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Forum topic by Ripper70 posted 12-14-2017 02:31 AM 5657 views 1 time favorited 31 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Ripper70

1127 posts in 1049 days


12-14-2017 02:31 AM

Hello All,

Thanks to all my fellow LJ’ers that helped me solve some issues I was having a few weeks ago while installing some baseboard moldings in my humble abode. I’ve been making progress since and have come upon another stumbling block. Hope you guys can offer some counsel.

I’m carrying the base trim down a flight of stairs and am having a total brain meltdown over how to deal with and cut the angles so that I might terminate the molding run at the bottom of the stairs with some sort of return.

Below are some pics of the area in question. What I can’t seem to figure out is how to get all the angles to add up and have the ogee at the top of the molding line up correctly. I’ve tried cutting several test pieces but to no avail. I’m not sure, but I’m beginning to think a regular return can’t be done with the style baseboard that I’m using.

Or maybe I’m just not getting it. How’s best to terminate this at the bottom of the stairs where the perpendicular wall meets the edge of the stair skirt other than just painting the cut end?

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo


31 replies so far

View Loren's profile

Loren

10477 posts in 3789 days


#1 posted 12-14-2017 02:48 AM

I might wrap it around the corner and do
a return. Perhaps install a plinth block
under the return to transition into the
adjacent baseboard. The angle at the
bottom will make the molding effectively
wider, so glue an extension to the bottom
of the return or plane the long run to a
slight taper. The mismatch of the profile
at the top should be easy to fudge with
sandpaper and some putty.

At the top you need to either add a plinth
block or use a piece of molding cut at
an angle. Say the overall angle is 60
degrees, then each end has to be 30
degrees for the profiles to line up.

View ColonelTravis's profile

ColonelTravis

1887 posts in 2035 days


#2 posted 12-14-2017 02:49 AM

Did crown molding in almost the entire house earlier this year, I feel your pain. Want to make sure I understand – are you asking how you just end it there? Or are you going to wrap it around the corner?

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firefighterontheside

19027 posts in 1997 days


#3 posted 12-14-2017 02:54 AM

You’ve got to do the same thing at the top as at the bottom. Find the angle and divide it in half. The piece at the bottom will just be a triangle piece that gives you an ogee edge return.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

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Ripper70

1127 posts in 1049 days


#4 posted 12-14-2017 03:39 AM



Did crown molding in almost the entire house earlier this year, I feel your pain. Want to make sure I understand – are you asking how you just end it there? Or are you going to wrap it around the corner?

- ColonelTravis


I am just trying to end it there. I was hoping to do something as pictured below. The stairs were originally carpeted so the skirt is/was a mess and it juts out proud about an inch or two. I put an edge band along the top part of the skirt to hide the plywood edge and would like to just end the molding at the juncture where the wall and skirt meet. I’ll add baseboard to the area at the floor but figured it’d be better (read easier) to make them separate from each other.


You’ve got to do the same thing at the top as at the bottom. Find the angle and divide it in half. The piece at the bottom will just be a triangle piece that gives you an ogee edge return.

- firefighterontheside

The problem there seems to be that when the angle of the top board is too acute the wedge piece won’t fit the profile. With the ogee, it seems, the angle has to be at (or close to) either 45 degrees or 22.5 degrees for them to line up but then it’s not parallel to the adjacent wall.

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo

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Ripper70

1127 posts in 1049 days


#5 posted 12-14-2017 03:44 AM



I might wrap it around the corner and do
a return. Perhaps install a plinth block
under the return to transition into the
adjacent baseboard. The angle at the
bottom will make the molding effectively
wider, so glue an extension to the bottom
of the return or plane the long run to a
slight taper. The mismatch of the profile
at the top should be easy to fudge with
sandpaper and some putty.

At the top you need to either add a plinth
block or use a piece of molding cut at
an angle. Say the overall angle is 60
degrees, then each end has to be 30
degrees for the profiles to line up.

- Loren


This is the board I’ve already fit to the top of the stair run. Fits perfectly. It’s the other end that’s giving me fits. Yours might be the final solution (albeit a complicated one) if I can’t figure a graceful way to figure this out.

Using sandpaper, putty, caulk and anything else I can find is a given. :))

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo

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Loren

10477 posts in 3789 days


#6 posted 12-14-2017 03:49 AM

The angles have to be equal for the ogee
to line up.

I would stick pieces of thin cardboard under
there and trace and cut with scissors until
I had a pattern I could use for the return.

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firefighterontheside

19027 posts in 1997 days


#7 posted 12-14-2017 03:52 AM

It looks like your top piece is cut at 46°, but it needs to be cut at 23°.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

View Loren's profile

Loren

10477 posts in 3789 days


#8 posted 12-14-2017 03:57 AM

So, the angle of the miter on the long molding
should be less acute.

Make a line from the top of the molding to
where it bisects the wall. There you have
an obtuse angle. Figure out what that
angle is and bisect it. I would just draw on
the wall to make it easy to see what the
shapes need to be.

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Loren

10477 posts in 3789 days


#9 posted 12-14-2017 03:58 AM

.

View Ripper70's profile

Ripper70

1127 posts in 1049 days


#10 posted 12-14-2017 04:02 AM



So, the angle of the miter on the long molding
should be less acute.

Make a line from the top of the molding to
where it bisects the wall. There you have
an obtuse angle. Figure out what that
angle is and bisect it. I would just draw on
the wall to make it easy to see what the
shapes need to be.

- Loren


Thanks fellas. I think I understand what you both are suggesting. If the rest of the family wasn’t sleeping right now I’d start hacking up more boards right now. It’ll have to wait until morning. I’ll report back with my results.

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo

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ColonelTravis

1887 posts in 2035 days


#11 posted 12-14-2017 04:09 AM

Yeah just adjust the angles, I think you want something like this?

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firefighterontheside

19027 posts in 1997 days


#12 posted 12-14-2017 04:12 AM

Yes, it’s a bit confusing. Make sure you cut the angle on a long piece and then cut the piece you need off of that one. In other words don’t try to hold a tiny piece on the miter saw and cut it.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

View jerryminer's profile

jerryminer

944 posts in 1582 days


#13 posted 12-14-2017 07:28 AM

Yes, it can be confusing, especially since your protractor reads the ACTUAL angle, but a miter saw gauge reads 90 degrees OFF from the actual angle (90 reads as “0” ...)

Here’s a layout for your angles (based on the 46.2 reading on the digital protractor)

-- Jerry, making sawdust professionally since 1976

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jerryminer

944 posts in 1582 days


#14 posted 12-14-2017 08:54 AM

There’s also this option, but it’s a bit more complicated:

-- Jerry, making sawdust professionally since 1976

View Knockonit's profile

Knockonit

454 posts in 343 days


#15 posted 12-14-2017 03:04 PM



There s also this option, but it s a bit more complicated:

- jerryminer

This is proper way to trim this riser area, unless you use a plinth block, at corner, complicated, but once you do it , will not forget.
good luck with it.
Rj

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