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Please Help a Blithering Idiot Find the Correct Arbor Nut

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Forum topic by David Schwarz posted 12-01-2017 06:12 AM 2040 views 0 times favorited 21 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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David Schwarz

69 posts in 57 days


12-01-2017 06:12 AM

This is my “new” Unisaw:

This is the arbor inside the saw:

I purchased an arbor nut for a right tilt saw. When I tried to thread it onto the arbor this evening, it was no go; the thread is clearly the opposite pitch to what I need.

So my questions:

1. Do I indeed have a right tilt saw?

2. Does that saw have the proper arbor in it for a right tilt saw (assuming it is in fact such)?

3. Am I an idiot? Maybe the provider sent me the wrong arbor nut?

I’m so close, and this wasn’t an area that I thought would be an obstacle. But perhaps the answer to number three will be the most illuminating :-(

-- I make trees cry.


21 replies so far

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

6017 posts in 2039 days


#1 posted 12-01-2017 06:37 AM

Yeah, that’s a right tilt arbor… reverse threads (clockwise to loosen). If the nut they sent you has the wrong thread direction, then it’s for a left tilt saw. Here is a photo of the arbor parts for a right tilt machine for comparison:

Or from another angle:

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View David Schwarz's profile

David Schwarz

69 posts in 57 days


#2 posted 12-01-2017 06:49 AM

I’m both relieved and stymied (is that possible?). Guess I’ll need to have a word with the supplier to find out what happened.

-- I make trees cry.

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

4497 posts in 3083 days


#3 posted 12-01-2017 06:07 PM

Right tilt saw; left hand thread. It is either a 5/8-6 or a 5/8-8 thread, Count the number of threads per inch on the arbor https://www.mcmaster.com/#91808a027/=1ahwoi0

View David Schwarz's profile

David Schwarz

69 posts in 57 days


#4 posted 12-01-2017 06:33 PM

Thank You Gentlemen. Spoke with my provider and they only make arbor nuts for right tilt saws. Seems more likely that my arbor has enough thread damage that it’s hindering the nut. I plan to take a file and lapping compound to it to see if I cannot bring it back to life.

David

-- I make trees cry.

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

6017 posts in 2039 days


#5 posted 12-01-2017 06:47 PM

Hmmmm… when you said ”opposite pitch” I took that as meaning it had the opposite thread direction (what exactly is an opposite pitch?!? :) Anyway, looking at the picture of yours, the threads look fine, but if you compare it to the one I show, there is a flat area on the very end that yours doesn’t have. Regardless, if it’s just the start of the threads being buggered up, a small needle file should get you going in no time fairly easily. Size and TPI are all the same, as they haven’t changed since introduced in the late 30’s.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View Imakenicefirewood's profile

Imakenicefirewood

67 posts in 1196 days


#6 posted 12-01-2017 07:10 PM

I bought one from this place when I was rebuilding a 1980 model. It was a right tilt, and the nut fit fine. I also put the nut on my 1952 model to see if they were the same, and it fit fine.

http://www.sawcenter.com/unisawparts.htm

Good luck.

View David Schwarz's profile

David Schwarz

69 posts in 57 days


#7 posted 12-01-2017 10:39 PM

Hey Brad – you understood correctly, by opposite pitch I did indeed mean opposite thread direction. I’ve confirmed that I was wrong (see number three in my original post). Most likely I have some threads at the tip of the arbor that are in need of a little TLC. I’ll get that all fixed up during this weekend’s assembly :-)

The Village Idiot,
David

-- I make trees cry.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

4766 posts in 2333 days


#8 posted 12-01-2017 10:50 PM

Ereplacment parts claim they have a limited number ($22, ouch!) and don’t forget you’ll need the flange as well if you don’t have the OEM. That arbor has Acme threads so you won’t be able to just pick up any old nut that’s the right size and have it work.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View Nubsnstubs's profile

Nubsnstubs

1207 posts in 1570 days


#9 posted 12-02-2017 02:31 AM

While you’re cleaning up the threads, clean up that edge of the arbor flange. Looks a little unsavory. ....... Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson) www.woodturnerstools.com

View David Schwarz's profile

David Schwarz

69 posts in 57 days


#10 posted 12-02-2017 02:37 PM


While you re cleaning up the threads, clean up that edge of the arbor flange. Looks a little unsavory. ....... Jerry (in Tucson)

- Nubsnstubs


I know – it looks terrible, right? It’s actually primer lying underneath the black paint. I thought it would be a great idea, but the end result wasn’t quite up to par. Most likely I’m just going to strip all that paint off until I’m down to the original metal.

-- I make trees cry.

View David Schwarz's profile

David Schwarz

69 posts in 57 days


#11 posted 12-02-2017 02:54 PM



Ereplacment parts claim they have a limited number ($22, ouch!) and don t forget you ll need the flange as well if you don t have the OEM. That arbor has Acme threads so you won t be able to just pick up any old nut that s the right size and have it work.

- Fred Hargis



I bought one from this place when I was rebuilding a 1980 model. It was a right tilt, and the nut fit fine. I also put the nut on my 1952 model to see if they were the same, and it fit fine.

http://www.sawcenter.com/unisawparts.htm

Good luck.


Confession time – I actually sourced parts from three different vendors. They included eReplacementParts, The Saw Center and a gentleman named Bob who provides a rather nice (though somewhat limited) collection of Unisaw parts on eBay (look for pd2bob). Among those parts are rather stout versions of the arbor nut and retaining flange. The flange looks like a mirror copy of the flange “built into” the arbor. The arbor nut looks like this:

Because I’m a rather odd guy that isn’t too good when it comes to trust (in this case both quality and delivery timelines). I ordered some duplicate parts from different vendors. Having done that, I can tell you that Bob’s version of the retaining flange is superior to what you can buy from eReplacement. I don’t yet have the nut from The Saw Center – I’m still waiting for that package to be delivered (I think they’re actually out of arbor nuts). Once I have everything in hand I’ll post comparison photos as well as a direct link to Bob’s eBay “store”.

-- I make trees cry.

View David Schwarz's profile

David Schwarz

69 posts in 57 days


#12 posted 12-02-2017 02:56 PM



Right tilt saw; left hand thread. It is either a 5/8-6 or a 5/8-8 thread, Count the number of threads per inch on the arbor https://www.mcmaster.com/#91808a027/=1ahwoi0

- MrRon


I didn’t realize they sold flanges with different thread counts (oh my I think in my best Dorothy voice). Hopefully that’s not the source of my issue – I’ll need to take a closer look.

-- I make trees cry.

View runswithscissors's profile

runswithscissors

2565 posts in 1865 days


#13 posted 12-03-2017 04:49 AM

You can make your own arbor washer. Using a hole saw, cut a disk of the right diameter (same as your arbor flange) from 3/16” mild steel. Counterbore to 5/8”. Clamp the big washer in a vise face up. Using a 4.5 inch angle grinder, grind a hollow in the washer by tilting the disk and moving it about. Stay away from the edges. This hollow is necessary because the arbor flange is hollow, and if you use a flat washer, it will distort the blade.

This is simple and cheap. Works perfectly.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

View David Schwarz's profile

David Schwarz

69 posts in 57 days


#14 posted 12-03-2017 03:54 PM



You can make your own arbor washer. Using a hole saw, cut a disk of the right diameter (same as your arbor flange) from 3/16” mild steel. Counterbore to 5/8”. Clamp the big washer in a vise face up. Using a 4.5 inch angle grinder, grind a hollow in the washer by tilting the disk and moving it about. Stay away from the edges. This hollow is necessary because the arbor flange is hollow, and if you use a flat washer, it will distort the blade.

This is simple and cheap. Works perfectly.

- runswithscissors


Fabrication is fun – I know. I think I will have had my fill in this project once I complete the guide rails for the VSCT fence. My next “fabrication” project is going to be something with wood again :-)

With respect to the flange, here are a couple photos comparing stock to what I purchased from Pd2bob:

With respect to the arbor nut, I did finally get it properly threaded on. But it wasn’t easy! Bob the supplier actually suggested lapping it on with valve grinding compound. At first I thought there was no way it was going to work, but after about 20 minutes of progressively threading it on, backing it off and then threading on a little bit further each time (using a big adjustable wrench and a vice to lock down the arbor spindle), I was rewarded with this:

I didn’t thread it all the way down for the photo simply so you can see that the threads look the same. But now I can thread it on easily with finger and thumb. Those threads were apparently really mucked up.

-- I make trees cry.

View Nubsnstubs's profile

Nubsnstubs

1207 posts in 1570 days


#15 posted 12-03-2017 05:32 PM

The stock nut for an 86-87 Unisaw should be 1/4” – .250” thick. The one you show looks to be a lot thicker than that, thus causing more friction than with a thinner nut. Unless your pictures are lying, your threads do not look that messed up to be giving you the grief you are experiencing. The threads on my saw look almost exactly like the first picture you posted of the threads on your arbor. ........... Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson) www.woodturnerstools.com

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