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220 Volt Delta tablesaw wiring/rewiring

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Forum topic by ladiesman217 posted 03-07-2011 07:17 AM 7589 views 1 time favorited 28 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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ladiesman217

74 posts in 1869 days


03-07-2011 07:17 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question tablesaw

I just bought my first “real” tablesaw, a 1986 Delta contractor saw with biesemeyer fence (50” rails), cast iron extension wings, extension table and outfeed table with assorted blades and other items. The owner sold it to me for a great price when he found out I recently graduated and I am a passionate woodworker. In my excitement,
I neglected to consider the wiring in my “shop”, a detached garage about 60 feet from my house. It turns out the saw is running 220 at the moment. All I have in my shop is a 110 circuit that breaks when I use my router with a shopvac dust collector too often. I know that it’s possible to rewire the motor to 110 but I was hoping to speak to someone that has done this before as the information I have found online as frequently been contradictory in places. Thanks in advance everybody!

-- Rock Chalk Jayhawk!


28 replies so far

View Pete_Jud's profile

Pete_Jud

423 posts in 2407 days


#1 posted 03-07-2011 08:56 AM

Just my 2 cents, It is time to get your shop wired for 220. If you are tripping the breaker now, you run the risk of burning out the motor on the new saw. And it will not preform well with the voltage drop that you will see under load. I do my own wiring and it has always pass inspection, and in many states you are allowed to do it youself, or talk to an wire jockey and see if you can get him to knock the price down if you dig your own trench. With the home building slowdown, you might be able to get a deal. Good Luck

-- Life is to short to own an ugly boat.

View tenontim's profile

tenontim

2131 posts in 2399 days


#2 posted 03-07-2011 02:21 PM

Your saw should have a wiring diagram on the motor, that will show you which wires to switch, in the motor, to change it back to 110v.

View TheWoodNerd's profile

TheWoodNerd

288 posts in 1846 days


#3 posted 03-07-2011 03:47 PM

You might want to seriously consider running a 240 line out to the shop and install a subpanel. I have the same situation and did the work myself, as I recall I spent about $500 altogether.

-- The Wood Nerd -- http://www.workshopaholic.net

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1347 days


#4 posted 03-07-2011 03:54 PM

Second the above^. I bought a vintage tablesaw like yours that was wired for 110V. My wiring diagram was underneath the cap near the circuit reset. I rewired it for 110V until I could get the electricians out. It was a drag. There was insufficient power to make the gentlest of cut. I had the shop rewired with a dedicated 220V for my saw. Now, I absolutely love it. It will power through anything in sight.

You bought yourself a very nice saw & you’ll never get to thoroughly enjoy it until you get 220V out there. Sorry, but that’s the truth from someone who’s done it. Good luck!

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View MedicKen's profile

MedicKen

1599 posts in 2116 days


#5 posted 03-07-2011 05:04 PM

It is possible to rewire the saw for 110V. However, you have to remember that the amp draw will double when doing so. If the saw is drawing 15-18 amps at 220V you will be looking at approx 30 amps at 110V. You say that your router trips the breaker now so, running a unisaw will be next to impossible. You can run a heavy extenion cord to the saw, I would recommend at least #10 based on the length of run. You can make an extension cord to run the saw and plug it into a dryer outlet if close enough. Ultimately you are going to need 220V, maybe now is the time to get ‘er done.

-- My job is to give my kids things to discuss with their therapist....medic20447@gmail.com

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

6938 posts in 1568 days


#6 posted 03-07-2011 05:37 PM

As everyone is saying, 240v is the price of admission. Fudge on this and any money that you saved on the price of your TS will go up in smoke (possibly for real). Like Pete, I wired my own detached garage with both 120 and 240v service. My advice is DO NOT skimp on wire size, either IN the garage or TO the garage from the house.

FWIW I used 80ft of #00 AWG, the largest my garage panel would take. I only called in a currently licensed electrician AFTER I had run all the wiring for lights, 120v, and 240v outlets and had all those hooked up to the garage’s service panel. The electrician then made the final hook-up between the house service panel and the garage service panel (after he had me pull the #00 overhead and through the rigid standpipe.

I have NEVER looked back… This is the best thing I have ever done for the garage (other than build it myself). And besides, it will add value to your house if/when you ever decide to move (keep receipts for future reference).

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1347 days


#7 posted 03-07-2011 05:47 PM

^couldn’t have said it better than HorizontalMike^. Once we got into trenching my yard for the upgrade, I gave the go-ahead to go all out & ran two 60-amp feeds out there. I could probably charge an electric car out there now, but I’ll stick to my 10mpg truck. It only hurts once & you’ll feel safer having it done properly, plus your new saw will roar in appreciation. If you ever resell your home, you can brag about the capability to the prospective buyer. It’s worth it.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View teejk's profile

teejk

1215 posts in 1339 days


#8 posted 03-07-2011 07:02 PM

I have owned the contractor saw for 10 years and have had no problems with it on 120v (I say 120 instead of 110, same for 240 vs 220, because I have a lineman friend that slaps me whenever I use the lower numbers…put a voltage meter on it and you will probably see he is correct). I never upgraded to 240v because it needed some new parts to do it (can’t remember whether it was the switch or the cord between the motor and the switch or maybe both).

However, sounds like an upgrade is needed anyway if he is tripping the breaker with a router (probably meant for lighting and only 15a running 14ga wire and experiencing some severe line-loss on a 60’ run). As long as he’s at it, may as well run 3 wire+ground as opposed to 2 wire+ground. Either are going to be pricey especially since they will need to be meant for ground contact. Once into the building he will have 240v which he can use as is or split into 120v circuits via choice of the breaker.

So his big question is how much does he need so he can determine wire size and the breaker on the house side? I operated my old shop on a simple 6 slot sub-panel fed on a 50a breaker using #8 copper (2 120v circuits and one 240v that took 2 slots, leaving 2 spares). Because there are very few times (if any) where more than one machine is being used at the same time, never a problem for me.

My new shop runs from the house on a 100a breaker via aluminum wire (much cheaper than copper at today’s prices) to a SquareD 24 slot subpanel (Homeline that I caught on sale for about $35 plus breakers at maybe $5-8 each). I am using 6 of those slots! Again, there are very few times (if any) where more than one machine is being used at the same time.

So ask an electrician about proper sizing taking into account your intended uses. Or tell me where you live and I’ll come pick up the saw if within reasonable driving distance!

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1347 days


#9 posted 03-07-2011 07:13 PM

I generally run a large tool, large dust collector, & electric heat simultaneously. I would trip breakers at the saw spun up to speed. Putting the saw on 220V (240V) & the rest on 110V (120V) remedied this. I’m no electrician, but my saw appeared underpowered at 110V (120V) and wonderful at 220V (240V). I suppose individual saws may differ.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View teejk's profile

teejk

1215 posts in 1339 days


#10 posted 03-07-2011 07:26 PM

bertha…the electric heat is probably the culprit. VERY high draw on anything that generates heat (toasters, hair dryers, etc.) Absent that, I seriously doubt you would have an issue running a tool and DC on 2 separate 120v 20amp circuits.

I wired my new shop for 240v and I’ll take another look at converting the TS (it needs some new parts to accomplish). I put it off because I haven’t had a problem with 110v on mine (although I did convert my old RAS and saw a noticable difference). Maybe it’s like hi-speed internet…if you never used it, you didn’t know what you were missing. And once you use it, you can’t go back!

View wilterbeast's profile

wilterbeast

44 posts in 1303 days


#11 posted 03-07-2011 07:33 PM

You would be far better off to go ahead and run a service out to you garage. Digging the ditch will suck but its well worth it. You can do the work yourself, its not rocket science. I dont know how new jersey is but here in ohio homeowners can pull permits themselves if their going to do the work themselves. You can go to the library and get some books on how to do it. Its really not that bad, I’ve been and electrician for 20 yrs and my girlfriend says im a dumb@##! Plus learning to do it yourself is only going to teach you more which will save you more in the future.

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1347 days


#12 posted 03-07-2011 07:38 PM

Teejk, I can only speak for my saw & the guy I bought it from even mentioned “don’t try to run dis dare thing on one-ten (in West Virginia drawl)”. Once I got the 100A subpanel, I put the lights on one 15A, the dustcollector on a 20A & the heater on a 20A. The saw & jointer get their own 220’s. You’re right, if I turn off that heater, I can run a time machine with no problem! I got an estimate for running gas out there & hearing the estimate, said “Whoa, gulp, tha’ll have to wait a bit”. Mine was an easy fix; just move a couple jumpers, upgrade the powercord, & I was in business. It might be worth trying yours out at 220; it made a world of difference with mine. Good luck!

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1347 days


#13 posted 03-07-2011 07:39 PM

Hey Wilterbeast, after getting my electrician’s bill, “dumb” wasn’t the first thing that came to mind :)

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

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wilterbeast

44 posts in 1303 days


#14 posted 03-07-2011 09:48 PM

See bertha all the more reason he should try it himself! Lol the biggest reason people are afraid of electricity is because they cant see it. It not like you can see that 240v heading right for you. I would say if you got alittle knowledge behind you, keep track of all you wires and make sure all you connections are tight you would be suprised at how well you do. Another very good option is to do like horizontalmike did and wire everything up and have an electrician come in and do the final hook up.

View teejk's profile

teejk

1215 posts in 1339 days


#15 posted 03-07-2011 10:19 PM

everybody

please call digger’s hotline before you dig anything. It will cost you a day or two or three while you wait but the service itself is free. Metal digger in any line (electric/phone/cable etc.) will cost you in more ways than I can post but it ranges from dead to somewhere less than that.

with that out of the way, I think I would still consult an electrician (and no I am not one of those). codes are getting goofy and they are getting enforced. Wire size will depend on the shop subpanel size and length of run. Figure that out and you will know the breaker size in the house (will take 2 slots). There are a lot of small pieces involved (LB’s, sweeps, bushings, conduit etc.) to get out of the house and into the shop but they are pretty cheap and available at the big box stores. It’s a pretty easy process. Come into a new sub-panel in the shop and then wire away! I used surface mounted 3/4” metal but I’ll save that for now (a very simple process there as well).

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