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Forum topic by Froggy10 posted 11-30-2017 01:51 PM 734 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Froggy10

5 posts in 351 days


11-30-2017 01:51 PM

I am in the process of building a table and I am having trouble with the skirt. I choose to do the skirt with segments because I have never steam bent wood before and figure this wasn’t the project to learn. I have a total of 24 segments and planned to use a router to complete the shape once attached to the table top.


18 replies so far

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LittleShaver

411 posts in 792 days


#1 posted 11-30-2017 02:49 PM

So what is the problem?

-- Sawdust Maker

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Froggy10

5 posts in 351 days


#2 posted 11-30-2017 02:53 PM

Sorry. What is the best way to glue up the segments before the glue sets?

View Gilley23's profile

Gilley23

489 posts in 554 days


#3 posted 11-30-2017 03:05 PM

Lay them all out flat on a table with the strap or tape underneath of it. Glue, spread and roll it all up. The painter’s tape will make a good clamp. Get someone to help you pick it up and set into place on the table.

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PPK

1182 posts in 982 days


#4 posted 11-30-2017 04:37 PM

Use a slow-setting glue such as hide glue. Looks like a neat table!

-- Pete

View CharlesNeil's profile

CharlesNeil

2451 posts in 4043 days


#5 posted 11-30-2017 05:21 PM

glue up 3 or 4 sections, at a time

this might help explain using tape to clamp.. works well use good heavy tape
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9m4jEiekLKY

View rbrjr1's profile

rbrjr1

170 posts in 378 days


#6 posted 11-30-2017 07:18 PM

from a big orange box store, you can buy the 3M blue painters tape in a 10” wide roll.. it’s perfect for something like this..

-- only an idiot dismisses an intelligent statement because they dont know anything about the person delivering it.

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PPK

1182 posts in 982 days


#7 posted 11-30-2017 07:27 PM

The other thing I’d consider doing is not fastening the skirt solidly on the sides that the grain runs paralell. Then the movement of the tabletop won’t break open your mitered skirt, or crack the table top as it expands and contracts with moisture changes…

So for instance in your picture, don’t fasten it in the 1 and 2 o-clock positions or the 7 to 9 o-clock positions. Hopefully that makes sense. Or at least use slotted holes to allow for movement.

-- Pete

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BlasterStumps

942 posts in 612 days


#8 posted 11-30-2017 07:36 PM

this is too late for this project obviously but next time, you might want to consider kerf cutting the “skirt”. I did kerf cutting on the apron for our oak table way back in the early ‘80s that is still good shape today.

-- "I build for function first, looks second. Most times I never get around to looks." - Mike, western Colorado

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rbrjr1

170 posts in 378 days


#9 posted 12-04-2017 10:27 AM



this is too late for this project obviously but next time, you might want to consider kerf cutting the “skirt”. I did kerf cutting on the apron for our oak table way back in the early 80s that is still good shape today.

- BlasterStumps


I agree, but would like to note that the segmented circle that OP used for the skirt gives the piece a nice look.

-- only an idiot dismisses an intelligent statement because they dont know anything about the person delivering it.

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Froggy10

5 posts in 351 days


#10 posted 12-04-2017 05:59 PM

After a fail├Ęd attempt using the segments, I ended up laminating the skirt. Here is a pic of the (almost) completed project. Still have to sand and buff.

View LesB's profile

LesB

1838 posts in 3615 days


#11 posted 12-04-2017 06:09 PM

I agree with those that are concerned about the joints on the segments failing.
I have done a couple of table skirts and I laminated 1/8” plywood layers (in a form) to build up the thickness and then added a veneer to the outside that matched the wood being used. This was done 1/2 of the circle at a time. Make the half circle over long and trim. This is very strong and actually adds structural strength to the top.

-- Les B, Oregon

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Froggy10

5 posts in 351 days


#12 posted 12-04-2017 06:16 PM

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Smitty_Cabinetshop

15647 posts in 2791 days


#13 posted 12-04-2017 06:18 PM

Congrats on the build, Froggy. Looks like a very nice table.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

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Froggy10

5 posts in 351 days


#14 posted 12-04-2017 11:45 PM

Thank you

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

2559 posts in 1560 days


#15 posted 12-05-2017 05:52 AM

I’m also concerned that the end grain glue joints are going to be pretty weak. It’ll be a pain to cut so many slots in the ends, especially with the angle, but a spline would help strengthen the glue joints. Splines will also aid in getting and keeping everything aligned as you glue and clamp.

+1 on using liquid hide glue or another formulated for long open time to facilitate gluing so many joints at once.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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