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Does anyone have any tips using jointer with large stock?

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Forum topic by bassman2 posted 12-13-2017 06:24 AM 3779 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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bassman2

11 posts in 367 days


12-13-2017 06:24 AM

I picked up a 12” jointer last weekend and I started working my way through a LARGE stack of white oak.

Most of the pieces are over 10’ long and I have a mixture of 5/4 and 2.25” thick stock. Its heavy! Its also cupped and twisted – some of it really badly cupped and twisted.

The bad pieces, I’ve tried to cut out the bad spots – and make a shorter board or boards.. The more straight pieces, my process is to rip it down to 11.75” with a track saw. Cut off any ends that are twisting – and get to work on face jointing.

Thats where I’m having a heck of a time with the longer pieces. Physically wears me out and it seems to take forever.
6’ pieces are MUCH easier to deal with.

What are your suggestions? better in-feed with rollers? (ordered)

Skip the face jointing and put on a planer sled? (time consuming – and I do have a 20” planer and it “could” work)


15 replies so far

View Loren's profile

Loren

10477 posts in 3792 days


#1 posted 12-13-2017 06:44 AM

I typically keep boards in the rough until
I want to use them and then I mark them
with a lumber crayon at lengths I’ll need
and buck them to shorter lengths. I watch
the undulations on the faces of the boards
when doing this too.

Jointing long, heavy boards is made easier
with an outfeed extension table for the jointer.
I made one when I had a Robland XSD. It
added about 30”. I screwed a piece of aluminum
angle to the end of the iron bed and tapped
it for 3 set screws. I drilled 3 corresponding
holes in the extension table for the set screw
heads. Two adjustable legs went on the far end.

View Manitario's profile

Manitario

2631 posts in 3027 days


#2 posted 12-13-2017 06:55 AM

I have a 12” jointer as well, and the only hardwood I have access to is rough…I agree, jointing long boards is exhausting, especially if they are 8/4. I haven’t had much success using rollers; if they are off at all, ie. slightly higher or lower than the jointer bed your board comes out looking like a giant wedge.

What I suggest is really consider what you’re going to use 10’ lumber for; I personally don’t have too many projects where I need a whole bunch of 10’ long boards intact. The other thing to consider is that if you have a 1/2” cup over 10’, by the time you joint it flat, you’ll have lost 1/2” of thickness on the ends, so unless you’re needing really long, thin boards, or unless you’re starting with really thick boards, it makes more sense to start off with them shorter.

Also, I try not to pre-mill my wood until several days b/f I need it; I’ve found that if I flatten a long board and come back 6 months later, often it isn’t flat anymore…

-- Sometimes the creative process requires foul language. -- Charles Neil

View Andre's profile

Andre

2060 posts in 1950 days


#3 posted 12-13-2017 07:20 AM

Yep, keep them rough until you know what length will be required! Had some 12/4 rough birch that I finish on 2 sides just to see what the grain pattern looked like(beautiful) knocked them down to under 12” so they fit and almost hurt myself manhandling them! They were only 7’ long!
Usually do rough dimension on bandsaw so reduces amount of waste and helps with squaring.

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

View kaerlighedsbamsen's profile

kaerlighedsbamsen

1250 posts in 1857 days


#4 posted 12-13-2017 08:19 AM

If you dont already make sure to use a sliding compund on the jointer. Makes a huge difference

-- "Do or Do not. There is no try." - Yoda

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

4490 posts in 2453 days


#5 posted 12-13-2017 09:31 AM



If you dont already make sure to use a sliding compund on the jointer. Makes a huge difference

- kaerlighedsbamsen


I don’t get it.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View Gilley23's profile

Gilley23

489 posts in 526 days


#6 posted 12-13-2017 10:57 AM

Wax the surfaces.

I don t get it.

- AlaskaGuy


View Aj2's profile

Aj2

1716 posts in 1942 days


#7 posted 12-13-2017 02:59 PM

I also agree with waxing the beds and saving the boards rough till you need them.
There is more then one reason to face long boards. Its good to see the grain. So you know what to work with. If you have straight knives in your jointer like I do you can get the job done in one or two passes.
Unlike a jointer with a Bryd head that can hardly take a 1/32 pass.I can take a 3/16 pass no problem in 12 inch wide face of hickory. Just takes some elbow grease. And wax

-- Aj

View runswithscissors's profile

runswithscissors

2843 posts in 2169 days


#8 posted 12-14-2017 05:25 AM

Get a helper for assistance with the more difficult planks.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

View wuddoc's profile

wuddoc

313 posts in 3862 days


#9 posted 12-14-2017 05:38 AM

We use a Grizzly 1/4HP power feeder because the 8” jointer power feeder (Facer) is no longer available. You may wish to look at this power feeder (Facer) for 12” Jointers if your going to face a lot of lumber.

http://www.shopgearinc.com/products/co-matic-power-feeders/af114j-jointerfeeder.php

and

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bc5qjSE5KMQ&t=49s

-- Wuddoc

View bassman2's profile

bassman2

11 posts in 367 days


#10 posted 12-14-2017 05:49 AM

I didn’t know a power feeder was a thing… hmm..

I did find a place in Portland that will possibly handle all of my larger slabs. The larger stuff is 2.5” thick, 24+” wide, and 14’ long. I’ve got more than 2 dozen slabs … more like 4 dozen.

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

7770 posts in 3058 days


#11 posted 12-14-2017 01:41 PM

When I was building my ~8ft long workbench, I would joint the 8/4 Ash only enough to be able to run it through my lunchbox planer. Taking minimal cuts per pass, I quickly got parallel sides and returned to the jointer for a 90-degree right angle before ripping the stock for laminating the top of the workbench. I would then return to the planer and send the 12in. wide x 90in. x 3in. though. Infeed and outfeed ramps are a must.

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View SweetTea's profile

SweetTea

360 posts in 804 days


#12 posted 12-15-2017 01:16 AM



We use a Grizzly 1/4HP power feeder because the 8” jointer power feeder (Facer) is no longer available. You may wish to look at this power feeder (Facer) for 12” Jointers if your going to face a lot of lumber.

http://www.shopgearinc.com/products/co-matic-power-feeders/af114j-jointerfeeder.php

and

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bc5qjSE5KMQ&t=49s

- wuddoc

No way I would spend $2,000 on a 1/4HP power feeder. I know that this is pretty much the only player in the game when it comes to power feeders made specifically for use on jointers, but with a little creativity you can get a 1/4HP Grizzly power feeder mounted on just about any jointer with their universal mounting plate and be out less than $700. Plus that expensive Co-Matic feeder doesn’t have rubber rollers. Instead it has a drum with spikes on it that leave small divots in the wood that you have to later plane out.

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

4490 posts in 2453 days


#13 posted 12-15-2017 01:25 AM

What are you building that you need to prep so many large pieces of lumber?

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View bassman2's profile

bassman2

11 posts in 367 days


#14 posted 12-15-2017 02:38 AM

That is one nice workbench!! Looks great!

We are in the finishing stages of a custom house… We’re using three large planks 12’ and 13’ long in the master closet to create a U shaped bench – that all the other closet shelves partially sit on…and it all acts as a bench below the hanging sections…It’s a huge closet.

Another plank is for a bar top that will go behind a sectional in the great room. A great place to sit, drink a beer and watch a game.

I’m getting 2 more large planks planed out – for a mud room bench and possibly in a super nice work bench / desk.

I have more big planks – but we’re cutting those down to make custom stair treads that fit on a Iron beam staircase. If i can figure out pics here…without photo bucket – I’ll post some pics.

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

7770 posts in 3058 days


#15 posted 12-16-2017 08:00 PM

Sounds like Loren explains how to build an extension for the jointer. Worth considering. In my case, I used adjustable roller stands which have multiple duties. I would say nix any ideas about power feeders and such, just not needed.

With a little ingenuity, you can get by with a lot less. Believe it or not, I ran those laminated top pieces through my 13in Ridgid R4300 planer. Had to help it along, but if you do minimum cut passes things will work out. Good luck!...

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

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