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question about purchasing "new to me" rough lumber and acclimation

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Forum topic by Holbs posted 12-02-2017 01:52 AM 346 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Holbs

1721 posts in 1865 days


12-02-2017 01:52 AM

One thing that has confused me about when you purchase rough sawn lumber at your local hardwood dealer. I’ve always read “purchase and then let it sit for a bit”. Maybe other hardwood dealers are different than mine but my local dealer has open roll up doors in the warehouse that “should” be same temp / humidity (warehouse doors are open unless chilly out) as the outside which in turn should be the same conditions in my 2 car garage. Luckily here in northern Nevada, humidity is usually in the teens 340 days of the year since 5,000 feet in the Sierra Mountains.
I just bought 2 boards of 8/4 Hard Maple 10’x9” for my upcoming project of a joinery bench. Was thinking of letting it sit for 2-3 days and then start cutting rough dimensions, and then letting the pieces sit again a couple more days before final dimensions. Good? Bad?
I do not know “moisture” content as I do not have a moister meter (hmm..maybe I should get one).

-- The Carpenter Bee is derived from the Ancient Greek word wood-cutter


7 replies so far

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Ripper70

608 posts in 744 days


#1 posted 12-02-2017 01:58 AM

General Tools MMD4E Moisture Meter.

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo

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Holbs

1721 posts in 1865 days


#2 posted 12-02-2017 02:04 AM

wow…$15-30 for cheap meters. might have to get one even if only lasts a season :)

-- The Carpenter Bee is derived from the Ancient Greek word wood-cutter

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Ripper70

608 posts in 744 days


#3 posted 12-02-2017 03:36 AM

Well, considering what you probably paid for the wood and the effort you’ll put into your project, seems a small price to pay for a moisture meter.

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo

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AZWoody

1138 posts in 1059 days


#4 posted 12-02-2017 07:16 PM

I use that same meter plus also use the pinless version. It’s not the most accurate but can give you a relative idea on how things are drying as time progresses. They’re definitely worth having.

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HTown

77 posts in 1022 days


#5 posted 12-03-2017 05:02 AM

I have wondered the same thing about how important it is to let boards acclimate when neither the yard nor my shop have HVAC.
I tend to rough cut the boards and partially mill them. Then they set until the next weekend when I mill to final dimensions. Maple boards are the ones that seem to change shape the most for me so I try not to shortchange the acclimation time for that species.
FWIW, I haven’t had much need for a moisture meter.

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a1Jim

116566 posts in 3413 days


#6 posted 12-03-2017 05:11 AM

I think you have a good plan ,that should give your material time to acclimate.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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splintergroup

1696 posts in 1058 days


#7 posted 12-03-2017 02:48 PM

All the rough sawn boards I buy have been through the same kiln drying as the S2S lumber. Bonus is I can save a few bucks and often the 4/4 wood is actually 1-1/4” so I get more thickness if the surface is reasonable.

You should not notice any differences as far as stock preparation steps. Cut to length, clean the surfaces, but leave over dimensioned, let sit for a few days, then cut to width and wait a few days.

Some woods like to move a lot after being cut, others behave.

It is always good to know the MC of your wood if you are unfamiliar with the source so a meter can be handy to have.

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