LumberJocks

BLO & Epoxy on a Red Oak Table Top

  • Advertise with us

« back to Finishing forum

Forum topic by zvelivis posted 11-30-2017 01:53 PM 200 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View zvelivis's profile

zvelivis

3 posts in 14 days


11-30-2017 01:53 PM

Topic tags/keywords: table top read oad

I have a red oak table top that is just about ready to finish. Our plan was to use boiled Linseed Oil on the top and base. Next we are having a large logo printed on the top. My question is should I wait a few weeks to have the logo printed on the top? Once we have the logo printed on we want to do a flood epoxy poor. This will be the day room table in our firehouse.

Someone had said we can’t put the epoxy directly over the BLO. Is this true? Are there other finishing options we should consider?


6 replies so far

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

1185 posts in 417 days


#1 posted 11-30-2017 02:15 PM

Put a couple coats of shellac between the two and you’ll be fine, but BLO will prevent the epoxy from curing if it’s not sealed off by a layer of shellac.

Depending on how you’re printing the logo, you might find it easier to print either before the BLO or after the shellac, but there are so many printing technologies and inks, it’s hard to say for sure what’s best without knowing how you’ll be printing.

-- Dave - Minneapolis

View johnstoneb's profile

johnstoneb

2634 posts in 2007 days


#2 posted 11-30-2017 02:32 PM

Would somebody explain to me why BLO would prevent epoxy from curing. BLO cures with an exothermic reaction ( this is why you don’t leave BLO soaked rags wadded up and laying around). Epoxy cures with a chemical reaction between a resin and an activator that are mixed externally just before application. Once the BLO has dried there is no way for the 2 to mix. You do need to wait for the BLO to cure and it is slow drying.

-- Bruce, Boise, ID

View zvelivis's profile

zvelivis

3 posts in 14 days


#3 posted 11-30-2017 02:44 PM

I just spoke with West systems tech support. They recommend that we use a water based stain dye from wdlockwood in New York or just apply the epoxy directly to the wood.

View jonah's profile

jonah

1447 posts in 3133 days


#4 posted 11-30-2017 02:48 PM

IIRC, BLO takes a week or two to fully cure. It will feel dry within a day or two, but it’s not fully cured for a long time afterwards. So if you’re putting something over it, you’ll need to wait that long.

Is there any particular reason you want to use BLO under the epoxy? Why not use a water or oil based polyurethane or varnish?

View zvelivis's profile

zvelivis

3 posts in 14 days


#5 posted 11-30-2017 02:56 PM

We really liked the color we got when we did a test piece with the BLO. I think we are going to avoid using any type of oil under the epoxy. The water based stain dye seems to be the safest option. The dye is cheap too. Only need about 1 ounce of the powder to make 1 quart of stain and its like $7.

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

1185 posts in 417 days


#6 posted 11-30-2017 07:28 PM

Would somebody explain to me why BLO would prevent epoxy from curing.

Don’t have the chemical chops to explain it, but I’ve tried it, and even waiting a week between the BLO and epoxy, no curing without a layer of shellac in between. The epoxy just stays soft and you can scrape it off with a fingernail a week later.

Two or three coats of shellac on top of the BLO and all is well.

As to why do it, for me it’s been about the color. There’s probably another way to get there, quite possibly even with an amber shellac, but I didn’t get the same color with polyurethane or varnish.

-- Dave - Minneapolis

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com