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Forum topic by Carloz posted 12-03-2017 07:06 PM 223 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Carloz

981 posts in 430 days


12-03-2017 07:06 PM

I am considering options for a kitchen island top. It does have a sink.
Granite looks nice but not very practical especially some varieties (most of them) that are prone to water damage, cracks etc. Corian is bullet proof but does not look that nice.
So I stopped on making it from long grain 8/4 walnut finished with waterlox. I could not find reliable information how good this idea is especially around the sink. Does someone have experience with it? Hiw many years does such solution last?


8 replies so far

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

4807 posts in 3799 days


#1 posted 12-03-2017 07:54 PM

Don’t know what you have been reading about granite, but I have had no issues with them/it.
I would not try the wood tops due to the need for on-going upkeep.
Try the thought for the man made stone such as Silgranite.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

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corelz125

314 posts in 815 days


#2 posted 12-03-2017 07:58 PM

I have never heard of solid granite counter tops cracking or getting damaged by water. Marble counter tops are are prone to damage

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Rich

1984 posts in 428 days


#3 posted 12-03-2017 08:17 PM

I finished my wenge counter top for the guest bath vanity with Waterlox. It’s very durable and water just beads up on it. The hardness of the wood matters of course. No finish is going to prevent a dent if something drops on it.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

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Carloz

981 posts in 430 days


#4 posted 12-03-2017 08:18 PM

I did not read. This is my personal experience. We use the sink a lot and granit around the sink gets soaked with water unless you wipe it out after each use. Sealing it regularly helps but it is a pain. Maybe the granit we had was not good.
Cracked granite is more a norm than exception. Especially at narrower places, like between the sink cutout and the edge. Sometimes the substrate is not ideally flat or gives in with time and the granit cracks over the cavity under some stress for example when hammering pork chops. We saw a lot of those when shoppping for a house.
But regardless. This is a woodworking forum so if you have experience with wood countertops please chime in.

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ArtMann

688 posts in 655 days


#5 posted 12-04-2017 04:39 AM

Nearly all the people in my circle of friends have granite counter tops. Some of them are over 10 years old. They haven’t experienced any cracking or water damage. They look new. I am in the process of building a new house and it will have granite. Before we decided to build, we must have looked a a hundred new houses in some very upscale neighborhoods. Every single house we saw had either granite or the more expensive man made quartz surfaces. I don’t think your assessment of these materials is shared by many other people.

I have seen a few houses that featured wooden counter tops (maple). They either looked great or terrible depending on whether the occupants did any cooking.

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jbay

1857 posts in 738 days


#6 posted 12-04-2017 05:05 AM



Nearly all the people in my circle of friends have granite counter tops. Some of them are over 10 years old.

- ArtMann

You should hang out with older people.

-- If anyone would like to see my Portfolio, PM me and I would be glad to send you the link.

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Rich

1984 posts in 428 days


#7 posted 12-04-2017 05:07 AM

Nearly all the people in my circle of friends have granite counter tops. Some of them are over 10 years old.

- ArtMann

You should hang out with older people.

- jbay

LOL.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

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JBrow

1274 posts in 759 days


#8 posted 12-05-2017 01:32 AM

Carloz,

I made a pine (white pine I believe) vanity top for the master bath and installed it in about 2004. A surface mounted cast iron sink sets in the center. The vanity top was finished with 3 to 5 coats of polyurethane (cannot recall how many coats, but were I to do it today, I would go with 5 coats). All surfaces including the edges of the sink cut-out were finished. I am not certain whether I used a waterproof glue (like Titebond III) when gluing up the planks. Whatever glue I used has held up well, but I would recommend Titebond III for any glue-ups.

I have seen no issues with the 13 year old vanity top, although I did have to re-caulk around the sink rim a couple of years ago. The glue seams where planks were edge glued to form the top remain tight. There is no twisting of the top. I have seen no signs of mold, even after a couple of under the sink plumbing leaks. Based on my experience, I see no reason why a wooden kitchen countertop would not workout.

Walnut is a fairly soft wood and therefore accepts dents and dings fairly quickly. It may be worth considering a denser wood like sugar maple or an exotic hardwood for the kitchen. If you go with a food-friendly oil finish, I would think maintenance would become a regular chore to keep the countertop looking good. Polyurethane would require no maintenance, but it is probably a good idea to use a cutting board when chopping stuff. But I suspect with a wooden countertop, you probably already have that in mind.

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