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Black Walnut log

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Forum topic by ohiogary posted 02-27-2011 04:18 AM 1932 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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ohiogary

15 posts in 2113 days


02-27-2011 04:18 AM

Today was a great day…..bagged a big one…..a huge walnut log that must be 48” in diameter, the stump of the log is probally 8’ then branches off to a nice 12’ log about 26 ” diameter atleast, and then another piece probally 16” dia. and 8 ft. long. The logs are fairly straight except where they come together, where there should be some awesome figured crotch lumber, One piece has a burl about 16” dia. and maybe 10” thick., Can not wait to saw it. when I do I will post pictures of this monster.

-- Gary


12 replies so far

View Barbara Gill's profile

Barbara Gill

153 posts in 2123 days


#1 posted 02-27-2011 05:51 AM

Gary what kind of mill do you have?

-- Barbara

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ohiogary

15 posts in 2113 days


#2 posted 02-27-2011 01:51 PM

I have a TK 1220 band mill, Barbara the only draw back of it is I am not going to be able to saw the stump part of the log, I may have to take the log else wheres and have them saw the stump section, I can saw up to 29 inches, At the very base there is some some rot in the center, hard to tell how far it goes up, I have considered cutting the main stump into a 4-5 ft length, depending on actual length and try splitting with spliting wedges, of course I dont like the idea but not sure what else to do. Have you encountered this situation?

-- Gary

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ohiogary

15 posts in 2113 days


#3 posted 02-27-2011 01:54 PM

I am also looking at the root ball, I might try to dig up the stump, power wash and try to saw some of the solid parts.

-- Gary

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Barbara Gill

153 posts in 2123 days


#4 posted 02-27-2011 03:10 PM

I am not familiar with the capabilities of your mill; I have a WoodMizer. I run into the problem frequently with large logs. I have solved the problem in several ways depending upon the situation. One is my husband used to split really big logs down the center with a chainsaw with a 36” bar and ripping chain (he is too old now). Depending upon the confirmation of the log sometimes I have been able to take cuts as high away from the bed as I can and still pass. Then I will turn the log a little and keep nibbling away until I can pass down the length of the log. The other approach is to carve away enough of the log with your chainsaw (often involves cutting out a block) so that the head can pass. Sometimes the flair at the bottom is such that you will only have to make two cuts with the chainsaw, one ripping and the other 90 degrees to it to free the piece.

-- Barbara

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McKinneyMike

80 posts in 2124 days


#5 posted 02-27-2011 04:26 PM

Be ready for damaged saw blades cutting into a root ball. The root ball wi9ll envelop small rocks, dirt, etc as the tree grows. There could be some nice wood in the root ball, but be prepared for some frustration and damaged/destroyed blades. As Barbara has stated, logs of that size will probably need to be ripped before you can cut them. I to use a Husky 372XP w/36” bar and ripping chain for these types of operations.

-- McKinney Hardwood Lumber --Specializing in exotic and figured hardwood lumber http://www.mckinneyhardwoods.com -McKinney, TX

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Barbara Gill

153 posts in 2123 days


#6 posted 02-27-2011 04:55 PM

I spent hours with a spud and pressure sprayer getting a root ball clear of stuff. We don’t have many rocks around here but there is ample clay, sand and oyster shells as well as bricks, pottery, etc. It was worth the trouble though. I was not a turner then so the wood went into gunstock blanks.
If you can avoid ripping the whole log it will be good. I have some 21” wide walnut boards. It is hard for woodworkers to find stock that wide.

-- Barbara

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McKinneyMike

80 posts in 2124 days


#7 posted 02-27-2011 05:43 PM

I am from Missouri and the ground is full of small rocks :) Beautiful wood to be had from root balls, but much aggravation sometimes too. I never understood why people are so afraid of using wide lumber for projects. If one were to look in a museum, there are many examples of furniture wiuth single board tops and sides that have made it over 200 years without issue. Normally a board that is that wide has came from a large old growth tree and the lumber tends to be much more stable than a 6” boards from a 25 years old tree IME. Barbara weren’t you a member of Badger Pond wood working forum from years ago. Your name sounds familiar to me.

-- McKinney Hardwood Lumber --Specializing in exotic and figured hardwood lumber http://www.mckinneyhardwoods.com -McKinney, TX

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Barbara Gill

153 posts in 2123 days


#8 posted 02-27-2011 06:26 PM

Yes Mike I was; I have been around the Internet woodworking sites for over 15 years. It is so nice to hear someone praise the virtues of wide boards. I have also found that branch wood is not always difficult to work. We have a table made from curved pieces of beautiful wood. The boards were sawn from a curved walnut branch. The table was made for us by a French woodworker. My husband designed it. All I did was saw the wood.
One of the floors in our house has a number of 15” Southern Yellow Pine planks. The widest run is 17”. There is virtually no cupping in the driest part of the winter. There is the normal shrink and swell associated with the altering humidity.

-- Barbara

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McKinneyMike

80 posts in 2124 days


#9 posted 02-27-2011 06:46 PM

I have used a lot of wider boards over the years as I hate glueups and the way that the results look to me. I don’t care how hard one selects lumber, one solid board always looks better for me :) I bet those pine floors are gorgeous too! Love pine floors.

-- McKinney Hardwood Lumber --Specializing in exotic and figured hardwood lumber http://www.mckinneyhardwoods.com -McKinney, TX

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ohiogary

15 posts in 2113 days


#10 posted 02-28-2011 02:34 AM

Thank for everyones suggestion, first thing I got to look at the log and decide where I want to cut it for length, Ive had to deal with large pines, and cherrys, you never no what youre going to find inside it until you open it up, Ive had very large cherry logs think, this is going to be some beautiful lumber and end up finding a sap pocket thru out the log, then once in a while you find that beautiful figure of flaming cherry, or some of the unusual grain patterns. Ive been blessed to be able to obtain a mill about 8 years ago, you dont think of it as hard work, more like treasure hunting…...but unfortunately I use most of my lumber for projects for the house and some customers. I tried the ebay thing selling 8/4 12/4 stock, but ups seemed to be making more money than I. I agree root balls are tough, hard to get a sizable piece of lumber, but the grain pattern is incredible.

-- Gary

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Sawmillnc

150 posts in 2517 days


#11 posted 03-01-2011 03:58 AM

Slab it..

-- Kyle Edwards, http://www.sawmillnc.com, Iron Station , NC (near Charlotte)

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WoodLe

155 posts in 2259 days


#12 posted 03-01-2011 05:35 AM

Hey, I’m from Ohio and would be interested in slabbing it for part of the lumber. I have a chainsaw mill that cuts 54” wide. If you’re interested, message me. Thanks

-- www.largewoodslabs.com Wooster, Ohio

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