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Thin kerf saw blades -- splitting hairs

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Forum topic by Furnitude posted 03-07-2011 05:36 PM 1325 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Furnitude

339 posts in 2162 days


03-07-2011 05:36 PM

In my search for a new blade for my table saw, I’m interested in a thin kerf blade that says it is .09375” thick. The splitter on my table saw says it is .094” thick. So that means my splitter is .00025” too thick. I’m really splitting hairs on hairs here. Also, there is enough wobble in my blade to probably cover that width easily. I’m trying hard not to be dense here, but my question is: will this blade work?

-- Mitch, http://furnitude.blogspot.com Also blog at http://www.craftsy.com/blog/author/mitch-roberson/


8 replies so far

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knotscott

5456 posts in 2030 days


#1 posted 03-07-2011 05:45 PM

It SHOULD work for the reasons you stated, and I’d definitely give it a go, but note that I’m not suggesting that you do…..(how’s that for a CYA?!)

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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Pop

419 posts in 2601 days


#2 posted 03-07-2011 05:54 PM

When you round .09375 off it = .94. We don’t know what the splitter is carried out to 100,000th (.09????). You have 2 ways to solve this. 1 – Measure the splitter with a caliper and see what it’s real thickness is.
Or, 2 – try it (with extreme caution) and return the blade if it doesn’t work. Maybe other LJs will come up with a better method. This is all I can think of.

Pop

-- One who works with his hands is a laborer, his hands & head A craftsman, his hands, head & heart a artist

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HorizontalMike

6938 posts in 1569 days


#3 posted 03-07-2011 05:55 PM

I guess that would depend on the reference YOU choose to use. My splitter/riving knife states an acceptable blade thickness that is AT LEAST 0.004 in. thicker (and up to 0.028 in. thicker) than my splitter in order to be safe. I would imagine, while you are on the safer side of the combination, you may find it difficult to push material through the TS if the boards have a tendency to pinch in the first place. I am sure SOME boards may have no problems, but this is something to seriously consider. My 2-cents…

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

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Furnitude

339 posts in 2162 days


#4 posted 03-07-2011 06:19 PM

Thanks for the info guys. The blade hasn’t arrived yet, but when it does I will give it a try. I’m sure I can return it if it doesn’t work. I thought of a couple things I might try with the new blade. First, remove the splitter and cut part way through a board. Measure the kerf and compare that to the splitter’s thickness. But I’ll probably just make a cut with the splitter and see how it goes. Since we are talking such a miniscule amout, I’m also thinking that I might be able to sand the splitter down a bit. I think the thin kerf blade is worth a try.

Scott, despite all your sound advice, I either bowed to pressure or followed my gut (can’t tell the difference these days) and bought a Forrest Woodworker II combo blade. :)

-- Mitch, http://furnitude.blogspot.com Also blog at http://www.craftsy.com/blog/author/mitch-roberson/

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knotscott

5456 posts in 2030 days


#5 posted 03-07-2011 07:23 PM

Hard to go wrong with a WWII….the vast majority love them. My “gut” usually leads me to the fridge though!

I think the WWII TK is more like 0.100” anyway, so the concern with the knife might be moot point. You may have derived 0.09375 by using 3/32” from their website, but that’s a rounded fraction. You’re good to go!

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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Blakep

232 posts in 1457 days


#6 posted 03-07-2011 07:32 PM

No advice on the blade but my “gut” just let me to the fridge and I am enjoying what I found as we speak.

View Furnitude's profile

Furnitude

339 posts in 2162 days


#7 posted 03-07-2011 10:40 PM

Talk about moot point—I just looked at my order and found that I ordered the full kerf instead of the thin kerf. Sorry for all the hullabaloo! I ordered it from Woodcraft and they offered to pay the shipping if I want to return the blade and switch it for a thin kerf. But you know, when I don’t listen to my gut (which is growling right now!), I listen to fate. I’m sure there is a difference between the thick and thin kerfs in performance, but this hobbiest probably won’t be able to tell. Plus, I kind of like knowing that the blade is 1/8” thick. So that’s where I stand. Thanks everyone for the great information and insight. I’ll let you know how the “thick” blade works out.
Mitch

-- Mitch, http://furnitude.blogspot.com Also blog at http://www.craftsy.com/blog/author/mitch-roberson/

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knotscott

5456 posts in 2030 days


#8 posted 03-08-2011 12:06 AM

There are a lot of folks who prefer full kerf for a variety of reasons. While only 1/32” of thicker, it is a 33% increase in width, which is definitely noticeable to your motor…more so in thicker material than < 1”. Both kerf widths are perfectly acceptable, but if you plan to rip much over an inch, you might want to consider a 24T rip blade. No worries about the riving knife allowing the kerf to pass!

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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