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Forum topic by jerkylips posted 12-08-2017 05:34 PM 1300 views 1 time favorited 33 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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jerkylips

394 posts in 2535 days


12-08-2017 05:34 PM

It seems like any time I see references to quarter sawn lumber, it’s oak. I’ve never seen any “quarter sawn maple” projects. Is there a reason that other species aren’t cut this way? Just curious..


33 replies so far

View gargey's profile

gargey

956 posts in 740 days


#1 posted 12-08-2017 05:55 PM

If you quartersaw maple the angle of the cuts releases demons that are stored in the wood cells, its not safe.

Obviously, oak doesn’t have any demons in it.

Also, quartersawn (white) oak reveals prominent ray flecks that provide a lot of visual interest, so oak is often cut and advertised that way.

Any wood can be quartersawn – it provides a different look (more uniform vs cathedral grain), and also different wood movement properties that are usually preferred. It is more difficult and more costly.

View Rich's profile

Rich

2633 posts in 554 days


#2 posted 12-08-2017 05:56 PM

I have quarter sawn cherry, sapele and wenge out in the shop. White oak is the classic though. It’s what pops into most people’s head when they hear quarter sawn.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

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Rich

2633 posts in 554 days


#3 posted 12-08-2017 05:58 PM


If you quartersaw maple the angle of the cuts releases demons that are stored in the wood cells, its not safe.

- gargey

What about my cherry, etc? Are there demons, or is it just maple? Maybe I should play it safe and burn it.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

View radiobuzz's profile

radiobuzz

6 posts in 135 days


#4 posted 12-08-2017 05:58 PM

Sapele, zebrawood ant other are often quater sawn. To show a distinctive pattern.

Oak when quatersawn show some desired figures, i think thats why

I think that quater sawn not common even if more stable because it results in a lot of loose.

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

4045 posts in 2274 days


#5 posted 12-08-2017 06:05 PM

A quick search reveals there are plenty of place to buy 1/4 sawn maple. One place even says it a favorite of instrument makers.

http://www.bellforestproducts.com/quarter-sawn-maple/

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View MrFid's profile

MrFid

874 posts in 1869 days


#6 posted 12-08-2017 06:08 PM

Quartersawn white oak (any oak, but especially white) looks very different when QS as opposed to flatsawn or riftsawn. It is desirable for that quality. Most woods don’t look very drastically different when QS. There is some different grain patterning associated with the different cuts, but in general it takes a bit of a trained eye to tell (which many of us around here have, but few others).
The biggest reason to quartersaw lumber is because it adds a lot of stability to the wood. The lumber will expand and contract mostly along its width, rather than its length. This is helpful in lots of applications. However, if a species is very stable to begin with, then quartersawing doesn’t add as much value to the wood. And it matters because when you saw a log into lumber, the most efficient way to saw doesn’t yield much QS lumber. Example: A log might be able to yield 8 boards of QS lumber, or 14 boards, some of which are QS, some flatsawn, and some riftsawn. If you can sell 14 boards rather than 8 with the same log, most people will do that.

-- Bailey F - Eastern Mass.

View jerkylips's profile

jerkylips

394 posts in 2535 days


#7 posted 12-08-2017 06:44 PM



If you quartersaw maple the angle of the cuts releases demons that are stored in the wood cells, its not safe.

Obviously, oak doesn t have any demons in it.

Ahh….maple demons. Makes sense.. The ghost of Aunt Jemima, maybe?

View Rich's profile

Rich

2633 posts in 554 days


#8 posted 12-08-2017 07:02 PM


Ahh….maple demons. Makes sense.. The ghost of Aunt Jemima, maybe?

- jerkylips

I think Aunt Jemima would only be involved if there was a wood species called high fructose corn syrup :)

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

4682 posts in 2316 days


#9 posted 12-08-2017 07:27 PM

Sycamore has the best figure when quarter sawn.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View ArtMann's profile

ArtMann

932 posts in 781 days


#10 posted 12-08-2017 08:18 PM

I persuaded my sawyer to cut and dry some quarter sawn Sycamore for boxes and other small items and it is truly beautiful. He had a hard time with it and said he wouldn’t be doing that again. I don’t know why. Quarter sawn Cherry can have a similar pattern to Sycamore but not always.

View avsmusic1's profile

avsmusic1

246 posts in 650 days


#11 posted 12-08-2017 08:28 PM


What about my cherry, etc? Are there demons, or is it just maple? Maybe I should play it safe and burn it.

- Rich


Burning it just angers them. Better play it safe and just send it my way

View jdh122's profile

jdh122

995 posts in 2782 days


#12 posted 12-08-2017 08:28 PM

QS beech has nice figure too, looks different from flawsawn.

-- Jeremy, in the Acadian forests

View jerkylips's profile

jerkylips

394 posts in 2535 days


#13 posted 12-08-2017 10:52 PM


Ahh….maple demons. Makes sense.. The ghost of Aunt Jemima, maybe?

- jerkylips

I think Aunt Jemima would only be involved if there was a wood species called high fructose corn syrup :)

You make a valid point…

- Rich


View fuigb's profile

fuigb

475 posts in 2922 days


#14 posted 12-08-2017 11:03 PM

When I’m making my own I almost always quartersaw for the sake of stability. Dunno for certain if it helps but it certainly helps to give some wood a nice pop. Maple, sycamore, and cherry have all come out well. When I tried with apple I ruined a blade but that was my fault.

-- - Crud. Go tell your mother that I need a Band-aid.

View Tony_S's profile

Tony_S

857 posts in 3048 days


#15 posted 12-08-2017 11:35 PM

Any Quarter Sawn lumber(called vertical grain in softwoods) will be far more stable than Flat Sawn, due to the growth rings being perpendicular to the face of the board vs. semi parallel to the face. One drawback is quarter sawn lumber can have a lot more bow than flat sawn. Usually not a problem except for longer lengths(more waste).

The reasons for quarter sawn lumber not being readily available in most species is a combination of a couple of simple factors.
More time and waste when sawing a log which raises the end cost.
and truthfully….’most’ Q sawn lumber is boring to look at comparatively speaking vs. a flat sawn cathedral grain.
People don’t want to pay more…for less.
It has it’s place though, especially in modern, and some contemporary Architectural mill work.

-- It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it. Aristotle

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