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Forum topic by RedWoodworker posted 12-13-2017 08:22 PM 2168 views 0 times favorited 43 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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RedWoodworker

34 posts in 307 days


12-13-2017 08:22 PM

Hello all,

I just bought my first tablesaw (cabinet), and am in the market for some jigs. Eventually I hope to build my own, but for now I want to get a couple of store-bought ones to use while I get familiar with the table saw.

I read a good review on here by richgreer about the Rockler Tablesaw CrossCut Sled, so I’m thinking of getting that one. My first project is going to be a simple workbench, so I think I can use this to cut 2×4x8s down to size, and then use it for miters going forward. Any thoughts on this one? http://www.rockler.com/tablesaw-crosscut-sled

Also, are there any other store-bought jigs folks recommend for general table saw use for a beginner? Things that would make more complex-tasks easier, etc.? Other than the workbench I don’t have specific projects in mind yet, I’m just going to see what I can make as my skills improve.

Any thoughts or advice appreciated. Thanks!


43 replies so far

View socrbent's profile

socrbent

629 posts in 2390 days


#1 posted 12-13-2017 08:39 PM

First make one or more push sticks – http://lumberjocks.com/projects/tag/push+sticks
Second make your own crosscut sled. There are many examples on this site. Suggest you start with a simple version and rebuild later to suit your needs as you learn to use the saw.
Third make a mitre sled like this – http://lumberjocks.com/projects/89017

-- socrbent Ohio

View LDO2802's profile

LDO2802

166 posts in 551 days


#2 posted 12-13-2017 09:29 PM

Definitely don’t buy jigs, they are WAY overpriced. Get some Baltic birch and throw one together on the weekend. Countless videos on Youtube on how to make a crosscut sled.

View Shamb3's profile

Shamb3

24 posts in 302 days


#3 posted 12-14-2017 12:33 AM

Digital caliper to help set it up properly.

Build a circular saw guide, so you can make straight cuts when you are breaking down sheet goods for the table saw.
Build a large crosscut sled.

View ca8920's profile

ca8920

145 posts in 1669 days


#4 posted 12-14-2017 01:16 AM

As mentioned above I would make your own jigs and sleds however I would recommend that you pick up one of these magnetic blade alignment devices. Make life much easier. https://goo.gl/MZpB9g. Here’s another type https://goo.gl/H1AWk4.

Chris

-- Chris, Sparks Nevada, https://www.facebook.com/ArmstrongTouch

View Carloz's profile

Carloz

1147 posts in 712 days


#5 posted 12-14-2017 01:27 AM

RedWoodworker,
You have a lot of great advises except this one.
Why the heck one would spend money on this gizmo unless he is to cut bevel of constantly changing odd angles day in day out? A simple drafting square is infinitely more precise, a lot cheaper and can be used for a lot of other tasks around the shop besides setting the blade bevel.
I want to join a choir there and suggest to make your own jigs. For me the most useful was a tenoning jig which doubles as tall fence.


As mentioned above I would make your own jigs and sleds however I would recommend that you pick up one of these magnetic blade alignment devices. Make life much easier. https://goo.gl/MZpB9g. Here s another type https://goo.gl/H1AWk4.

Chris

- ca8920


View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

12340 posts in 2500 days


#6 posted 12-14-2017 01:39 AM

You’ll save yourself a lot of headache buying a good book on shop jigs. This is one:
Classic Joints with Power Tools by Yeung Chan

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View runswithscissors's profile

runswithscissors

2823 posts in 2145 days


#7 posted 12-14-2017 05:00 AM

When you look at the photos of push sticks, notice that some of them would better be called push shoes. Like a shoe, they have a sole that reaches forward, and a heel that hooks over the end of the board so you can push it through. Much safer, as the sole holds down the board, keeps it from rising up as it encounters the blade.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

View jonah's profile

jonah

1838 posts in 3419 days


#8 posted 12-14-2017 05:05 AM



As mentioned above I would make your own jigs and sleds however I would recommend that you pick up one of these magnetic blade alignment devices. Make life much easier. https://goo.gl/MZpB9g. Here s another type https://goo.gl/H1AWk4.

Chris

- ca8920


Please do not use shortened links. People should be able to tell where a link goes without visiting what could be a malicious site.

View Rick S.'s profile

Rick S.

10306 posts in 3153 days


#9 posted 12-14-2017 05:56 AM

A Good Push stick might save you a finger or two!

-- It is not necessary for Some People to turn OFF the LIGHT to be IN the DARK!

View RedWoodworker's profile

RedWoodworker

34 posts in 307 days


#10 posted 12-14-2017 01:35 PM

Thanks everyone for the great advice!

View tomsteve's profile

tomsteve

808 posts in 1339 days


#11 posted 12-14-2017 02:07 PM



A simple drafting square is infinitely more precise, a lot cheaper and can be used for a lot of other tasks around the shop besides setting the blade bevel.

id lay money down that a wixey gage is infinitely more precise then a drafting square.
i have quite a few drating squares, but not one that can set my TS blade at 22.5 degrees. my wixey gage does it precisely.
actually, my drafting squares barely get used since i got the wixey.

View hairy's profile

hairy

2752 posts in 3652 days


#12 posted 12-14-2017 03:21 PM

Take a look here: https://www.incrementaltools.com/Articles.asp?ID=161

This is only 1 example of the many products and companies that make jigs. Look at a lot before you make a decision.

It is not low cost, but it is accurate , repeatable, and quality. If you start out with a homemade sled that isn’t accurate, everything you cut will be wrong. Build your own jigs when you build up the skills to do it right.

I think there are much better ways to cut down 2×4x8’s than a tablesaw.

-- My reality check bounced...

View Carloz's profile

Carloz

1147 posts in 712 days


#13 posted 12-14-2017 03:35 PM

A simple drafting square is infinitely more precise, a lot cheaper and can be used for a lot of other tasks around the shop besides setting the blade bevel.

id lay money down that a wixey gage is infinitely more precise then a drafting square.
i have quite a few drating squares, but not one that can set my TS blade at 22.5 degrees. my wixey gage does it precisely.
actually, my drafting squares barely get used since i got the wixey.

- tomsteve


You’d loose your money.
Your “infinite” is constrained by wixey’s accuracy which is 0.2 degrees or 0.1 degree for more expensive models. It is good for framing work though.

View RedWoodworker's profile

RedWoodworker

34 posts in 307 days


#14 posted 12-14-2017 03:39 PM



Take a look here: https://www.incrementaltools.com/Articles.asp?ID=161

This is only 1 example of the many products and companies that make jigs. Look at a lot before you make a decision.

It is not low cost, but it is accurate , repeatable, and quality. If you start out with a homemade sled that isn t accurate, everything you cut will be wrong. Build your own jigs when you build up the skills to do it right.

I think there are much better ways to cut down 2×4x8 s than a tablesaw.

- hairy

Thanks, Hairy. This is what I was thinking as well, on both counts.

View jonah's profile

jonah

1838 posts in 3419 days


#15 posted 12-14-2017 03:49 PM



Take a look here: https://www.incrementaltools.com/Articles.asp?ID=161

This is only 1 example of the many products and companies that make jigs. Look at a lot before you make a decision.

It is not low cost, but it is accurate , repeatable, and quality. If you start out with a homemade sled that isn t accurate, everything you cut will be wrong. Build your own jigs when you build up the skills to do it right.

I think there are much better ways to cut down 2×4x8 s than a tablesaw.

- hairy


It’s really rather easy to build a crosscut sled that is completely accurate. All you need is a decent framing, try, or combination square. Look up William Ng or Marc Spaguolo’s videos on the subject. The Incra crosscut sled setup is incredibly overpriced, as per usual.

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