the panels first.

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JADobson

1163 posts in 2226 days


#5 posted 12-19-2017 02:38 PM


I am going to practice on the backside of the panels first.

- mikewaters

Practice on scraps. You won’t regret that no matter what happens.

-- No craft is very far from the line beyond which is magic. -- Lord Dunsany — Instagram @grailwoodworks

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DS

2978 posts in 2536 days


#6 posted 12-19-2017 02:47 PM

+1

Always have a test piece, even if you have decades of experience.

It’s always better to be surprised when it doesn’t affect your final project.

I can check and adjust on the scrap without killing my project.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

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bondogaposis

4925 posts in 2467 days


#7 posted 12-19-2017 02:51 PM

My plan was to
1.sand with 220 using festool random orbit.

Be careful you don’t sand right through that 1/42” veneer. It’ll go quick. Myself, I’d hand sand using a cork block and 220 grit, very lightly.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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mikewaters

21 posts in 353 days


#8 posted 12-19-2017 03:07 PM



My plan was to
1.sand with 220 using festool random orbit.

Be careful you don t sand right through that 1/42” veneer. It ll go quick. Myself, I d hand sand using a cork block and 220 grit, very lightly.

- bondogaposis

Great idea.
That was my original thought as well… but then I was thinking festool ROB on a setting of ‘1’ would be so light.

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Andybb

1222 posts in 719 days


#9 posted 12-19-2017 03:25 PM

I have painted hundreds of rooms, trim and other projects. I am an excellent painter

- mikewaters


Ah. Then you do have experience finishing. Go for it. Like others have said just be very gentle with the sanding. We have all had that “oh s**t” moment when you realize that you’ve sanded down through the veneer, especially at the edges. You are sanding to 220 so the finish has something to hold on to. The finish gets the 400 grit and will be smooth.

I only mentioned the Deft because it’s easy, relatively fool proof and only 30 minutes between coats. It’s only $5 a can so it might be worth a test on some scrap but you seem to be comfortable with a brush. I’d practice on some scrap rather than the back side. It’s just way too easy to scratch or gouge the veneer flipping and handling it. Once I get the veneer on the substrate I avoid it like it’s poison.

I’m still curious to know where 7k of veneer goes in a kitchen.
Good luck.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

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mikewaters

21 posts in 353 days


#10 posted 12-19-2017 03:57 PM

Ok great advice.
Avoid it like it is poison! Great!!

Keep the tips coming brothers !

7k total. Veneer itself is 2k worth of teak 2k worth of graphite oak and 3k for superior veneer to lay the veneer on MDF.

I chose MDF because it is extremely stable in terms of staying flat and anti-warping. MDF was recommended to me by multiple skilled people over plywood.

They all said the finishing and sealing the wood will stop any moisture..

Superior does offer moisture resistant boards though. Only .75 sq. Ft. More

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Andybb

1222 posts in 719 days


#11 posted 12-19-2017 04:08 PM

The better analogy would be to treat it like a baby’s butt.

That makes sense. The MDF is very stable. I use it under veneer all the time especially on large frames etc.

Post some pics as you progress.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

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mikewaters

21 posts in 353 days


#12 posted 12-19-2017 05:48 PM

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Andybb

1222 posts in 719 days


#13 posted 12-19-2017 06:18 PM

Wow! Very impressive. On second thought I might get somebody to spray that for me considering the investment in materials. I’d want that to be perfect. Maybe you could just do the dark wood of the island base but those cabinets are going to be on display front and center.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

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mikewaters

21 posts in 353 days


#14 posted 12-19-2017 06:45 PM

How could I possibly screw up oil though as long as I use little amounts at a time?

It’s self leveling and pretty dumby proof I thought.

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Andybb

1222 posts in 719 days


#15 posted 12-19-2017 06:53 PM

True. Maybe it’s just me but I know I’d find a way to screw it up. :-). That’s a lot of surface area. Go for it. !

-- Andy - Seattle USA

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