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Advice mounting planer

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Forum topic by Zod posted 12-08-2017 09:56 PM 790 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Zod

24 posts in 323 days


12-08-2017 09:56 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question workbench planer small shop outfeed

I am pretty new to building things and was hoping to get some advice on mounting a planer to a workbench. I started out small and this weekend should be finished with my largest project, a basic workbench (2ft x 8ft on the top/bottom surfaces). I am working out of a garage and am somewhat limited on space. I was able to get a DeWalt 734 planer and am trying to figure out how to arrange things. My question is – Does it make sense to mount the planer to the bottom of my workbench, which would also serve as an outfeed table for the planer? I have looked around online but haven’t seen anybody arrange the planer with a left/right orientation. I thought it would be nice to have that bottom of the bench as a planer outfeed but was wondering if there was a reason this wouldn’t make sense. I actually get the planer in about a week so I can take a closer look then. But if anybody has insight on whether this works or not, I would love to hear your thoughts.

Hopefully my description makes sense


18 replies so far

View JBrow's profile

JBrow

1366 posts in 1064 days


#1 posted 12-11-2017 02:48 AM

Zod,

Your description sounds as if your workbench has a shelf (bottom the workbench). In this case, I would think the planer would be too low. It would be uncomfortable to use and stock that has been run through the planer would be difficult to retrieve. These issues could make planning a real chore.

If your idea is to mount the planer so that the workbench surface acts as the planer’s out-feed table, then it makes sense to me. The issues I see with this configuration are that if the planer is mounted on the end of the workbench for an 8’ outfeed surface, the workbench would be almost 10’ long. If mounted on a side of the workbench for a 2’ outfeed table, perhaps near one end, there would be less support for longer stock and the workbench would become about 4’ wide. I often have items setting on the workbench when I need to do some planning. If this occurs in your shop, those items would have to be cleared away. It would be easier to make room for a planer operation if the planer is mounted on the workbench edge rather than the end. Mounted on either the end or edge of the workbench could leave the planer in the way from time to time as you need to move around to the other side of the workbench

Whichever mounting option selected, ensuring the planer and its supporting structure can be easily and quickly removed from the workbench would come in handy from time to time.

Notwithstanding my comments, whatever makes sense in your workshop and for the work you do is the way to go. Even if you mount the planer to the workbench but it does not work out, you can always reconfigure things. Shops tend to evolve as tools are added and more complex projects are undertaken.

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

7770 posts in 3058 days


#2 posted 12-11-2017 11:23 AM

Several years ago I built my planer table out of a 3/4in sheet of plywood:


http://lumberjocks.com/projects/34959

And THEN several years later, I added a rolling cabinet to put the planer table onto:

And the final cabinet ended up being 24in x 24in x 8ft, a real monster… ;-)
Bottom line is that you might consider something similar (sized to your needs). Do note that my “planer table” is just setting on this cabinet(call it a workbench in your case) and can be lifted right off when needing the workbench for other needs…

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View mrg's profile

mrg

828 posts in 3143 days


#3 posted 12-11-2017 11:46 AM

That planer is light enough to move around easy enough. I would either store it under your bench and pick it up and put on top when I want to use it or build a cart to roll it out of a corner.

-- mrg

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

4986 posts in 2495 days


#4 posted 12-11-2017 01:54 PM

I’d put it on a cart with wheels and get it up to a convenient height. That way you can shove it out of the way easily when not using it. Planers are heavy and it gets old lifting them to move them around and bending over to work them on the floor. The 734 weighs 80 lbs.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View Mike_D_S's profile

Mike_D_S

482 posts in 2358 days


#5 posted 12-11-2017 02:33 PM

Zod,

I’d suggest looking at a combination of flip top cart and workbench. There are a lot of designs for flip top carts you can check out. If you combine this with your workbench, then you get a planer that flips out of the way when you need flat space, but uses the workbench top for infeed/outfeed when needed.

Imagine HorizontalMike’s bench, but make the middle a flip top section with the planer bolted on one side and the other just flat bench. You’d have to make the flip part a bit thicker so the other side lines up when flipped, but might serve your two goals.

I have the 734 and while it technically be “light” enough to be portable, I definitely got tired out of moving mine around before I built a dedicated cart for it.

Here’s a flip top concept that I like. Not exactly what you’ll need, but a starter idea.
http://lumberjocks.com/projects/53211

Thanks,
Mike

-- No honey, that's not new, I've had that forever......

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

2517 posts in 1531 days


#6 posted 12-11-2017 02:48 PM

As already mentioned, using the workbench as an outfeed support would be a pain because you have to clear the surface to use it. Also, because you need equal space on both sides, it will make it difficult if you need to plane a longer piece than usual making it not very flexible. It may also turn out to be in the way when using your bench for larger pieces. My solution was to buy a cheap Harbor Freight stand, make a mobile base for it and use roller stands for support.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View Zod's profile

Zod

24 posts in 323 days


#7 posted 12-11-2017 04:02 PM

Thanks for the ideas. I ended up mounting it on the bottom, with a front/back orientation. I am ok with it being low for the time being since I have to conserve on space and I won’t be using it every day. I might make some kind of outfeed support later.

Since space is an issue, I am strongly considering some kind of mobile fliptop stand for my router table/jointer. I have a 8” Cutech benchtop jointer with retracting supports so doesn’t take up much room (still haven’t got it setup yet). It would be great to have both of those take up the same footprint. I will get a few pics later when I’m home. This bench is the biggest thing I have built and there are a lot of errors and imperfections. There are a few things I am considering fixing but I figure it is just a workbench and if I see them all the time, it will help to remind me not to make those mistakes again.

My wife has found some things on Pinterest that she wants me to build but I think I will need to keep making things to get my “shop” setup before tackling indoor furniture projects. I was working off of a small folding work station so this bench should make a big difference for me.

View Zod's profile

Zod

24 posts in 323 days


#8 posted 12-11-2017 04:08 PM



Several years ago I built my planer table out of a 3/4in sheet of plywood:


http://lumberjocks.com/projects/34959

And THEN several years later, I added a rolling cabinet to put the planer table onto:

And the final cabinet ended up being 24in x 24in x 8ft, a real monster… ;-)
Bottom line is that you might consider something similar (sized to your needs). Do note that my “planer table” is just setting on this cabinet(call it a workbench in your case) and can be lifted right off when needing the workbench for other needs…

- HorizontalMike

This is really clever. The ingenuity in this community is impressive, and inspiring. Problem-solving at it’s finest.

View ChefHDAN's profile

ChefHDAN

1131 posts in 2993 days


#9 posted 12-11-2017 05:45 PM

Zod, really suggest you build it as you need it, especially if space is at a premium. Since you’ve got bench-top tools I’d recommend that you use your lower shelf for storing the tools and then have a universal equipment stand that you can put the tools onto as you need them. I get ALOT of use out of the older style Black & Decker workmates, that I can usually find on Craig's List for around $20 I have the 735, and it is mounted onto a piece of 3/4” ply with a 2×4 cleat on the bottom and regularly lives on a rolling floor dolly. For quick jobs, I just roll it under the wing on the table saw and run a few BF through it. For larger jobs I set up a workmate and then the 2×4 cleat is clamped into the work top. The key attribute is to keep your space versatile, you’ll be amazed how fast you can accumulate tools and gear, things that get used the most should be prioritized for bench space

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

View Craftsman on the lake's profile

Craftsman on the lake

2810 posts in 3581 days


#10 posted 12-11-2017 06:02 PM

Actually… I have the dw734 mounted on a cart so I can pull it out. I’ve put 8 ft boards through it and find that the wings will support the board just fine. No need for infeed/outfeed tables for it. My suggestion? Put it on a cart about the size of the planer. Put wheels on the cart. Put it against the wall and pull it out when you need it for longer stuff.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

View MT_Stringer's profile

MT_Stringer

3173 posts in 3375 days


#11 posted 12-11-2017 06:02 PM

I built a cart for mine. I store the 4 inch hose underneath it.

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

View Zod's profile

Zod

24 posts in 323 days


#12 posted 12-11-2017 06:08 PM



Zod, really suggest you build it as you need it, especially if space is at a premium. Since you ve got bench-top tools I d recommend that you use your lower shelf for storing the tools and then have a universal equipment stand that you can put the tools onto as you need them. I get ALOT of use out of the older style Black & Decker workmates, that I can usually find on Craig s List for around $20 I have the 735, and it is mounted onto a piece of 3/4” ply with a 2×4 cleat on the bottom and regularly lives on a rolling floor dolly. For quick jobs, I just roll it under the wing on the table saw and run a few BF through it. For larger jobs I set up a workmate and then the 2×4 cleat is clamped into the work top. The key attribute is to keep your space versatile, you ll be amazed how fast you can accumulate tools and gear, things that get used the most should be prioritized for bench space

- ChefHDAN

Thanks. You are definitely right. Our garage is packed full of things and I need to get everything organized and save space where I can. The workbench was a big first step. My Delta 36-725 is new in box and I am hoping to get that up this weekend. As I work at setting things up, my wife is getting impatient because I’m not focused on her projects :) I live in the Phoenix area and once the summer hits, spending time out there is not very fun. So I want to get done what I can out there while it is only 68 degrees.

View EarlS's profile

EarlS

1617 posts in 2492 days


#13 posted 12-11-2017 06:42 PM

Zod – While I realize IA summer heat isn’t as bad as Phoenix, I did manage to talk my wife into letting me buy a window A/C unit to “keep the humidity down” so the wood wouldn’t swell and such in the summer and so I could work on some projects through the summer.

As for a planer set up, I have mine on a cart and I use rollers for the in/out feed supports. Since you can only plane one board at a time I didn’t see the need for a big complicated in-feed and outfeed table. I tried it that way when I first started planning my own lumber but it was way too complicated to make sure everything was level, flush, smooth, so I went low tech and simple.

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

View Zod's profile

Zod

24 posts in 323 days


#14 posted 12-11-2017 07:30 PM



Zod – While I realize IA summer heat isn t as bad as Phoenix, I did manage to talk my wife into letting me buy a window A/C unit to “keep the humidity down” so the wood wouldn t swell and such in the summer and so I could work on some projects through the summer.

As for a planer set up, I have mine on a cart and I use rollers for the in/out feed supports. Since you can only plane one board at a time I didn t see the need for a big complicated in-feed and outfeed table. I tried it that way when I first started planning my own lumber but it was way too complicated to make sure everything was level, flush, smooth, so I went low tech and simple.

- EarlS

I would definitely go for a portable AC unit. It can get over 120 degrees and it’s pretty draining to be out for any extended period of time. I am only 41 but it feels like I get less and less tolerant of heat as I get older. A small AC unit would at least take a bite out of that.

Thanks for the advice. I think you are right about not making things too complicated. I think I need to remember that I don’t need to do everything upfront. Just adjust as I need to.

View bilyo's profile

bilyo

334 posts in 1246 days


#15 posted 12-11-2017 08:15 PM

I needed my Dewalt 734 to roll under my TS outfeed table when not in use. So, here is my version of the flip top stand:

I use my TS right wing extension for an infeed and a roller stand for an outfeed for longer pieces.
This doesn’t answer your primary question, but maybe will give you some ideas.

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