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anyone have experience with williams and hussey moulding planer?

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Forum topic by knotsofast posted 11-24-2017 01:43 AM 3360 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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knotsofast

28 posts in 1479 days


11-24-2017 01:43 AM

hello, I am looking for tips and advise on a williams and hussey moulding planer model w7. I just inherited it and I have never seen or used one before. while I am no novice to carpentry and shop tools I would like to know more about this machine before running it. it is an older machine that sat for a while, I have cleaned it up and lubed it everything seems to be in working order. I have looked for videos of people using them, but I really only see the newer versions ,but no explaination on how you set up guides to line up with moulding profiles. Also how can I tell if it is set up to run on 230v or 115v the main plug is missing, and the 2 hp motor states that it can be wired either way.


12 replies so far

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Richard Lee

56 posts in 608 days


#1 posted 11-24-2017 01:44 AM

http://www.owwm.org

Probably your best bet would be to post it here.

View runswithscissors's profile

runswithscissors

2557 posts in 1858 days


#2 posted 11-24-2017 06:22 AM

The motor should have a label, inside or out, with a diagram showing the optional ways to wire it. Once you know how it is currently wired, pick the appropriate plug, or re-wire it to your preferred voltage.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

View jar944's profile

jar944

113 posts in 1270 days


#3 posted 11-24-2017 12:58 PM

The new and older versions (as well as the shop fox clones) all function the same (and take the same knives)

All parts are still available from Williams and hussey.

Does it have powered feed? Powered infeed only or powered infeed and Outfeed were options depending on the age.

They are well regarded capable machines. If you have instagram check out chalkstonewoodworking. He has a few videos explaining the in’s and out’s of them. https://www.instagram.com/p/BWSaWi9BVK2/

I have 2 I acquired recently that I have yet to use myself

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knotsofast

28 posts in 1479 days


#4 posted 11-25-2017 12:52 PM

Runswith scissors, looks like it was wired for 230. So I put plug on. it ran 30 seconds and tripped house breaker I run Jointer on this plug with no issues

Jar944 my machine is like the one on the left it does have both rollers, but I haven’t been able to test yet

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jar944

113 posts in 1270 days


#5 posted 11-25-2017 02:08 PM

What do you plan on doing with the moulder?

The nice thing about w&h is that you can get any part from every model they made back to the 50s.

The first one I picked up (60s to 70s model) suffered some damage. I was able to call them up on a Monday morning and have all the replacement / upgraded parts sitting at my house four days later.

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

29085 posts in 2699 days


#6 posted 11-25-2017 02:44 PM

We got one to play around with. About a month later we set it aside to collect dust and got a real molder. It was a Weinig 5 head molder and knife grinder. You might say the William and Hussey started us into the molding business. We ended up with a molding plant with 5 Weinig molders. We ended up running molding for the next 25 years. The problem with that little molder was having to buy the tooling and the set up time. However, if you had something that you ran in small quantities that took maybe 4 or five knives it could be ok in a small shop. At the time we got that little molder we were running cabinets and leg tables in pretty good quantity. So we got the bigger molder which we could pay for most of the Weinig. Don’t get me wrong. If you came up with something that you could sell that took two or three profiles it could be real good. Good luck.

It’s been so long ago that we bought that little molder I just can’t remember all of the details about it. But we did run a couple of thousand feet of molding in that month that we used it. I’m sure that other people have used one to get into molding.

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

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knotsofast

28 posts in 1479 days


#7 posted 11-25-2017 06:47 PM

If I figure out wiring problem I’ll just use it in home work shop. The tool is very clean, as far can I can see wiring looks right, no sign of short…..but it trips my house breaker. I haven’t looked inside the motor, since I don’t know anything about what is in there. It came with 3 straight blades and 3 profiles.

View sawdustdad's profile

sawdustdad

333 posts in 718 days


#8 posted 11-26-2017 03:42 AM

If you are mistaken and it’s actually wired for 120v and you apply 240v, it will likely trip the breaker. Post the diagram on the motor and a photo of the wiring configuration.

-- Murphy's Carpentry Corollary #3: Half of all boards cut to a specific length will be too short.

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knotsofast

28 posts in 1479 days


#9 posted 11-26-2017 06:32 PM

I finally found the problem! I took apart each connection, cut back wire and reconnected, and while doing that I found the cable clamp on the motor had worn through wire insulation . Runs perfectly now.

So now….any tips on what kind of oil should go in gear box on side ? I just put 3in1 oil in so I could test run machine but it leaks terribly .

View jar944's profile

jar944

113 posts in 1270 days


#10 posted 11-26-2017 09:17 PM



I finally found the problem! I took apart each connection, cut back wire and reconnected, and while doing that I found the cable clamp on the motor had worn through wire insulation . Runs perfectly now. So now….any tips on what kind of oil should go in gear box on side ? I just put 3in1 oil in so I could test run machine but it leaks terribly .

- knotsofast

Your can order the oil directly from Williams and hussey. It calls for Gear Oil, 600XP 460.

View sawdustdad's profile

sawdustdad

333 posts in 718 days


#11 posted 11-27-2017 01:00 AM

That’s a neat tool. I have a Woodmaster planer/molder and it works the same way. I leave it permanently set up for molding. Nothing like being able to make your own walnut or cherry crown molding for a cabinet that needs a cornice. It’s surprising how well these machines do with a single knife. My Woodmaster’s knives have specific gibs for each knife as you need to keep the head balanced. Just need to keep them from getting mixed up!

-- Murphy's Carpentry Corollary #3: Half of all boards cut to a specific length will be too short.

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knotsofast

28 posts in 1479 days


#12 posted 11-27-2017 02:19 AM

How do you set it up to cut curved mouldings ?

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