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Forum topic by Kilo19 posted 11-30-2017 02:48 PM 348 views 0 times favorited 21 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Kilo19

56 posts in 58 days


11-30-2017 02:48 PM

Topic tags/keywords: guitar case stand guitar furniture stand

So yesterday I was asked by a coworker, that knows and has seen some of the wood working projects I’ve done out of pallets, and wants me to make her a guitar case stand for her signifacant other. (see pic) She showed me this and was like “can you make that?”

Well anything can be made with enough time, money and glue right?? LOL any way its gonna hold about 5 cases, but my biggest concern is glueing up a slab that big (the sides) with pallet slats. I do not have a biscuit jointer, (kinda wish I did) but was wondering if a lap joint would work better than….(normally I will do a butt joint, but they tend to move a tiny bit, and that tiny bit ends up hrs of sanding and working.)

If this was on your todo list, what would you consider to be a good/decent joint for something that large.

I do not have sizes yet, she is getting them to me, but the sides should be about the size of a guitar case, and how long?, well about 5 cases. So however many inches that comes out to is what I’m looking at. For the runners on the bottom and back I’m thinking some 1×4 that I have in long lengths or laminated pallets about 1/4” think maybe 3 layers.

Project isn’t due till middle of Jan 18’

Thanks.

-- Justin


21 replies so far

View JCamp's profile

JCamp

470 posts in 383 days


#1 posted 11-30-2017 03:08 PM

A nice grade of plywood would b the easiest if you could get it to look right. Other than that I don’t have any advice or the joints.
Regular guitar cases for acoustics are around 8-10 inch wide but electric are generally around 6 inches. So for that top piece I’d suggest you doing holes every 4 inches and leave the pegs out so the owner can adjust them as needed. Very few guitar players only keep the same number of guitars so his collection might go up or down some so you might also ask if the lady would lik a “spare” spot for her husbands next guitar or mandolin.. or banjo…. or bass. You get the picture. Lol.

-- Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with all thy might

View johnstoneb's profile

johnstoneb

2631 posts in 2005 days


#2 posted 11-30-2017 03:57 PM

Those are plywood or MDF sides.

-- Bruce, Boise, ID

View tomsteve's profile

tomsteve

660 posts in 1052 days


#3 posted 11-30-2017 05:27 PM

what catches my attention is that you were shown a picture and asked if you can make that, then plan on using pallet wood. that stand in the picture wasnt made with pallet wood. that one looks like a $300 stand and dimensions found here
https://www.guitarstorage.com/shop/studio-standard-guitar-case-rack/
was using pallet wood mentioned to the buyer?

looks like its designed to be taken apart,too.

View Kilo19's profile

Kilo19

56 posts in 58 days


#4 posted 11-30-2017 05:31 PM



what catches my attention is that you were shown a picture and asked if you can make that, then plan on using pallet wood. that stand in the picture wasnt made with pallet wood. that one looks like a $300 stand and dimensions found here
https://www.guitarstorage.com/shop/studio-standard-guitar-case-rack/
was using pallet wood mentioned to the buyer?

- tomsteve

Sorry if I wasn’t clear, yes she came to me asking if can make one like that. Knowing that I make most of my items out of pallets asked if I can one of these out of pallets. I don’t think it would be any different then making a cabinet that I made months ago, (as far as gluing up boards to make a slab), but this isn’t a cabinet, and may get moved around more then a stationary screwed to the wall type cabinet.

-- Justin

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

8287 posts in 1319 days


#5 posted 11-30-2017 05:35 PM

Question: if youre using pallet wood as a source of stock and not for its stupid looks (sorry I hate it :) then I’m assuming it’ll be dimensioned and you could use splines or a tongue and groove bit maybe? Even if it is used weathered and uneven with just butt joints I wouldn’t worry too much as long as the seams don’t over lap.

And hand planes are a wonderful thing if it does slip a bit.

You can

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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Kilo19

56 posts in 58 days


#6 posted 11-30-2017 05:59 PM



Question: if youre using pallet wood as a source of stock and not for its stupid looks (sorry I hate it :) then I m assuming it ll be dimensioned and you could use splines or a tongue and groove bit maybe? Even if it is used weathered and uneven with just butt joints I wouldn t worry too much as long as the seams don t over lap.

And hand planes are a wonderful thing if it does slip a bit.

You can

- TheFridge

Yes I’ll dimension it, but was looking at maybe a better way to join them together (rather then butt joints). I can do a lap joint from the table saw…I don’t have a router yet…on my to buy list.

-- Justin

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

14830 posts in 2451 days


#7 posted 11-30-2017 06:02 PM

Glued joints, if jointed properly, do not need mechanical aides for strength

If you want a truly smooth end panel and don’t have hand planes or want to sand like crazy, use panel stock (plywood) vs. pallet wood

Conversely, go with Fridge’s suggestion and don’t worry too much / go with your pallet wood style. just make sure it’s alder, or he’ll (fridge) not like it even more.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

View Loren's profile (online now)

Loren

9602 posts in 3481 days


#8 posted 11-30-2017 06:14 PM

Pin nails with the heads clipped off can
keep glue joints from slipping around.

I recently read the same thing about mixing
salt into the glue.

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

8287 posts in 1319 days


#9 posted 11-30-2017 06:17 PM

Definitely use alder. Non-use of alder can result in a permanent ban from LJs.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View Tennessee's profile

Tennessee

2587 posts in 2347 days


#10 posted 11-30-2017 06:31 PM

You must have access to some fairly big pallets to do this type of project. Seems though, if you laid out one 4X8 piece of nice birch plywood, maybe 5/8 or 3/4 thick, you could do a bang up job and it seems like you could get the whole project out of one sheet, and nice looks also.

And no offense to your coworker, but this comes under the category of “Let me see if my friend can do this cheaper so we don’t have to spend all that money for the real thing.” Used to get that all the time in guitar builds – people would show me a picture of a $4000-6000 guitar, and ask if I could build it for under a $1000. AND, they wanted custom touches added.

-- Tsunami Guitars and Custom Woodworking, Cleveland, TN

View Loren's profile (online now)

Loren

9602 posts in 3481 days


#11 posted 11-30-2017 06:37 PM

I agree with what Tennessee says.

I might try to figure out a way to join together
a frame for each end in a trapezoid shape.
That will eliminate some of the surface sanding,
all the edge gluing, use less material and be
lighter.

If you use plywood for the ends in that curvy
shape you’ll find edgebanding is a real pita.
You can use t-molding but you’d need a router
for that.

View Tennessee's profile

Tennessee

2587 posts in 2347 days


#12 posted 11-30-2017 06:45 PM

Actually, looking at the real thing they asked you to copy, it looks like either the edges are sanded, filled and painted black, or have that black plastic edging on it that has that little spline that goes into a small groove in the middle of the edge.

-- Tsunami Guitars and Custom Woodworking, Cleveland, TN

View Rick_M's profile

Rick_M

10599 posts in 2213 days


#13 posted 11-30-2017 07:37 PM

There are easier ways to solve your problem than shiplapping. You can make cauls that are slightly raised in the center to push the boards flush where clamps can’t reach. Or you can run a spline but it will have to be perfect, which means your pallet wood will need to be milled perfectly, or it won’t help at all. Really I think cauls are the best solution.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View buckbuster31's profile

buckbuster31

193 posts in 348 days


#14 posted 11-30-2017 08:32 PM

just buy my biscuit jointer that I will sell cheap…however I don’t the biscuit is the right answer for this haha

View Kilo19's profile

Kilo19

56 posts in 58 days


#15 posted 11-30-2017 08:37 PM



just buy my biscuit jointer that I will sell cheap…however I don t the biscuit is the right answer for this haha

- buckbuster31

Hmm….how much?

I like the idea of the cauls…don’t have any built yet, maybe this will be a reason to build some.

In the end I may be over thinking this. I do have kinda free range to change the look of it as well. I was kinda thinking of doing skelton type frame (not so much wood to glue, but may be harder to glue pieces together.)unless I look at a nice piece of plywood to use.

-- Justin

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