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Forum topic by mrg posted 03-08-2011 05:33 AM 3778 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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mrg

659 posts in 2465 days


03-08-2011 05:33 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question tablesaw

Good evening to one and all.
I have a Delta 34-410 contractors saw that is wired to run off of 110 volts. I just replaced the fence and wanted to replace the power switch with a new on/off switch with the paddle. The original toggle switch works fine.

I bought a switch from a company that is closing it doors, woodworking machines sales service. The switch was wired for 220 volt saw the guy told me cut the two plugs off and just wire it up and it old work. The plug to the wall i cut and put a 110v plug on white neutral, black hot and green ground, the other plug that came out had a female plug 3 wires same, looked like the female end for a computer monitor or computer. I did not hard wire to the saw.

Plug saw into what was the female end, plug from switch to wall, leave stock toggle on, push on and saw runs but shuts down when I let go. switch also has a circuit breaker.

If I remove the switch out the saw runs fine. i think it is a wiring issue or that the switch only works as 220. Any input would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks again.

-- mrg


14 replies so far

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TopamaxSurvivor

17671 posts in 3141 days


#1 posted 03-08-2011 10:37 AM

The switch will work on either voltage. It stops when you let go of what?

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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mrg

659 posts in 2465 days


#2 posted 03-08-2011 02:08 PM

If I hold the green on button it works, if I remove my finger the saw stops.
Il will post a picture of what I did.

-- mrg

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brtech

905 posts in 2388 days


#3 posted 03-08-2011 05:45 PM

Sounds like the switch is broken.

It’s designed so the green button turns it on, and the paddle turns it off, right? It’s not doing that. If the saw runs when you press the button, I think you wired it up correctly.

It would be a mechanical problem on the switch itself. The paddle mechanism is always engaged.

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TopamaxSurvivor

17671 posts in 3141 days


#4 posted 03-08-2011 07:50 PM

I agree it is teh switch if yio udo not have a magnetic motor starter clicking in and out somewhere. It would be a box about 8” high, 6” wide and 4 or 5 deep.

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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swirt

2118 posts in 2437 days


#5 posted 03-08-2011 08:04 PM

Could it be a magnetic switch that needs 220 to give enough strength to the magnet to keep it engaged?

-- Galootish log blog, http://www.timberframe-tools.com

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TopamaxSurvivor

17671 posts in 3141 days


#6 posted 03-08-2011 08:12 PM

It will not pull in at all on 120 if it has a 240 coil. Do you even have one? It will be a box at least as big as I saind in teh post above.

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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brtech

905 posts in 2388 days


#7 posted 03-08-2011 08:12 PM

I suppose if this was a motor starter switch instead of a plain old ordinary power switch. I would have thought the seller would know better.

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TopamaxSurvivor

17671 posts in 3141 days


#8 posted 03-08-2011 08:16 PM

I just googled that saw number. It probably does not have a mag starter, I shoiuld not have confused the issue, Sorry.

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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swirt

2118 posts in 2437 days


#9 posted 03-08-2011 11:28 PM

I was not talking about a magnetic starter switch, I was thinking more along the lines of one of these
for 110
vs one of these for 220

I would think that one designed for 220 would see a loss of one of the legs (only seeing 110) as a power failure and disconnect so that it doesn’t come back on if power was restored. I’m not sure, but that is the way I would want it to work.

-- Galootish log blog, http://www.timberframe-tools.com

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TopamaxSurvivor

17671 posts in 3141 days


#10 posted 03-09-2011 05:14 AM

One of them is probably single pole and the other 2 pole with higher hp rating. They work the same way with a magnetic coil to hold the switch contact closed.

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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mrg

659 posts in 2465 days


#11 posted 03-09-2011 07:16 AM

Hello guys and thanks for the quick responses.

I did a quick search and came up with the catalog page for the switch manufacturer.

Spec says: Integrated switch with restart and under voltage protection. In case of voltage drop, switch contacts open.

I have attached a copy of the pdf with switch outlined, a picture i took of the switch side with wiring diagram. Switch also has a circuit breaker.

If the switch can only be used for 220-240 volts i will rewire the motor and run off of 220. Also can you run two outlets on 1 220 circuit or do i have to run another one? I know i will have to change my plugs.

As you can see in the picture of the saw I clipped the plugs on the new switch as described in my first post so as to not remove the original switch. You will see on the back wall to the right my outlet for the dust collector. That is the outlet i was talking about ganging up if possible. I plan on having the panel upgraded over the summer because I don’t have much room in the panel and the cover that is on it is not the correct one. The updates thru out the house that are planned i will need moor electric, need to do in steps.

Thanks again for the help.

-- mrg

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TopamaxSurvivor

17671 posts in 3141 days


#12 posted 03-09-2011 07:54 AM

If you have to hold the green button for that to stay on, it has a problem inside. Any 220 switch can be used for 120. Just do no worry about the extra terminals; leave them alone.

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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mrg

659 posts in 2465 days


#13 posted 03-10-2011 06:53 PM

Hell guys,
Thanks for the help. I got in touch with the company and yes indeed the switchis fine. The problem is that the switch only works at 220v. It is a magnetic switch, if it senses the voltage is low it won’t work. The switch is only seeing 115v so shuts down.
I ordered another switch from Grizzly and it will be here in a day or two.

When I do the electric upgrade I will change the saw over to 220 and use the switch then.

-- mrg

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TopamaxSurvivor

17671 posts in 3141 days


#14 posted 03-10-2011 08:33 PM

They probably put that feature in that little swithch without having a fullblown motor starter for safety reasons. If the power goes out or breaker trips, the saw will not be in the on position and start running when power is restored.

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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