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Help with new woodshop layout

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Forum topic by ATLJack posted 12-05-2017 03:15 AM 584 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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ATLJack

30 posts in 2405 days


12-05-2017 03:15 AM

I am moving and will have a dedicated space in my basement for a woodshop (yeah!). I am trying to figure out how to lay it out so that I know where to place outlets and which outlets need to be on dedicated circuits. I dont have much experience in this. I drew this layout in cad and would love to get your input.

I am fortunate that the space is mostly unfinished so I will have an opportunity to wire it the way I want. The west, north, and east walls are concrete – I will furr them out with sheetrock. The south wall is in place. It might be a long shot, but I might be able to talk my wife into letting me claim a little more space by moving the south wall to make the shop a square. In doing so I will steal space from the future game room, but it would give me a lot more options for the shop. For the time being, however, I want to assume that I cannot move that wall.

I thought I was going to have a ton of space, currently I am crammed into about 3/5’s of a 2 car garage. But as I lay it out I realize I have less space than I thought. Clearly, a lot of the machinery will need to be on mobile bases.

The everyday use of the shop is for me to produce items for my wifes home business. To fulfill her needs I primarily use the table saw, miter saw, and drum sander. For my own projects I will primarily use the router table, planer, jointer, band saw, and table saw. I dont own a lathe and I’ve never used one, but would like to add one.

As far as wiring goes, I think I will have a dedicated circuit for the dust collector. The table saw and jointer can share a circuit. The east wall can share a circuit and the north wall can share a circuit. Lighting will be on its own circuit.

I would love any insight or comments you have on layout, wiring, or anything else you think I should consider.


7 replies so far

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ATLJack

30 posts in 2405 days


#1 posted 12-05-2017 03:23 AM

In case the layout is to small to see here it is a little bigger:

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4576/24970457628_a5190bee2e_h.jpg

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MT_Stringer

3173 posts in 3351 days


#2 posted 12-05-2017 03:29 AM

Something for you to think about. What is the longest board you can rip on the table saw as you now have it located?

I work out of a one car garage with a lot of tools in it. I positioned my table saw just inside the overhead door and facing the rest of the garage (outfeed table/work bench). I can rip boards as long as 45 inches. Anything longer and I have to raise the garage door which is no real problem.

The outfeed table is also my only work area. I have built a lot of cabinets (60+) on that table (and the one before it).

Good luck with your new shop area.

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

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ATLJack

30 posts in 2405 days


#3 posted 12-05-2017 03:37 AM

Whats funny is that I can tell your shop is very similar to my current setup. I even have my jointer lined up next to the table saw like yours.

Unless I measured wrong, I should be able to rip an 8’ sheet of plywood with the layout I posted above. I cant imagine needing to rip anything longer than that. I guess I should put the table saw and outfeed on wheels in case I want to make a table longer than 8’.

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MT_Stringer

3173 posts in 3351 days


#4 posted 12-05-2017 03:47 AM



Whats funny is that I can tell your shop is very similar to my current setup. I even have my jointer lined up next to the table saw like yours.

Unless I measured wrong, I should be able to rip an 8 sheet of plywood with the layout I posted above. I cant imagine needing to rip anything longer than that. I guess I should put the table saw and outfeed on wheels in case I want to make a table longer than 8 .

- ATLJack

Thanks.
Everything on casters, or mobile bases. Move ‘em around as needed. It is a necessity for me.

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

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LittleShaver

367 posts in 740 days


#5 posted 12-05-2017 07:08 PM

Mobile bases are a must. No plan will ever fit all needs unless you plan to be flexible. Most of my rip cuts are < 4 ft, but not too long ago I was faced with ripping 16 foot boards. Even with a 30’ shop, I was glad I could open the garage doors to rip those boards. Took less than 5 minutes to shift things around to make the cuts. Mobile bases saved the day and my back.

-- Sawdust Maker

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rbrjr1

170 posts in 326 days


#6 posted 12-05-2017 09:37 PM

Here’s what I would do:

move your lumber rack (i assume it’s horizontal racking) and set it up over the top of your miter saw station. (or move the miter saw up under the lumber rack)

move your table saw down to where the lumber rack is and set up your outfeed/workbench/assembly station right behind it.. (picture walking through the 4’ door and right up to the saw)

mount your band saw and drill press on a single mobile station at a right angle to each other (if you have a grinder, this is a good place for it)

treat your large shop like it was a small shop and figure the rest out as you go along..

-how will you set up dust collection?
-build the walls with sound absorptive construction methods
-anything you can store up high, store up high.. (close in ceiling framing in sections and it’ll act as sound deadening)

the shop lies before you like a new fallen tract of snow.. be careful where you tread because every track will show..

-- only an idiot dismisses an intelligent statement because they dont know anything about the person delivering it.

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LesB

1801 posts in 3563 days


#7 posted 12-05-2017 09:44 PM

My one comment is about wiring. Set it up with adequate 220v outlets, even if you don’t need them right now.
I built a new shop 20 years ago and only put in one 220v outlet in the (concrete) floor next to the table saw. Over the years I upgraded tools and now have a 220v lathe, 220v band saw and 220v plainer and I’m looking at a 220v dust collector. Fortunately my electrical panel has plenty of openings but my only way to route the wires to the tools was with surface mounted cable. UGLY dust collectors.

-- Les B, Oregon

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