LumberJocks

Need some shopping advice

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by Sab1982 posted 12-16-2017 10:02 AM 360 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Sab1982's profile

Sab1982

12 posts in 485 days


12-16-2017 10:02 AM

Topic tags/keywords: tools power tools buying advice shop

Fair warning, this is long lol. So I have found myself in the position to buy a couple tools. My budget is currently around $450. Most people would be excited by this, but it is giving me an ulcer haha. I want to lay out what I do and what I have and get your feedback on what I should buy.

First off, I have a basement wood shop. It isn’t huge but it works.

I don’t want to upgrade anything yet. That will come but for now I have gaps in what I have. Here’s my tools:

Bosch 4100 TS – mobility and size are perfect for my situation

Porter cable 18v cordless set (drills and drivers blah blah)

Craftsman 10” bandsaw

Skill 10” drill press

Harbor freight belt/disc sander

Rigid ROS

Black and decker belt sander

Hitachi 10” miter saw

Rigid circular saw

Porter Cable 690 router with both bases

Master force plunge router

Old craftsman scroll saw

Harbor freight air compressor

Hitachi brad nailer

Kreg k4

Craftsman jig saw

Craftsman jointer (though I do most of my jointing on the TS)

I make small stuff that I sell online. Mostly home decor items to fund my woodworking habit and then I make larger pieces from the honey-do list. I’m just kind of torn on what to pick up. Here are some things I have considered:

Rigid oscilating belt sander (I have limited space and this would take the place of the next 2)
Harbor freight disc sander
Harbor freight spindle sander
Porter cable thickness planer (again, I only make small stuff really)
Bosh colt palm router

I am not in the market for handtools yet. I want to finish equipping my power tools first.

What would you do??


12 replies so far

View richardchaos's profile

richardchaos

583 posts in 252 days


#1 posted 12-16-2017 11:13 AM

I am sorry maybe I missed it… I did not see a TABLE Saw in there anywhere. Of you don’t have one thats what I would work on. if you do. I think a Larger disc sander would be great for this reason. It is very hard to sand a good 90* angle. IF you have a drill press you can get by with that for a DRUM sander of inside curves.

A combo disc belt sander is on my wish list

-- “In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act.” ― George Orwell

View Sab1982's profile

Sab1982

12 posts in 485 days


#2 posted 12-16-2017 11:26 AM

I have the Bosch 4100 tablesaw.

I the disc sander is near the top of the list, but I’m wondering if I couldn’t accomplish the same thing with the Rigid oscillating belt/spindle sander (just sanding to lines for clean up).

This is hard lol

View richardchaos's profile

richardchaos

583 posts in 252 days


#3 posted 12-16-2017 11:35 AM

Yes I guess you could get the same thing with a belt sander PLUS you can get inside curves with it as well using the end. ALSO don’t forget the things you can do with a SANDER like sharpening all sorts of stuff from Drill bits to the GOOD SCISSORS and Steak knives and such. I also like how you can use a sander to quickly ease the edge on say Pipe stock.


I have the Bosch 4100 tablesaw.

I the disc sander is near the top of the list, but I’m wondering if I couldn’t accomplish the same thing with the Rigid oscillating belt/spindle sander (just sanding to lines for clean up).

This is hard lol

- Sab1982

-- “In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act.” ― George Orwell

View cabmaker's profile

cabmaker

1666 posts in 2682 days


#4 posted 12-16-2017 01:44 PM

you say, in a basement shop setting?

I would be thinking some sort of dust collection or at least air filtration

You wearing a respirator ?

View Sab1982's profile

Sab1982

12 posts in 485 days


#5 posted 12-16-2017 01:51 PM

I didn’t think about listing that. I have a shop vac hooked up to a dust separator. 3 box fans with furnace filters attached for airborn particles and I wear a respirator any time I am doing anything that could create a lung hazard.


you say, in a basement shop setting?

I would be thinking some sort of dust collection or at least air filtration

You wearing a respirator ?

- cabmaker


View cabmaker's profile

cabmaker

1666 posts in 2682 days


#6 posted 12-16-2017 02:21 PM

good for you…...I waited 30 yrs on that …...i have been paying the piper for the past 15

View Rich's profile

Rich

2097 posts in 462 days


#7 posted 12-16-2017 02:55 PM

You say you do small projects to sell and bigger ones for home. What’s in the queue, and what tool(s) would be valuable to have to complete them? If you can’t think of anything right now, hang on to the money until you find something you want/need.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

116807 posts in 3450 days


#8 posted 12-16-2017 03:18 PM

You know better than anyone else what will make you work go faster and better than anyone else.
Projects that have hollow and round shapes a Ridgid oscillating sander is a very good tool to have. and instead of the colt router, I would suggest one of the compact routers sets and basic router bit set.

https://www.amazon.com/DEWALT-DWP611PK-Torque-Variable-Compact/dp/B0049ZFUK2/ref=sr_1_1?s=hi&ie=UTF8&qid=1513435403&sr=1-1&keywords=dewalt+router

https://www.homedepot.com/p/RIDGID-Oscillating-Edge-Belt-Spindle-Sander-EB4424/100061671

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View bilyo's profile

bilyo

88 posts in 975 days


#9 posted 12-16-2017 06:15 PM

I have always relied on my drill press and sanding drums to clean up inside curves. These are not the best for this because, without oscillation, the drums create a groove pattern and then resist cutting any deeper. I would vote for the Ridgid oscillating spindle sander. Especially if you do a lot of that kind of work.

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

7819 posts in 3248 days


#10 posted 12-16-2017 06:28 PM

I find a planer to be invaluable for dimensioning lumber. It opens up tons of sources for wood, and ensures a uniform thickness. A jointer and planer used in tandem is a pretty potent combo of tools for ensuring straight, flat, square stock.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View Rick_M's profile

Rick_M

10821 posts in 2253 days


#11 posted 12-16-2017 07:29 PM

My suggestion is don’t buy things because you might need them, or think you should have them, buy because you need it right now. That keeps you from wasting money on things you’ll never use and becoming a tool/junk collector. Put that $450 in a cookie jar and make something, add to the jar when you can. You might decide that instead of buying something you don’t have, to upgrade something you already have.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

4526 posts in 2224 days


#12 posted 12-16-2017 07:34 PM

I’d get the planer. If you are making small projects you are going to need thinner than 3/4 stock.

-- Bondo Gaposis

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com