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Need Drill Press Help (What are your best improvements?)

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Forum topic by StumpyNubs posted 03-06-2011 04:19 PM 4565 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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StumpyNubs

6856 posts in 2266 days


03-06-2011 04:19 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question drill-driver

I’ve got a reasonably nice 16 speed floor standing drill press which I am very satisfied with. It’s good BUT it could be great. I’ve seen some really nice, well designed improvements on Lumber Jocks. My question is-

What improvements have you made to your drill press that you REALLY like?

I’m looking for the “perfect” table, the most useful fence system, the most convienient drum sander setup, the most effective dust collection, the most organized storage for bits and the most inventive jigs to get the absolute MOST out of my drill press.

And REMEMBER- This isn’t limited to drill press tables- I know there’s a LOT more you can do with a drill press, so share your jig ideas! (I’ve seen drill press lathes, sanders, etc…)

PLEASE HELP!

-- Subscribe to "Stumpy Nubs Woodworking Journal"- One of the crafts' most unique publications: http://www.stumpynubs.com/


15 replies so far

View ChrisBunker's profile

ChrisBunker

15 posts in 2141 days


#1 posted 03-06-2011 05:32 PM

Definitely a drill press table with fence/hold down clamps and stop block. A new addition for me that I now wish I had made a long time ago.
A key-less chuck for sure. The are some great ones (Rohm) that can be purchased inexpensively and offer much quicker bit changes and higher build quality that the cheapy that came with your press.
I also changed out my drive belts with the link belt type. It did help it run a bit smoother with less vibration.

View Pop's profile

Pop

427 posts in 3412 days


#2 posted 03-06-2011 05:36 PM

Hey Stumpy, If you want the perfect woodworking drill press get a Shopsmith. 1.- Completely variable speeds 700 to 7000 RPM, 2- Fence system with stop “T” 3/4 in. miter slots & stop blocks, 3- “T” 3/4 in. miter grooves in the table & miter gauge, 4- interchangeable inserts including dust collection & drum sanding, 5- forward tilting table with precise forward & back adjustments and best of all 5- it’s a horizontal drill press too. It’s the best feature of this combination machine.

Pop

-- One who works with his hands is a laborer, his hands & head A craftsman, his hands, head & heart a artist

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StumpyNubs

6856 posts in 2266 days


#3 posted 03-06-2011 05:41 PM

Pop- Thanks for the tip, but there’s no way I am going to buy an expensive Shopsmith just for the drill press! (I know shopsmith makes a great system, but I already have a workshop full of machines!) Besides, I already have a good drill press. i just want to “trick it out” as much as possible.

-- Subscribe to "Stumpy Nubs Woodworking Journal"- One of the crafts' most unique publications: http://www.stumpynubs.com/

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StumpyNubs

6856 posts in 2266 days


#4 posted 03-06-2011 05:45 PM

Here’s a good one (by Canadianwoodtick). His table has a feature that allows you to turn the table away and use it to bore into long stock which is held by a verticle table with t-track clamps.

I just want to add more to it- like dust collection, maybe a drawer for bits, and a drum sanding setup.

-- Subscribe to "Stumpy Nubs Woodworking Journal"- One of the crafts' most unique publications: http://www.stumpynubs.com/

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Pop

427 posts in 3412 days


#5 posted 03-06-2011 05:48 PM

Cris, A key-less chuck on a drill press ? I’v never understood why anyone would want this. On a hand drill yea-boy, but on a drill press I want a keyed chuck. When I’m swinging a 3 in. frostner bit I want to tighten that rascal down (all 3 holes) so it stays put. This is real important in vertical depth control.

-- One who works with his hands is a laborer, his hands & head A craftsman, his hands, head & heart a artist

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biglarry

76 posts in 2154 days


#6 posted 03-06-2011 06:32 PM

I have a lot of jigs for my drill press. But the one thing that saves me the most time and I appreciate is a magnet.

I put a magnet, that was laying around, on the side of my press and keep my chuck key on it. It has become second nature to reach for it then put it back, no more looking for the key.

-- "When the going gets tough, switch to power tools." - Red Green

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

4456 posts in 3426 days


#7 posted 03-06-2011 07:25 PM

Uh Oh!!! Biglarry, I see some rust on the DP. That’ll be 5 demerits, and go stand in the corner for 10 minutes.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View richgreer's profile

richgreer

4541 posts in 2540 days


#8 posted 03-06-2011 07:32 PM

I agree with most everything I have read here so I won’t repeat it, but I will add a different idea.

It is good to secure your DP to the floor so that it is stable In general, DPs at top heave with a small footprint. I did not want to drill holes in my concrete floor so I built a bracket that attaches to the wall and holes the top of the DP stable. The picture is not perfect, but you’ll (hopefully) get the idea.

If I ever need to move the DP, I can unbolt 2 bolts and it releases.

It’s nice to know that your DP is as stable as a rock.

-- Rich, Cedar Rapids, IA - I'm a woodworker. I don't create beauty, I reveal it.

View bigike's profile

bigike

4050 posts in 2754 days


#9 posted 03-06-2011 08:21 PM

I built a table but forgot where I got the plans from they do sell them here
http://www.woodstore.net/fedrta.html
but i got them from a magazine.

-- Ike, Big Daddies Woodshop, http://www.icombadaniels@yahoo.com

View biglarry's profile

biglarry

76 posts in 2154 days


#10 posted 03-06-2011 10:01 PM

Bill

I want to thank you for pointing out the rust, I just came in from cleaning and waxing the drill press. I think this time was a better cleaning than standing in the corner.

I’m recovering from knee surgery and I haven’t been in the shop lately and you gave me the incentive to start working in the shop. Last summer I put an addition on my shop but my knee got so bad that after installing the ice shield and tar paper on the roof I wasn’t able to continue. I hire a contractor to put the roof shingles and the siding on the new addition so it is weather tight.

Again I sincerely want to thank Bill. I plan on ordering my electrical so I can get my addition wired

-- "When the going gets tough, switch to power tools." - Red Green

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StumpyNubs

6856 posts in 2266 days


#11 posted 03-06-2011 10:27 PM

I see some dust on the floor Biglarry- Get back out there…

-- Subscribe to "Stumpy Nubs Woodworking Journal"- One of the crafts' most unique publications: http://www.stumpynubs.com/

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ChunkyC

856 posts in 2720 days


#12 posted 03-06-2011 10:54 PM

I agree with Rich. I too didn’t want to drill holes in my concrete floor so I mounted mine to 2 pieces of 3/4 pressure treated ply. It has a nice big foot print now and is much more stable. I think a light breeze would have toppled it before I added the larger base.

-- Chunk's Workshop pictures: http://spadfest.rcspads.com/thumbnails.php?album=135

View Gregn's profile

Gregn

1642 posts in 2449 days


#13 posted 03-07-2011 02:25 AM

If you want the perfect drill press table keep it simple with the ability to change out different jigs and fences quickly. When you use different attachments like a drum sander, mortising attachment, safety planer and general boring tasks you can design the different features needed for each operation.

A rolling cabinet with drawers that sits under the average height of the drill press table would be an asset for storing bits and cutters and other drill press related items. I also agree with stabilizing the drill press to the floor or wall.

-- I don't make mistakes, I have great learning lessons, Greg

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

4456 posts in 3426 days


#14 posted 03-07-2011 05:54 PM

OK Larry. You’re granted a reprieve. I too am recovering from a knee replacement.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

4859 posts in 2279 days


#15 posted 03-07-2011 06:06 PM

https://s3.amazonaws.com/vs-lumberjocks.com/lhp30ud.jpg

https://s3.amazonaws.com/vs-lumberjocks.com/lhp30ct.jpg

https://s3.amazonaws.com/vs-lumberjocks.com/lhp2zsu.jpg

https://s3.amazonaws.com/vs-lumberjocks.com/lhp2z9o.jpg

Here is my version with a storage drawer, dust collection, hold-downs, and stop blocks on the fence. I notched the rear of the fence so it can get very close to the column. It features a hollow dust collection chamber below the table, which allows to use it as a spindle sander (although I havn’t used it since I got my ridgid OSS). Removable inserts are mdf, and help to back up the cuts to eliminate tearout. This allows you to drill wide boards towards the center, and you don’t lose the stated capacity of your drill press.
One thing I would change – use aluminum angle behind the fence, and have a split melamine face. The split wouldn’t have to slide, just space it enough that you can drill close to the edge of a board without the quill hitting the fence.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

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