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Forum topic by BoilerUp21 posted 12-06-2017 01:21 PM 392 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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BoilerUp21

15 posts in 603 days


12-06-2017 01:21 PM

I have read through a couple other posts regarding purchase of a mortising machine, but thought I would see if anyone else had any other recommendations before I take the plunge…

I am considering buying the Baileigh MC-625 and I have seen any reviews or comments on here about it. For $295, it comes with the standard features, but also has an X/Y table. For these features, and the visible build quality, the price seems right.

I do not want to spend more than $350 on a dedicated mortising machine, but also want to purchase something that I wont regret and have to replace down the road.

Any comments on this specific machine or alternative with similar features would be greatly appreciated as I would like to purchase within the next week.

Thanks!


13 replies so far

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2714 posts in 1317 days


#1 posted 12-06-2017 02:10 PM

I can’t comment on that specific machine although being Baleigh one would assume the quality is there.

The XY table is a huge + IMO. When I was looking at benchtop mortisers the only issue I had was the 1/2HP motor it seems underpowered to me. PM has 3/4 on theirs which might be worth the extra $100 although it doesn’t have the XY table.

I was going to buy the Rikon XY mortiser and would have except I was very fortunate to come across a used PM floor model I was able to pick up for $450. [sorry for the gloat but its the only deal I’ve ever made I’m usually a day late :-D].

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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BoilerUp21

15 posts in 603 days


#2 posted 12-06-2017 02:32 PM

I came across a used PM floor model as well on craigslist in great condition for $350. Needless to say, it was spoken for within 30 minutes of getting posted and I was an hour late…glad you are able to gloat. It still kills me that I missed a great deal on a great machine by an hour!

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Rob

307 posts in 2823 days


#3 posted 12-06-2017 03:31 PM

I have the Grizzly Benchtop Mortiser shown here https://www.grizzly.com/products/1-2-HP-Bench-Top-Mortising-Machine/G0645

I rarely use it because my woodworking took me in a different direction. I would sell it to you cheap but the shipping cost would be prohibitive I’m sure. They aren’t light!

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RobS888

2316 posts in 1681 days


#4 posted 12-06-2017 04:23 PM

I have the MC-625. It makes cutting mortises a breeze.

I paid a lot more than $295. if I was looking again, I would consider the Rikon version. It has a wheel for moving the table side to side whereas mine has a rod that fits in a hub with 3 holes, a wheel wouldn’t take much attention from what you are doing. It also has an adjustable handle and tool holder…

I just checked and they aren’t the same price anymore. The Rikon is more.

-- I always suspected many gun nuts were afraid of something, just never thought popcorn was on the list.

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BoilerUp21

15 posts in 603 days


#5 posted 12-06-2017 04:42 PM

I agree, I would prefer it had the wheel, but for the features at $295, I can overlook this. The Rikon goes for $380, but comes with 4 chisels instead of 1. It also has a 5” stroke compared to the 4” of the MC-625.

So after shipping, and considering the chisels…maybe I should go the Rikon route…

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RobS888

2316 posts in 1681 days


#6 posted 12-06-2017 05:19 PM



I agree, I would prefer it had the wheel, but for the features at $295, I can overlook this. The Rikon goes for $380, but comes with 4 chisels instead of 1. It also has a 5” stroke compared to the 4” of the MC-625.

So after shipping, and considering the chisels…maybe I should go the Rikon route…

- BoilerUp21


Thing I really like is setting the up down limits, so the bit stops just above the workpiece, so it is slide plunge, slide plunge.

I set up the bit to eject to the right and keep a 2 1/2 inch DC hose there, so the chips are pulled out, but it keeps the bit cool and I don’t have to stop except to re-position the workpiece.

-- I always suspected many gun nuts were afraid of something, just never thought popcorn was on the list.

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BoilerUp21

15 posts in 603 days


#7 posted 12-06-2017 05:52 PM


I agree, I would prefer it had the wheel, but for the features at $295, I can overlook this. The Rikon goes for $380, but comes with 4 chisels instead of 1. It also has a 5” stroke compared to the 4” of the MC-625.

So after shipping, and considering the chisels…maybe I should go the Rikon route…

- BoilerUp21

Thing I really like is setting the up down limits, so the bit stops just above the workpiece, so it is slide plunge, slide plunge.

I set up the bit to eject to the right and keep a 2 1/2 inch DC hose there, so the chips are pulled out, but it keeps the bit cool and I don t have to stop except to re-position the workpiece.

- RobS888

I assume both have the up down limit feature? Thanks for your input!

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

5464 posts in 2649 days


#8 posted 12-06-2017 06:16 PM

Two weaknesses I see right away…
1. The table is too small. You will fight keeping long workpieces in place.

2. The clamp vice is not quick-release, and requires you to re-mount it with bolts occasionally.

These are the reasons I steered clear of the Rikon as well. This has been sold as a York Craft, Rikon, Baleigh etc. Check Fine Woodworking magazine for an old review of the York Craft. They said it was the only mortiser in the test that wouldn’t make acceptable mortises. Neverthless, I think a good craftsman can make an average tool do great work.

I went with a Jet floor mortiser, and have been quite pleased. It shares castings with the Powermatic, it just doesn’t have the tilting head feature. The power of the motor combined with the long handle really make it easy to use. I still have my old Delta benchtop unit that hasn’t been used a single time since I got a floor model. I suppose it depends on how often you plan to use it.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

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Andre

1493 posts in 1642 days


#9 posted 12-06-2017 06:38 PM

I keep looking at these machine every time I do some mortises, then pull out the chisels and forget about it!
I have a set up for the drill press but by the time I set it up You can pound out a dozen holes?
Maybe if I come across a good deal? Lots of good points brought up I never thought about.

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

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SweetTea

243 posts in 496 days


#10 posted 12-07-2017 01:34 AM

I would look for one of the old vintage Oliver’s. Been searching for one myself, actually.

View RobS888's profile

RobS888

2316 posts in 1681 days


#11 posted 12-07-2017 04:46 AM


Two weaknesses I see right away…
1. The table is too small. You will fight keeping long workpieces in place.

2. The clamp vice is not quick-release, and requires you to re-mount it with bolts occasionally.

These are the reasons I steered clear of the Rikon as well. This has been sold as a York Craft, Rikon, Baleigh etc. Check Fine Woodworking magazine for an old review of the York Craft. They said it was the only mortiser in the test that wouldn t make acceptable mortises. Neverthless, I think a good craftsman can make an average tool do great work.

I went with a Jet floor mortiser, and have been quite pleased. It shares castings with the Powermatic, it just doesn t have the tilting head feature. The power of the motor combined with the long handle really make it easy to use. I still have my old Delta benchtop unit that hasn t been used a single time since I got a floor model. I suppose it depends on how often you plan to use it.

- pintodeluxe


If I had the room, money, or need I would have gone with a floor standing mortises, but I lacked all three :-).

I haven’t made anything longer than 2 feet, but, I suspect, I can support the end easily

The table moves 7 inches, so you can do quite a bit without removing the workpiece. I have several blanks, (I guess I would call them) that I use to shim the vice, so I don’t have to move the vice front.

-- I always suspected many gun nuts were afraid of something, just never thought popcorn was on the list.

View AlGar's profile

AlGar

9 posts in 266 days


#12 posted 12-07-2017 01:23 PM

I bought the Shop Fox G9976 about 10 years ago. I looked and compared for a long time. For the money, features, and capacity, I couldn’t beat it. It is one of a few tools I bought new, and the store threw in a set of four chisels with the purchase.

I enhanced the table by putting an auxiliary piece of wood on top of it with T-slots along it. Then I found some in-line skate wheels, and mounted those to the table with T-bolts. This allows the piece being mortised to be held against the fence, yet slide along the fence.

A couple of friends also bought this at my suggestion, after seeing and trying mine. I have no complaints whatsoever.

-- Ohio Alan

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pontic

501 posts in 445 days


#13 posted 12-07-2017 02:54 PM

I have a grizzly used it for years. First thing I did was to upgrade the chuck to a 1/2” capacity. I recommend you check this before you buy one. The 1/2” mortise cutters and larger require the 1/2” chuck. Especially the hi end ones. Most of the benchtop mortises use a 3/8” chuck. this limits the size of mortise cutters you can use. I see the Baileigh uses a 1/2” chuck so it think it will suit your needs.

-- Illigitimii non carburundum sum

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