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Forum topic by harum posted 12-18-2017 04:35 AM 566 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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harum

285 posts in 1665 days


12-18-2017 04:35 AM

Was wondering if one could join two boards with rows of long, sliding dovetails like on the photo without using a CNC? I’m looking to cut only two-three long parallel dovetails on each board. Is there a jig for a router for this? Thanks!

-- "If you're not counting the ripples when throwing pebbles in the water, you're wasting your time."


7 replies so far

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Aj2

1420 posts in 1819 days


#1 posted 12-18-2017 04:45 AM

Now that’s a overly complicated joint that make no sense. I like it! :)

-- Aj

View harum's profile

harum

285 posts in 1665 days


#2 posted 12-18-2017 04:49 AM

I saw it on wooden planes attaching soles to bodies. The photo is from the Internet, not mine. I’m looking for something simpler: only three rows of dovetails and they can be parallel to the longer dimension of the boards.

-- "If you're not counting the ripples when throwing pebbles in the water, you're wasting your time."

View Loren's profile

Loren

10476 posts in 3669 days


#3 posted 12-18-2017 06:51 AM

Cut some plywood rectangles, then cut out
rectangles inside. Assuming you want to
cut the joints symmetrically you’d position
these “windows” on a guide board in a way
that allows some lateral adjustment. Fuss
with the adjustment until you have the windows
spaced correctly so two routed parts will
match. Use as many windows as you need.

The concept is similar to those door hinge
router jigs with the 3 windows, one for each
hinge and spacer bars in between.

Use a router guide bushing for cutting the joints.

You could also make the guide board from a
single piece with cutouts on one side, but
your math and layout would have to be dead-on.

I made a box joint jig this way once. I had
an Incra fence on my table saw which made it
easy.

View harum's profile

harum

285 posts in 1665 days


#4 posted 12-18-2017 04:52 PM


Cut some plywood rectangles, then cut out
rectangles inside. Assuming you want to
cut the joints symmetrically you d position
these “windows” on a guide board in a way
that allows some lateral adjustment. Fuss
with the adjustment until you have the windows
spaced correctly so two routed parts will
match. Use as many windows as you need.

- Loren

Thanks Loren! This is definitely an option. Would this work? First, cut strips of plywood of two widths, one width—top of tails, the other—bottom of tails; then glue the wider strips onto a frame using the narrower strips as spacers; then mark the boards using this template and pre-cut rough dadoes on table saw for easier routing. It may take some tweaking to get an acceptable fit.

Or, I could adapt the “box joint on the table saw” approach for routing: using a long guiding tail carefully positioned with respect to the dovetail bit for good fit.

-- "If you're not counting the ripples when throwing pebbles in the water, you're wasting your time."

View BurlyBob's profile

BurlyBob

5543 posts in 2287 days


#5 posted 12-18-2017 04:57 PM

I want to see it when you finish. That takes some serious outside of the box thinking. It’s going to be amazing looking for certain.

View Loren's profile

Loren

10476 posts in 3669 days


#6 posted 12-18-2017 06:22 PM

It’s not that complicated a jig idea and you
could approach it in a simpler way than using
rectangle cut outs. The only tricky part is
getting the spacing exact.

My box joint jig was a router jig. I used the
table saw to make it.

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

2069 posts in 1244 days


#7 posted 12-18-2017 09:56 PM

Depending on the strength required, you could do as Loren suggests, but to avoid the need for exact spacing you could rip off all the rectangles on the side board, install them into the top, then glue the side board back on.

This would lock in the spacing. The side board could then be removed and the tips of the rectangles shaved back to perfect depth.

A piece that wide would have great long grain glue surface to be very sturdy.

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