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Forum topic by TJU posted 03-02-2011 03:32 PM 1258 views 0 times favorited 30 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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TJU

72 posts in 1322 days


03-02-2011 03:32 PM

I am currently looking for a better way to hone my blades and chisels. I have a good setup with a pair of duoSharp stones for establishing a primary bevel and then I use 2000p sand paper and some green honing compound on a flat maple block and/or a leather strop to put on a micro bevel. I like free hand honing in between sharpening, especially with my chisels. If I’m going to take the time to sharpen my blades I want to get them as sharp as possible. Should I go with an 8000 grit water stone? That is what I am leaning towards. What do you guys find fast, easy, and effective?
Thanks,
Tim

-- Although the voices aren't real they have some pretty good ideas.


30 replies so far

View pete79's profile

pete79

154 posts in 1806 days


#1 posted 03-02-2011 04:36 PM

Well I just took my first ever shot at honing my chisels and plane blades two days ago, so I by no means am an expert. However, I went to the local woodcraft and they recommended finishing with an 8000 waterstone as an easy method for me (remember – i had not tried this before). I got VERY good results. The only problem I have is keeping the bevel angle steady while I sharpen – but that’s a whole other discussion.

-- Life is a one lap race.

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helluvawreck

15893 posts in 1532 days


#2 posted 03-02-2011 05:08 PM

After all of the studying up on woodcarving over the last few months I’ve about decided that I’m going to switch to a good set of diamond stones. Is that a good idea? I don’t know but I’m going to do it. I have a good set of Arkansas stones and a nice set of ceramic stones and I like them ok but they say diamond stones are more aggressive, save a lot of time, and will last a very long time with very little maintenance. I didn’t like water stones because they wear too fast and I don’t like the mess. The last time I had to flatten my water stones I just put em in the drawer and never went back to them.

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

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TJU

72 posts in 1322 days


#3 posted 03-02-2011 05:40 PM

diamond stones are great but they are too agressive to hone your edge. Even the dia-sharp extra extra fine will not pollish an edge like you will want.

-- Although the voices aren't real they have some pretty good ideas.

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Bertha

12951 posts in 1359 days


#4 posted 03-02-2011 06:14 PM

I use a quick pass over a 10,000 grit stone on my secondary when I’m not too lazy to pull out the jig. I’m too finicky to risk freehanding but I certainly admire it. I’ll also let it pass a few revolutions freehand on the Tormek strop if I’m feeling lazy. I’ll take a few swipes on a board-mounted leather strop if I’m feeling super lazy. I’ve never had issues using the Eclipse jig on a 10,000 grit stone but the stone itself is rather expensive (although not as bad as a DMT). Eclipse jig on 2000 grit on a marble slab is usually good enough for chisels. I’m picky about plane blades, so that usually doesn’t suffice.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

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rwyoung

369 posts in 2138 days


#5 posted 03-02-2011 06:29 PM

Moving from green chrome-oxide compound back to an 8000 grit stone is going backwards.

With a microbevel, you have so little material to remove, the honing post 2000 grit paper should be sufficient. Have you looked at the edge you are creating with a magnifying glass? Can you see strong scratch marks in the microbevel post honing? If you can’t you are done.

-- Don't sweat the petty things and don't pet the sweaty things.

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naturalwonders

3 posts in 1308 days


#6 posted 03-02-2011 06:52 PM

10000 grit Naniwa Super Stone will get a nice mirror polish. I will use the leather strop occasionaly before going back to the stones for cleaning up the edge. You can keep a sharp edge longer with leather.

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

15893 posts in 1532 days


#7 posted 03-02-2011 07:50 PM

TJ, you may be right because I’m certainly not an authority but there are a few professional woodcarvers out there that have been carving for around 40 years that use nothing but diamond stones and leather strops. I’m going to have to see for myself and then I will know for sure. Of course I have always been a stubborn cuss – I will admit that. ;-)

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

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dbray45

2514 posts in 1442 days


#8 posted 03-02-2011 08:23 PM

I just bought the DMT stones and plan to keep my 8000 grit water stone. The diamod stones are great but the water stone finishes to a mirror finish.

-- David in Damascus, MD

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helluvawreck

15893 posts in 1532 days


#9 posted 03-02-2011 08:41 PM

I’m pretty sure that these guys are going to 8000 grit with the diamond stones. I believe that the 8000 grit is bonded to a highly accurate steel plate. I could be wrong – they may be changing stone type – but I’m pretty sure that’s the way I remember it – 8000 grit diamond plates. Just diamond stones and strops.

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

View TJU's profile

TJU

72 posts in 1322 days


#10 posted 03-02-2011 08:55 PM

I have the dia-sharp extra extra fine 8000 grit plate and I like it. The problem is that it will only pollish an edge like 1000 grit sand paper. If you go right from the diamond to the green honing compound you will be honing for longer than I would like.

-- Although the voices aren't real they have some pretty good ideas.

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

15893 posts in 1532 days


#11 posted 03-02-2011 09:07 PM

Well TJ, you may be just the guy I’m looking for. I may be stubborn but not stubborn enough not to listen to somebody that seems to know what he’s talking about. I was fixing to buy my diamond stones this week because I like the idea of their aggressive nature and durability. Why don’t you give me a quick run down of how you go about sharpening your carving tools. I’m certainly open minded about these things and money don’t grow on trees.

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

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TJU

72 posts in 1322 days


#12 posted 03-02-2011 09:35 PM

I have only had my diamond stones for a few months but I really like them and will continue to use them. They are fast, easy to use, and simple to take care of. I mainly sharpen chisels, hand plane irons, and card scrapers. The only problem I have is I think that there is too big of a gap between the finest diamond stone and the honing compound. Maybe as my 8000 grit diamond stone gets used more it will become better at polishing an edge. With carving tools it may be different because some of the smaller blades may hone faster on a strop and you might be able to go right from the 8000 grit diamond to the strop. I’m just interested in finding something to use in between the two.
Here are two links that I have looked at.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7T1p3vfV-vI&playnext=1&list=PLC5C93B039C68AB6A

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QAwBU6QANag

-- Although the voices aren't real they have some pretty good ideas.

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1359 days


#13 posted 03-02-2011 09:50 PM

I’m no expert on diamond stones but I’ve used Scary sharp, wet stones, & powered/unpowered strops for a number of years. It’s true that my friend’s diamond stones/plates seem to cut more coarsely than their rating would imply. However, they are dead flat, very aggressive, & clean easily. I don’t know this for sure, but with a diamond stone, it doesn’t seem like there’d be any risk of contamination if you went straight over to a 10,000 grit water stone from the 8,000 diamond plate. However, this seems like a pretty large gap in grit. However, if we’re talking even a 6000’ish grit primary bevel off the diamond stone & a 10,000 grit secondary off the water stone, I imagine that to be pretty workable, given the very small bevel. A few passes on a strop after my 10,000 grit waterstone & I’m rolling. I’ve used the green oxide stone on the wheel afterwards with good results, although I’m not entirely certain what the grit-equivalent is. Perhaps I’m going backwards as well? This is a great topic.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

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TJU

72 posts in 1322 days


#14 posted 03-02-2011 09:53 PM

I think that the DMT link is a little deceptive becasue it looks more like a mirror finish than it actually is after using the 8000 grit stone. 2000 grit sand paper will pollish and edge slightly better than my 8000 grit stone.

-- Although the voices aren't real they have some pretty good ideas.

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1359 days


#15 posted 03-02-2011 09:57 PM

Totally agree with TJU above^. 2000 grit sandpaper is my pre-strop treatment of choice. I’ve got all the stones & Tormek but I use 800-2000 grit sandpaper 95% of the time (with a $10 Eclipse jig, although I’ve got the Veritas). The only time I really fuss with anything else is to establish a new primary, flatten a hollow-grind, or install a camber. I’m a huge believer in sandpaper & you sure can buy a lot of it for the price of a high-grit DMT. I especially prefer paper for flattening iron backs, as I’ve gouged expensive stones before.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

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