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Forum topic by Marpel posted 11-28-2017 01:22 AM 410 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Marpel

9 posts in 125 days


11-28-2017 01:22 AM

I just purchased a 4in x 10ft hose (Dustfx brand) for my dust collection system. The hose is flexible clear polyurethane, with a copper wire that is embedded within the material of the hose, at least for structural integrity.

The hose is a CWI brand and was purchased directly from the store. The website description of the hose states there is no need to run some wire inside the hose for static electricity as the embedded wire serves that purpose as well.

I ran a continuity test by holding the prongs on the inside of the poly, immediately over the wire, but could not get any reading (suggesting the poly is not conductive??).

I later returned to the store to clear up my confusion and was told by an employee that the embedded wire should not be used to mitigate static issues and when advised the website says differently, responded that the website is wrong. The employee then stated that short run hoses do not even need anything for static electricity. A difference of opinion “discussion” then ensued between two employees over the correctness of the website info and this employee’s assertion.

I should also mention that the manual for the dust collector (Grizzly), has a section in which it lays out how to run a wire through the hose, to prevent static electricity.

As I know little of this particular topic, does anyone with experience in this area know the real truth?? If unneeded, I do not want to go through the hassle of running static wires for the set-up as the collector gets hooked up to different machines and, as the hose shrinks and stretches, the internal wire would occasionally get bunched up when in use and may “catch” small pieces of wood.

Thanks,

Marv


9 replies so far

View sawdustdad's profile

sawdustdad

334 posts in 720 days


#1 posted 11-28-2017 01:52 AM

If your hose is connected to metal ductwork, that will dissipate any static charge. In my previous shop, using PVC pipe, I ran a wire around the exterior of the duct and grounded that. I put a few pop rivets through the PVC duct to bleed off the static charge—though I never saw any evidence that static charges were building up. I’ve got metal duct now, so I don’t worry about it any more.

I think the risk of static build up in a home shop DC system is overstated. You’d need to collecting a huge amount of fine sanding dust to create a combustible mixture. Most tools make chips, not dust, so explosive conditions don’t occur.

I’d be interested if hearing if anyone EVER had a problem from static in a hobbyist DC system.

-- Murphy's Carpentry Corollary #3: Half of all boards cut to a specific length will be too short.

View Carloz's profile

Carloz

966 posts in 427 days


#2 posted 11-28-2017 02:04 AM

You need a megohmmeter to measure resistance that can affect static electricity. A regular dyi tester won’t work.

View hairy's profile

hairy

2583 posts in 3368 days


#3 posted 11-28-2017 02:21 AM

At times I have noticed the hairs on my arms stand up straight when I get close to the DC hose when running. All my hose is flex hose or solid PVC pipe, not grounded.

I’m sure the static will never approach a dangerous level. I have no plans to ground it. I have never gotten sparked from my DC hose. My Lazyboy recliner is a different story, I get zapped all the time after getting up.

-- My reality check bounced...

View becikeja's profile

becikeja

823 posts in 2649 days


#4 posted 11-28-2017 12:55 PM

Ground wires are always a good safety precaution when connecting to any metal incased motor (ie.. dust collector, table saw…..). Now the question, is it necessary? Static electricity can build up and combust a concentration of saw dust. Yes it is possible, how high is the risk, I have no idea. I personally do not run a ground wire on my dust collection hoses, and really don’t see a need to. This weekend I did a get a static charge off my drum sander, nothing more than grabbing a door knob in the winter time. I don’t believe the risk is high enough to worry about it.

-- Don't outsmart your common sense

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

4756 posts in 2329 days


#5 posted 11-28-2017 09:44 PM

Unless you’re having a problem with personal comfort, you are worrying about a non event.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View Marpel's profile

Marpel

9 posts in 125 days


#6 posted 11-29-2017 12:51 AM

Thanks to everyone for their replies. All good information and in light of that, I doubt I will run any extra wire.

Weird, though, that the hose manufacturer, the employees at the store and the dust collector manufacturer all had differing opinions on the subject.

View becikeja's profile

becikeja

823 posts in 2649 days


#7 posted 11-29-2017 01:42 AM

Think about it. In the litigious world we live in, if the hose manufacturer did not advise to ground it and something did happen, you could sue. If the possibility exists even remotely they have to warn against it.

-- Don't outsmart your common sense

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

4756 posts in 2329 days


#8 posted 11-29-2017 11:54 AM



Think about it. In the litigious world we live in, if the hose manufacturer did not advise to ground it and something did happen, you could sue. If the possibility exists even remotely they have to warn against it.

- becikeja

Yep, when you go through a McD’s drive through you might notice a window decal advising that their “coffee is hot, handle with care”.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View John_H's profile

John_H

58 posts in 1541 days


#9 posted 11-29-2017 04:48 PM

I am with the ‘non event’ people :)

I have 10’ of 5” and often connect another 10’ of 4” to reach my bandsaw and never had any issues. By the way, I have the hose from WynnEnvironmental that came highly recommended. 10’ of 5” in 20 mil thickness was about $110 with shipping, but it’s ‘good stuff’ (no regrets)

https://wynnenv.com/products-page/woodworking_hose/20-mil-clear-urethane-hose/

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