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Old wood plane and butt gauge ID questions

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Forum topic by gardenbroad posted 03-07-2011 04:54 AM 2553 views 1 time favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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gardenbroad

5 posts in 2104 days


03-07-2011 04:54 AM

Topic tags/keywords: wood plane butt gauge

Hi! I’m new around here, and I was hoping someone might help me ID these cool old tools I got at a resale shop. The wood planer has “H. Chapin” embossed in the wood on one end, and a “2” embossed on the other end. All of the similar ones I found on the web had a metal blade attached to the sliding thingy, but this one comes to a point at the tip that’s parallel to the planer, as if it were designed to cut a furrow in something softer than wood. Am I way off?
As for the butt gauge, it has “Stanley No. 61” stamped on it, but the sliding part with the wooden screw looks homemade or perhaps original on an older model?

Any information would be greatly appreciated! I’m just getting started collecting tools since receiving my dad’s collection, and unfortunately he’s no longer around to consult with. Thank you all in advace! :)


9 replies so far

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cutmantom

389 posts in 2500 days


#1 posted 03-07-2011 05:10 AM

from what ive herd the h chapin was most likely the owners name, planes were marked for id against theft

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swirt

2118 posts in 2437 days


#2 posted 03-07-2011 06:03 AM

h chapin is a makers mark He made a lot of planes. It is not designed to cut something softer than wood, it is just missing its iron, so the wedge sits deeper in the plane than it would with the iron in place. The number 2 denotes the size of the planes curve

http://www.davistownmuseum.org/bioHermonChapin.html
http://theclampguy.info/hist_ch.htm

The marking gauge seems to have its original thumb screw. I have a Dunlop that looks just like it. The scribing iron on it seems to be set too deep. With it that deep it is hard to get enough of the fence to register on the wood to be marked. The tip of the scribe should only protude 1/16” or so.

-- Galootish log blog, http://www.timberframe-tools.com

View lwllms's profile

lwllms

555 posts in 2746 days


#3 posted 03-07-2011 06:03 AM

H. Chapin was one of the significant American plane makers. I believe the plane is a fluting plane but it may be half of a set of table planes. Table planes cut a rule joint. I haven’t seen any table planes shaped like this so I think it’s a fluting plane.

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gardenbroad

5 posts in 2104 days


#4 posted 03-07-2011 07:36 AM

Thanks so much for the great information everyone, I really appreciate it! :)

View Dave's profile

Dave

11405 posts in 2305 days


#5 posted 03-08-2011 03:46 AM

Did the plane have the iron with it?

-- Superdav "No matter where you go - there you are." http://chiselandforge.com

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gardenbroad

5 posts in 2104 days


#6 posted 03-08-2011 08:05 AM

Hi superdav, It didn’t have the iron with it…is that replaceable? Any idea what either of these might be worth?

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Dave

11405 posts in 2305 days


#7 posted 03-08-2011 02:40 PM

It is but not easy. Ron Hock, Lee Valley or ebay. The plane itself depends on the rarity and maker.

-- Superdav "No matter where you go - there you are." http://chiselandforge.com

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lwllms

555 posts in 2746 days


#8 posted 03-08-2011 04:14 PM

Actually, replacing the iron is pretty easy. Lie-Nielsen sells unhardened tapered iron blanks. Order your replacement by tang width not the width of the bit or lower section. You’ll have to cut the lower section to the proper width. Tang width should be about 2/3 to 3/4 the thickness of the wedge. If you order this way, you’ll have ample width in the bit.

Shaping and hardening the bit is easy but you do need the equipment to do it. Here’s where I need to put in a disclaimer. I have a very small financial interest in the tapered irons Lie-Nielsen sells. They’re based on my work in making molding planes and I get a small royalty on sales. I also get a royalty on the two DVDs Lie-Nielsen sells that cover the information you’ll need to make the irons. Either Sharpening Profiled Hand Tools or Making Traditional Side Escapement Planes will have the information you’re looking for. I’d have to write a book here to cover it all.

Unfortunately, replacing the iron will probably cost as much as the plane is worth. I’d expect $30 to be the high end of what you’d get on a good day. The up side of replacing the iron is that you’ll learn a lot and be a less likely to fall for a lot of the buzz nonsense marketing of hand tools today.

My guess is the marking gauge would bring five or ten dollars, if you’re lucky.

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gardenbroad

5 posts in 2104 days


#9 posted 03-09-2011 04:06 AM

Thank you guys again for the info! There’s a lot of tools for me to go through yet, and I’m inclined to keep the stuff I know Dad used (or whatever I think is cool :) The rest I’ll try and disperse, and it sounds like these two might be good for “altered art” items on Etsy.com or something.

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