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Homemade Router Insert Plates

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Forum topic by GreenNewbie posted 03-04-2011 05:21 PM 17386 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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GreenNewbie

8 posts in 2106 days


03-04-2011 05:21 PM

Topic tags/keywords: router router table

I’m in the initial phases of starting to come up with a design for a home made router table. In the readings I have done, there are a number of people that suggest using 1/4” hardboard for the insert plate. My question is, will this be strong enough to support the weight of the router? Or, should one really go and spend the cash on the aluminum (or other materials) one. Also, any suggestions on where to pick them up for a cheap price would be greatly appreciated. Also, if anyone has a great router table plan, I would love to see it.


15 replies so far

View Rick  Dennington's profile

Rick Dennington

5180 posts in 2659 days


#1 posted 03-04-2011 05:48 PM

Greetings GreenNewbie, I would NOT even think about using 1/4” hardboard…..it will not hold up under the weight of a router. It
will sag badly over time. If I was going to make an insert (which I have before several times), I would use 3/8 ” Lexan, if you you don’t want to put out the bucks for a metal plate. You could get by with a 1/4” Lexan, but 3/8” is better and stronger. I would still opt for a good aluminum plate like Rockler, Kreg, Bench Dog, etc. You’ll be better off in the long haul by going that route, and won’t have problems with it sagging, even under the weight of a heavy 3 1/4hp router like a Hitachi M12V or Porter Cable or Triton….. If you’re looking for router plans, the NYW plans re available, and you can find other plans from Plans Now that are downloadable.

-- At my age, an "all--nighter" is not having to get up and pee...!!!

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GreenNewbie

8 posts in 2106 days


#2 posted 03-04-2011 06:02 PM

Yeah, that is my fear as well. I’m going to be buying the Triton router this weekend once it goes on sale (and I know that one is heavy). So, I just want to make sure it will hold up over time!!!

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Scott Bryan

27251 posts in 3287 days


#3 posted 03-04-2011 07:10 PM

GreenNewbie, I agree with Rick’s comment. In my table I have a DeWalt 625 which weighs in at just over 11 pounds. It is mounted on a 3/8” Lexan plate and I still have some sagging (about 25 thousandths of an inch) across the insert. I definitely would stay away from using 1/4” hardboard.

-- Challenges are what make life interesting; overcoming them is what makes life meaningful- Joshua Marine

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Loren

8310 posts in 3113 days


#4 posted 03-04-2011 07:38 PM

I think you may be confused about the use of hardboard in
router tables. It’s often used in shop-made tables as an
zero-clearance insert around the bit.

What you do is rout and square a 1/4” deep hole in your router
table top and then you can switch out different hardboard
inserts for different bit diameters.

This type of router table is the kind where you take piece of melamine
or plywood, screw the router base to the bottom, make a hole for
the bit, and off you go.

View Rick  Dennington's profile

Rick Dennington

5180 posts in 2659 days


#5 posted 03-04-2011 09:40 PM

I don’t think he was that confused….he didn’t mention anything about inserts…he said router plate. That’s what he asked…... My question is: “Will this be strong enough to support the weight of the router?

-- At my age, an "all--nighter" is not having to get up and pee...!!!

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surfin2

51276 posts in 2601 days


#6 posted 03-04-2011 10:41 PM

Go with the 1/4 aluminum plate you won’t regret it…

-- Rick

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ScottN

261 posts in 2145 days


#7 posted 03-05-2011 02:21 AM

I’m not really sure you should jump on Loren… “Homemade Router Insert Plates” has me wondering. notice the plural

Welcome Green newbie. Maybe you can elaborate?

-- New Auburn,WI

View surfin2's profile

surfin2

51276 posts in 2601 days


#8 posted 03-05-2011 02:52 AM

My question is, will this be strong enough to support the weight of the router?

Not rocket science…

-- Rick

View mainwoodworks's profile

mainwoodworks

112 posts in 2113 days


#9 posted 03-05-2011 02:56 AM

I like the 3/8” Lexan for the plate. Just make it as small as practical for it too will sag. My next table top will be a torsion box construction. I expect it will be a bit thick and can cause a few problems. At the moment I have a store bought plastic insert in a wooden table top that is already starting to sag. The top before that was a 1” thick plywood top with a 1/4” alum. insert which lasted me around 20 yrs. and yes there was sagging to the point that I had to get rid of the top. I even had sticks wedged under the middle of the table just to get by.

-- Measure twice, cut once, and hope for the best.

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surfin2

51276 posts in 2601 days


#10 posted 03-05-2011 03:04 AM

1” thick plywood top with a 1/4” alum. insert which lasted me around 20 yrs. and yes there was sagging to the point that I had to get rid of the top

I think a table top should have the bottom laminated also to prevent sagging…

-- Rick

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GreenNewbie

8 posts in 2106 days


#11 posted 03-05-2011 03:07 AM

Thanks for all of the advice, and I was already thinking that it won’t work. I got the idea from the Woodsmith Shop (http://www.woodsmithshop.com/download/303/routertable.pdf). I think I will be looking for an alternative solution (whether it’s a home made one or a boughten one).

View bigike's profile

bigike

4050 posts in 2754 days


#12 posted 03-05-2011 03:29 AM

just mt the router to the table top this way you have no worries about the insert sagging over time also there is no leveling of a plate to worrie about. I would go with the router table from new yankee workshop
http://www.newyankee.com/getproduct.php?0301

-- Ike, Big Daddies Woodshop, http://www.icombadaniels@yahoo.com

View surfin2's profile

surfin2

51276 posts in 2601 days


#13 posted 03-05-2011 03:39 AM

Mounting the router to the table limits the height you can raise the bit…

At first it seems no big deal til the occasion arrives you need that little bit…

I went through that with the first RT I made from plans from Popular Science…

-- Rick

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Resurrected

671 posts in 2157 days


#14 posted 03-05-2011 06:43 AM

Thick plate 1/4 or bigger thicker table 3/4 X 2 Rick D had it right.

-- Who can I block now???????????????????????

View DHaden's profile

DHaden

77 posts in 2124 days


#15 posted 03-11-2011 06:54 PM

I made mine from 3/4 MDF top sides and back. I am going to add an insert for the very reason surfin2 mentioned. I looked at this site (http://www.grainger.com/Grainger/ecatalog/N-1z0ntwp/Ntt-phenolic+sheet) for the material I plan on using. Take a look at the table I made and that I posted (http://lumberjocks.com/projects/45760)

-- Measure once, cut twice.

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