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Cutting board planing advice

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Forum topic by mwarning posted 12-03-2017 11:38 AM 334 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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mwarning

16 posts in 221 days


12-03-2017 11:38 AM

Howdy folks. My wife thought it’d be nice to build some last minute cutting boards from some scrap to give as gifts. I don’t have much time and so I’ll probably just do up some simple edge grain boards. Given my material, I’d prefer to orient the board with the grain running along the short side as seen on the right in the photo below. My planer won’t be able to accommodate it going through in that direction however, so I’d have to rotate it and put it through against the grain. Should I avoid this? I know many people suggest to not send end grain boards through, but I’m wondering about this. I suppose the finish wouldn’t be all that good. Thoughts?


9 replies so far

View Rich's profile

Rich

1981 posts in 426 days


#1 posted 12-03-2017 11:53 AM

I think it’s going to be a problem if your planer has regular knives. It could even damage your planer.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

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Slider20

119 posts in 358 days


#2 posted 12-03-2017 01:08 PM

I’ve done that in two cutting boards with a straight knife cutter on my Dewalt DW736, I chamfered the trailing edge and took super light passes, worked fine, it’s certainly not ideal, but flattening by hand was sulo much trouble for me that I decided to risk it.

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

4478 posts in 2188 days


#3 posted 12-03-2017 01:12 PM

Why don’t you make the the boards longer then cut them to final length after you plane them?

-- Bondo Gaposis

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Tennessee

2588 posts in 2351 days


#4 posted 12-03-2017 01:51 PM

I ran into a guy at a festival with end grain boards – he said he had flattened them with a standard lunch box planer. That was OK and kind of amazed me, until I looked closer and saw a LOT of very small fill points, where he had tearout and had to fill it with putty. I would never send out a board that had putty on the usable face. High strength epoxy, maybe if the hole was small and not in the usual knife cutting area.
I think it depends on the wood you are using. His tearout was only on certain woods. (Sorry I don’t remember which species, but everything in the board was domestic.)

-- Tsunami Guitars and Custom Woodworking, Cleveland, TN

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tomsteve

667 posts in 1056 days


#5 posted 12-03-2017 09:32 PM

this reads like a “hold my beer and start the video” type of thing.

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

3652 posts in 2146 days


#6 posted 12-03-2017 10:46 PM


Why don t you make the the boards longer then cut them to final length after you plane them?

- bondogaposis

I agree 100%. But he said “Given my material, I’d prefer to orient the board with the grain running along the short side as seen on the right in the photo below.”

I’m thinking his stock is to short to make longer one to cut up.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View Shamb3's profile

Shamb3

11 posts in 18 days


#7 posted 12-03-2017 11:04 PM

could you build it in 2 halves, plane both halves to the same thickness and glue them together on a really flat surface? I have no experience with this, so that might be a dumb thought :)

View Rich's profile

Rich

1981 posts in 426 days


#8 posted 12-03-2017 11:19 PM


could you build it in 2 halves, plane both halves to the same thickness and glue them together on a really flat surface? I have no experience with this, so that might be a dumb thought :)

- Shamb3

+1. That’s the way to go for sure. Little sanding and he’s all set. While he’s at it, he should work on convincing his wife that he needs a drum sander.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

View franktha4th's profile

franktha4th

34 posts in 11 days


#9 posted 12-04-2017 01:16 AM

I have jointed against the grain and it did fine with really shallow passes, but never tried it through a planer. Im with Rich, a drum sander works great for this!

-- Frank, Washington State, https://www.youtube.com/user/franktha4th

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