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Black oak

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Forum topic by Justin posted 03-06-2008 06:07 AM 1509 views 1 time favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Justin

36 posts in 2412 days


03-06-2008 06:07 AM

I have an opportunity to by Black oak for a $1.00 a foot. The wood ranges in size from 6” to 12” wide and all different lengths. My question is, What is black oak. You hear all about red and white but why not black. Is there something wrong with it? Should it be quarter sawn or is it ok to just plain sawn it? Just looking for some input.

Justin


13 replies so far

View Splinters's profile

Splinters

189 posts in 2838 days


#1 posted 03-06-2008 06:21 AM

hadn’t seen any myself…but found this link which talks about it..Is it actually black? Wonder what it is like to work with…

-- Splinters - Living and Loving life in the Rockies - http://www.splinterswoodworks.com/ - http://www.etsy.com/shop.php?user_id=5220040

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Justin

36 posts in 2412 days


#2 posted 03-06-2008 06:24 AM

From what I read other places is that it is yellowish. Thats what I really want to know, how does it look and how is it to work with.

Justin

PS this is eastern black oak, not sure if theres a difference or not.

View GaryK's profile

GaryK

10262 posts in 2643 days


#3 posted 03-06-2008 06:33 AM

Is that a board foot? For that price I would buy some just to check it out myself.

-- Gary - Never pass up the opportunity to make a mistake look like you planned it that way - Tyler, TX

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Splinters

189 posts in 2838 days


#4 posted 03-06-2008 07:01 AM

another link

-- Splinters - Living and Loving life in the Rockies - http://www.splinterswoodworks.com/ - http://www.etsy.com/shop.php?user_id=5220040

View Ethan Sincox's profile

Ethan Sincox

765 posts in 2829 days


#5 posted 03-06-2008 07:08 AM

Black oak is in the red oak family (there is a great, though very non-PC, technique for telling which family an oak tree is in; if it has pointed leaves, like the tip of an arrow, it is in the red (as in redskin, or indian) family; if it has rounded leaves, like an old musket ball, then it is in the white (as in whiteman) family.

I think I got that from Chris Schwartz.

Anyway, it is supposed to be a lower-quality red oak. It is supposed to have some checking problems when drying, so I’d take a good look at the lumber to make sure a lot of it doesn’t have checks throughout.

That aside, I guess it all depends on how much you like working with oak. If you don’t really care for it, then I wouldn’t spend too much money on it, no matter what the cost, you know?

But if you like working with it, and can afford to get some, then buy it.

-- Ethan, http://thekiltedwoodworker.com

View Daren Nelson's profile

Daren Nelson

767 posts in 2560 days


#6 posted 03-06-2008 01:17 PM

Black oak is one of the prettiest of the oaks when it is 1/4 sawn, bigger/more ray flecks than many species.

-- http://nelsonwoodworks.biz/

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HallTree

5661 posts in 2422 days


#7 posted 03-06-2008 11:18 PM

I read years ago that there are about 57 types of oaks

-- "Hold on to instruction, do not let it go; guard it well, for it is your life" Solomon

View teenagewoodworker's profile

teenagewoodworker

2727 posts in 2423 days


#8 posted 03-06-2008 11:22 PM

I’d say get at least some. that sounds like a pretty good price. otherwise i don’t know much about black oak.

View Daren Nelson's profile

Daren Nelson

767 posts in 2560 days


#9 posted 03-07-2008 03:15 AM

”I read years ago that there are about 57 types of oaks” Well I think you were thinking Heinz 57 ;) Here are some of the red/white there are also “intermediate” oaks

The red oaks (synonym sect. Erythrobalanus). North, Central & South America. Styles long, acorns mature in 18 months, very bitter, inside of acorn shell woolly.

  • Quercus acerifolia – Maple-leaved Oak or Mapleleaf Oak # – south central North America
  • Quercus agrifolia – Coast Live Oak # – California, northern Baja California
  • Quercus arkansana – Arkansas Oak – Southeastern North America
  • Quercus buckleyi – Buckley Oak – southwestern North America
  • Quercus canbyi – Canby Oak or Mexican Red Oak # – Mexico
  • Quercus coccinea – Scarlet Oak – eastern North America
  • Quercus costaricensis – Costa Rica, Panama
  • Quercus cualensis – Mexico (Sierra Madre del Sur)
  • Quercus depressa – Mexico
  • Quercus eduardii – Mexico
  • Quercus ellipsoidalis – Northern Pin Oak – eastern North America
  • Quercus emoryi – Emory Oak – southwestern U.S., northern Mexico
  • Quercus falcata – Southern Red Oak or Spanish Oak – southeastern North America
  • Quercus gravesii – Chisos Red Oak – Mexico, southwestern North America (Texas)
  • Quercus graciliformis – # – Extreme SW North America
  • Quercus georgiana – Georgia Oak – southeastern North America
  • Quercus hirtifolia – Mexico
  • Quercus hintoniorum – Mexico
  • Quercus humboldtii – South American Oak # – northern South America
  • Quercus hypoleucoides – Silverleaf Oak # – southwestern North America
  • Quercus hypoxantha – Mexico
  • Quercus ilicifolia – Bear Oak – eastern North America
  • Quercus iltisii – Southern Mexico
  • Quercus imbricaria – Shingle Oak – eastern North America
  • Quercus incana – Bluejack Oak – southeastern North America
  • Quercus inopina – # – southeastern North America
  • Quercus kelloggii – California Black Oak – California, sw. Oregon
  • Quercus laevis – American Turkey Oak – southeastern North America
  • Quercus laurifolia – Laurel Oak # – southeastern North America
  • Quercus laurina – Mexico
  • Quercus marilandica – Blackjack Oak – eastern North America
  • Quercus myrtifolia – Myrtle Oak – southeastern North America
  • Quercus nigra – Water Oak # – eastern North America
  • Quercus palustris – Pin Oak – eastern North America
  • Quercus parvula – Island Scrub Oak – California offshore islands
  • Quercus phellos – Willow Oak – eastern North America
  • Quercus pumila – Runner Oak – southeastern North America
  • Quercus rhysophylla – Loquat-leaf Oak # – Mexico
  • Quercus rubra – Northern Red Oak – eastern North America
  • Quercus salicifolia – Mexico
  • Quercus sapotaefolia – # – Central America
  • Quercus shumardii – Shumard Oak – southeastern North America
  • Quercus tardifolia – Lateleaf Oak – Extreme s. Texas
  • Quercus texana – Nuttall’s Oak – south central North America
  • Quercus velutina – Black Oak or Eastern Black Oak or Dyer’s Oak – eastern North America
  • Quercus wislizenii – Interior Live Oak # – California
  • Quercus xalapensis – Mexico

The white oaks (synonym sect. Lepidobalanus). Europe, Asia, north Africa, North America. Styles short; acorns mature in 6 months, sweet or slightly bitter, inside of acorn shell hairless.

  • Quercus alba – White Oak – eastern North America
  • Quercus aliena – Oriental White Oak – eastern Asia
  • Quercus arizonica – Arizona White Oak # – southwestern U.S., nw. Mexico
  • Quercus austrina – Bluff Oak – southeastern North America
  • Quercus berberidifolia – California Scrub Oak – California
  • Quercus bicolor – Swamp White Oak – eastern & midwestern North America
  • Quercus boyntonii – Boynton’s Post Oak – south central North America
  • Quercus cerrioides – Cerrioide Oak – Catalonia, Aragon, Majorca, La Rioja and Navarra, possibly extending into France
  • Quercus chapmannii – Chapmann Oak – southeastern North America
  • Quercus cornelius-mulleri – Muller Oak – southwestern North America
  • Quercus copeyensis – Costa Rica, Panama
  • Quercus depressipes – Davis Mountain Oak – Texas
  • Quercus dilatata – Moru Oak – Himalaya
  • Quercus douglasii – Blue Oak – California
  • Quercus dumosa – Coastal Scrub Oak – southern California
  • Quercus durata – Leather Oak – California
  • Quercus engelmannii – Engelmann Oak # – southwestern California
  • Quercus faginea – Portuguese oak – southwestern Europe
  • Quercus fusiformis – Texas Live Oak or Plateau Live Oak – south central North America
  • Quercus gambelii – Gambel Oak – southwestern North America
  • Quercus garryana – Oregon White Oak or Garry Oak – western North America
  • Quercus geminata – Sand Live Oak # – southeastern North America
  • Quercus grisea – Gray Oak – south central North America
  • Quercus havardii – Havard Oak, Shin Oak – south central North America
  • Quercus hinckleyi – Hinckley Oak – Texas
  • Quercus hondurensis – Honduras Oak # – Honduras
  • Quercus ilex – Holly Oak or Holm Oak # – southern Europe, northwestern Africa
  • Quercus intricata – Intricate Oak – Texas
  • Quercus john-tuckeri – Tucker’s Oak – southwestern North America
  • Quercus laceyi – Lacey Oak – south central North America (Texas)
  • Quercus lanata – Woolly-leaved Oak # – Himalaya
  • Quercus leucotrichophora – Banj Oak # – Himalaya
  • Quercus lobata – Valley Oak or California White Oak – California
  • Quercus lyrata – Overcup Oak – eastern North America
  • Quercus macrocarpa – Bur Oak – eastern and central North America
  • Quercus mohriana – Mohr Oak – southwestern North America
  • Quercus michauxii – Swamp Chestnut Oak – eastern North America
  • Quercus minima – Dwarf Live Oak # – southeastern North America
  • Quercus mongolica – Mongolian Oak – eastern Asia
  • Quercus montana – Chestnut Oak – eastern North America (syn. Q. prinus)
  • Quercus muhlenbergii – Chinkapin Oak – eastern, central, and southwestern US (West Texas and New Mexico), northern Mexico
  • Quercus oblongifolia – Mexican Blue Oak # – southwestern U.S., nw. Mexico
  • Quercus oglethorpensis – Oglethorpe Oak – southeastern North America
  • Quercus peduncularis – # – Central America
  • Quercus petraea – Sessile Oak – Europe
  • Quercus polymorpha – Monterrey Oak # – Mexico and extreme S. Texas
  • Quercus prinoides – Dwarf Chinkapin Oak – eastern North America
  • Quercus pubescens – Downy Oak – Europe
  • Quercus pungens – Sandpaper Oak # – south central North America
  • Quercus robur – Pedunculate Oak or English Oak – Europe, West Asia
  • Quercus rugosa – Netleaf Oak # – southwestern U.S., nw. Mexico
  • Quercus sadleriana – Sadler Oak, Deer Oak – sw. Oregon, northern California
  • Quercus stellata – Post Oak – eastern North America
  • Quercus toumeyi – Toumey Oak – southwest New Mexico
  • Quercus turbinella – Desert Scrub Oak or Scrub Live Oak # – southwestern North America
  • Quercus vaseyana – Vasey Oak – southwestern North America
  • Quercus virginiana – Southern Live Oak # – southeastern North America

-- http://nelsonwoodworks.biz/

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Justin

36 posts in 2412 days


#10 posted 03-08-2008 12:29 AM

Thanks for the info guys. I think I am going to get a little bit of it and see how I like it.

Justin

View teenagewoodworker's profile

teenagewoodworker

2727 posts in 2423 days


#11 posted 03-08-2008 01:38 AM

make sure you post some pictures of the wood and what you do with it later on.

View patrick m's profile

patrick m

197 posts in 2468 days


#12 posted 03-08-2008 01:50 AM

Holy oak trees ! that’s a lot of oaks . I had no idea. Thanks Daren ! Yes , watch for checking… Find out how long it was dried and how etc… I don’t know every one’s advice sounds, sound. I just got some horribly twisted wet walnut off the internet. Oh well…. sure I’ll use it. MUST LEARN MORE ABOUT kiln dried lumber and learn about moister readers etc… Think I’d better get a book … I’ve been seeing the super wide range of quality from buying lumber on-line.. Found two good sellers…for walnut and elm. Think I should have looked here first!!! Think for my next project I’ll ask a few of you guys , I think tom has a really cool link , And I gotta try some of his stuff… hmm , let me go ask. Let me know how you like the black oak , I’m so happy with the cheaper Elm I found , That I’m very interested in more un-common american lumber.

-- PJM.`·.¸¸.·´¯`·.¸¸.·´¯`·.¸ ><((((º> ""BY HAMMER AND HAND ALL ARTS DO STAND""1785-1974 nyc Semper Fi, Patrick M

View Suz's profile

Suz

51 posts in 2411 days


#13 posted 03-08-2008 01:55 PM

Around here we cut black oak up for firewood.

-- Jim

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