LumberJocks

Danish oil "weeping"

  • Advertise with us

« back to Finishing forum

Forum topic by maxyedor posted 12-15-2017 07:22 PM 539 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View maxyedor's profile

maxyedor

15 posts in 467 days


12-15-2017 07:22 PM

Finished up a hand-plane a couple days ago, costed it in Danish oil, and followed the typical steps. Soaked it, let it sit, wiped it clean. Soaked it again, wiped it again, and then dry for 72 hours. Looked at it yesterday and my previously buttery smooth surface “wept” I now have small drops of oil hardened on the surface. What’s the best way to clean these up?

My first instinct is to hit it with some steel wool, then apply another coat of finish, but I’m worried the droplets will just come back in a day or two and I’d really like to be done so I can wrap this gift up. Any other suggestions?

I’ll post some pics when I get home today


10 replies so far

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

2304 posts in 1365 days


#1 posted 12-15-2017 07:51 PM

When this happens to me, I hit it with #0000 wool. As to the next coat causing the same problem, it probably will, just much less.

The pores catch the oil and temperature changes cause the oil to either suck in or push out. Unless the pores are sealed (by letting the oil throughly dry), it will keep happening.

To end the cycle, I’d just hit it with the wool, then buff it good with a cloth to get any scratches out.

View maxyedor's profile

maxyedor

15 posts in 467 days


#2 posted 12-15-2017 10:57 PM

Copy that, I assumed as much. We’re getting something like 50 degrees of temp change every day, so it’s not an entirely ideal situation. I’ll do that and hopefully it’s cured enough to wrap by Sunday afternoon.

View mrg's profile

mrg

828 posts in 3142 days


#3 posted 12-16-2017 03:29 PM

You said your getting wide temp changes. Can you bring it into the house so it is in a stable environment and can cure?

-- mrg

View BurlyBob's profile

BurlyBob

5914 posts in 2408 days


#4 posted 12-16-2017 05:31 PM

I’ve often used a rag with Danish oil on it and rubbed the daylights out of the weeps till they disappear.

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

2304 posts in 1365 days


#5 posted 12-17-2017 03:22 PM



I ve often used a rag with Danish oil on it and rubbed the daylights out of the weeps till they disappear.

- BurlyBob


That was my technique when I first tried DO on red oak. OY! 8^)

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

4985 posts in 2494 days


#6 posted 12-17-2017 03:37 PM

Get it inside and warm. Danish oil is very slow curing in best conditions and may never cure in the cold. Rub out the nubs and keep wiping it dry until the weeping stops. If you need to top coat after rubbing out the nubs make it a very light one.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View JBrow's profile

JBrow

1366 posts in 1063 days


#7 posted 12-17-2017 04:25 PM

Maxyedor,

I discovered the same problem when using Danish oil; it weeps for several days after initial application even without temperature swings. I solved this problem by wiping the project two or three times a days for several days after the initial application. The spots of Danish oil that came to the surface were still wet and wiped away with no extraordinary effort. If I recall correctly, the weeping stopped after about three or four days.

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

3522 posts in 2131 days


#8 posted 12-17-2017 04:34 PM

What is considered soaking…..I finish small odd shaped parts by putting them in a Ziploc bag and gently shaking it a little, pull out of bag, wipe off and let dry. Is there some advantage of a long soak?

If needed, I will let it dry and then recount the same way.

View maxyedor's profile

maxyedor

15 posts in 467 days


#9 posted 12-18-2017 06:25 PM

Got it sorted out, rubbed it with steel wool, re-applied a very very thin coat 3 times and it’s good to go. The droplets weren’t hardened, but they definitely couldn’t be wiped away, it took the steel wool to scuff them off.


You said your getting wide temp changes. Can you bring it into the house so it is in a stable environment and can cure?

- mrg

Believe it or not the house has been swinging in temp more than the garage.

View newwoodbutcher's profile

newwoodbutcher

761 posts in 2993 days


#10 posted 12-18-2017 06:30 PM

What Maxyedor said

-- Ken

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com