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Forum topic by matt5 posted 02-25-2011 05:14 PM 6182 views 0 times favorited 41 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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matt5

82 posts in 2158 days


02-25-2011 05:14 PM

I have a black walnut log. 36 inches on the small end ten feet long. Its vaneer quality I think, but I am considering keeping it to finish the boats interrior. I have read the pros and cons of quarter sawing? What would you do with this log?

-- I've cut it twice, but its still to short....


41 replies so far

View chrisstef's profile

chrisstef

15676 posts in 2473 days


#1 posted 02-25-2011 05:21 PM

by no means am i an expert, but from what i have read around here ther isnt much of an advantage to quarter sawing walnut. You wont get nearly as much out of the tree in comparison to flat sawing it. Great wood gloat though … makes me want to start inspecting the trees on my property.

-- rock, chalk, jayhawk

View Barbara Gill's profile

Barbara Gill

153 posts in 2127 days


#2 posted 02-25-2011 05:21 PM

Part of the beauty of Walnut is the flat grain figure. I never have quarter/rift sawn it for that reason. If you want to get some quarter sawn boards possibly to show off a flat sawn panel you can use some of the boards near the pith. I have found that wood from large walnuts is pretty stable. I would also cut at least one 8/4 slab for legs if you think you might make something that needs them.
If there is a bifurcation at the small end or if there was a large limb that came from the butt log I would definitely saw for the figure.
Oh yeah, I would save those flared out pieces at the large end for bowls. :-)

-- Barbara

View McKinneyMike's profile

McKinneyMike

80 posts in 2128 days


#3 posted 02-25-2011 05:31 PM

Flat saw the log. There are a few instances where qtr walnut might have a use, but as a rule you want the grain to be a part of the look with walnut. If you were making door frames with it all, by all means quarter sawn lumber is more stable and the straight grain would help frame a flat sawn panel so to not distract from it. Cherry and walnut are two woods that you are far better off flat sawing over all, unless you want a more modern look(straight grain without a lot of drama) to your project.

-- McKinney Hardwood Lumber --Specializing in exotic and figured hardwood lumber http://www.mckinneyhardwoods.com -McKinney, TX

View Loren's profile

Loren

8314 posts in 3115 days


#4 posted 02-25-2011 05:46 PM

I don’t think walnut looks very interesting on the quarter. Of course
it would be more stable and the figure more regular, but those aren’t
qualities we normally prioritize when working with walnut.

View matt5's profile

matt5

82 posts in 2158 days


#5 posted 02-25-2011 06:07 PM

Thanks for the comments. I couldn’t find any one to quarter it anyway, so flat saw it is. I lucked into this. It was in the news paper free for cleaning up the mess. I cut all 4 of them. I plan to saw off the big end and build a table out of it. It’s 60 by 36 inches. Are there any tricks to prevent checking and cracking while it cures?There is a bifercation on the small end, but it will cut off and still leave a ten foot log. Thanks again.

-- I've cut it twice, but its still to short....

View tnwood's profile

tnwood

249 posts in 2553 days


#6 posted 02-25-2011 06:34 PM

The ends of the log need to be sealed immediately to keep it from checking and cracking. Either use Anchor Seal or several coats of paint. Once it is milled, get it stacked on dry stickers covered to keep the rain off it but with lots of ventilation to remove the moisture. The thicker the slab, the slower to dry. By the way, air dried walnut always looks much richer to me.

View Nomad62's profile

Nomad62

726 posts in 2425 days


#7 posted 02-25-2011 06:39 PM

The benefit to q-sawing is that you get the widest 1-piece cut you can. Slicing the slabs off of the edges gets you the most attractive wood, but it tends to warp the easiest; q-sawing a piece a few inches off the pith gives you the most stable piece; you can’t do both, it seems nothing is free. If you want to make a big table top you will either need to slab it to get that big piece or glue two smaller ones together; I like the glue-ups better than the q-sawn, but that’s only an opinion. Nice grab on a great log, good luck with it.

-- Power tools put us ahead of the monkeys

View Barbara Gill's profile

Barbara Gill

153 posts in 2127 days


#8 posted 02-25-2011 07:23 PM

From what you said Matt it sounds as if you are going to make the table out of a cross sawn section from the end of the log. There is one thing you can count on; it will crack. One way you can still end up with the natural edge piece is to cut the piece for the table into several pie shaped pieces. Once the wood has dried the pieces can be surfaced and fit back together. This topic has been discussed to death over on the Wood Web Sawing and Drying Forum. Everything from soaking it in a small inflatable pool of PEG to just allowing it to crack has been examined and talked about.
You can go over there and search to find the different discussions.

-- Barbara

View matt5's profile

matt5

82 posts in 2158 days


#9 posted 02-25-2011 07:54 PM

Thanks Barbara. I will. .....dont want to screw this one up.

-- I've cut it twice, but its still to short....

View matt5's profile

matt5

82 posts in 2158 days


#10 posted 12-15-2011 06:17 PM

Its been a while since my last post.
Last month I took 500 bd ft of walnut out of the kiln and stacked it in my basement where I can keep it a 6.5% MC . I have another 1000 bd ft in the kiln now and that much more stickered and waiting to go in. Last week I quarter sawed some beautiful white oak. Im a newby at running a saw mill and I am amazed at how much more wood you get out of a log when its quarter sawed, and the wood looks so much better. I think the oak and walnut will look great together on the inside of my boat.

The base cut that I plan to build a table out of has not cracked or split yet. Its out side about 8 inches off the ground, under a piece of tin roofing. Fingers crossed it dosent crack.

-- I've cut it twice, but its still to short....

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

13003 posts in 2160 days


#11 posted 12-15-2011 06:42 PM

I’m not a boat builder, so perhaps there’s an advantage to quarter sawing? That’s such a beautiful tree that the waste involved with quarter sawing would bother me. It’s going to be great whatever you do. I recommend mailing the tree to me;)

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View matt5's profile

matt5

82 posts in 2158 days


#12 posted 12-15-2011 07:19 PM

I’m confused. When I quartered the log (the white oak. The walnut was st. sawed) I had zero waste. Maybe I misspoke about what I did.
I cut the log into quarters, then alternated sawing each of the flat sides of the quarter piece. this left each plank with the quarter grain pattern one cut edge and the other edge with bark on it. I had just one little slab on each of the 4 quarters. almost no waste at all.
When I need the lumber I will edge it to the size I need.

-- I've cut it twice, but its still to short....

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matt5

82 posts in 2158 days


#13 posted 12-15-2011 07:28 PM

Oh, I forgot to mention the “rift” cut. (the first cut on each quarter that had the center of the log in it) I cut 5/4 for the stait treads, its absolutely beautiful stuff….

-- I've cut it twice, but its still to short....

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

13003 posts in 2160 days


#14 posted 12-15-2011 07:33 PM

I think below is a more accurate image of what happens in reality. Believe me, I could handle the waste on that big log. Cut the waste into pen blanks and give them to friends.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View matt5's profile

matt5

82 posts in 2158 days


#15 posted 12-15-2011 07:45 PM

Isn’t that a straight and a rift saw pattern? I am going to look for the diagram I used. give me a minute to find it.

-- I've cut it twice, but its still to short....

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