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Paint for my son's bed

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Forum topic by optimusprimer92 posted 11-23-2017 07:04 PM 419 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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optimusprimer92

21 posts in 395 days


11-23-2017 07:04 PM

Hey all. I am in the process of building my son a bed. I am wanting to paint it. What do you all recommend for a clean and durable paint? I have used Benjamin Moore Advance Alkyd paint on some furniture before but it takes FOREVER to not smell completely toxic. Are there any other good options out there that will provide a solid and durable shell but also cure in a decent time?


18 replies so far

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Zestywalnut

13 posts in 138 days


#1 posted 11-24-2017 08:04 AM

I have the same dilemma. Hopefully someone here knows.

-- Become one with the wood.

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John

223 posts in 1414 days


#2 posted 11-24-2017 09:11 PM

I’ve used milk paint with a polycrylic topcoat for my kids furniture. Holds up well. I like the look of milk paint and the polycrylic protects it pretty well without changing the color at all.

-- I measured once, cut twice, and its still too short...

View jar944's profile

jar944

113 posts in 1270 days


#3 posted 11-24-2017 10:17 PM

Are you brushing or spraying?

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optimusprimer92

21 posts in 395 days


#4 posted 11-25-2017 04:09 PM

Most likely brushing/rolling

View Ripper70's profile

Ripper70

602 posts in 741 days


#5 posted 11-25-2017 06:42 PM

You may want to consider Sherwin Williams ProClassic Interior Waterbased Acrylic-Alkyd Enamel.

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo

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optimusprimer92

21 posts in 395 days


#6 posted 11-29-2017 05:54 PM

How does the SW smell after it dries? I used the BM water borne alkyd but it smelled awful for months. I need to be able to put it in my sons room without too much delay.

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AlaskaGuy

3625 posts in 2142 days


#7 posted 11-29-2017 06:12 PM

What is BM?

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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optimusprimer92

21 posts in 395 days


#8 posted 11-29-2017 06:12 PM

Benjamin Moore

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optimusprimer92

21 posts in 395 days


#9 posted 11-29-2017 06:14 PM



I ve used milk paint with a polycrylic topcoat for my kids furniture. Holds up well. I like the look of milk paint and the polycrylic protects it pretty well without changing the color at all.

- John

John, what brand milk paint and top coat did you use? I like the idea of a less chemical paint since my son will literally be sleeping in it for years.

View JADobson's profile

JADobson

918 posts in 1944 days


#10 posted 11-29-2017 06:28 PM

I’m using Old Fashioned Milk Paint from LV: http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.aspx?p=65208&cat=1,190,42942
I really like it. I’ve used it on a tool box and now on a letter tray and it seems to be holding up just fine.

-- No craft is very far from the line beyond which is magic. -- Lord Dunsany

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Ripper70

602 posts in 741 days


#11 posted 11-29-2017 08:06 PM



How does the SW smell after it dries? I used the BM water borne alkyd but it smelled awful for months. I need to be able to put it in my sons room without too much delay.

- optimusprimer92


Very little noticeable odor even when applying.

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo

View LittleShaver's profile

LittleShaver

198 posts in 452 days


#12 posted 11-29-2017 08:21 PM

Milk paint is forever, once it goes on it will never come off. Last summer I let my grand-daughters (ages 2 and 4) paint bird houses and a bench I had made to use up a batch of milk paint. I think we were scrubbing on those poor little girls for two days to get the paint off their skin.

I haven’t put a top coat on any milk paint I’ve ever used other than a coat of paste wax. I have a couple of dining room chairs that I painted a few years ago and they still look like the day they were first put into service.

You might try a water based poly if you really want a top coat.

-- Sawdust Maker

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John

223 posts in 1414 days


#13 posted 11-29-2017 10:07 PM

Old fashioned milk paint from woodcraft. I use a water based poly as a topcoat to make it more water resistant.

Milk paint does hold up very well but offers little to no protection from water. I like wax over milkpaint as well, but the girls can be hard on their furniture, and i don’t want to constantly rewax.

I have layered milk paint too. As it wears a second color is revealed and it looks great imo. If you go that route a topcoat other than wax isnt ideal.

The more I work with milkpaint the more I like it. I usually don’t add color to my furniture, except when management orders it that way.

Good luck on whichever you decide and be sure to post the finished product.

-- I measured once, cut twice, and its still too short...

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optimusprimer92

21 posts in 395 days


#14 posted 11-29-2017 10:54 PM

Anyone have experience with General Finish’s Milk Paint?

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01ntrain

205 posts in 903 days


#15 posted 11-29-2017 11:55 PM

From what I understand, it’s not very user-friendly.

I second the SW Pro Classic, you can either use the 100% acrylic(dark green can), or the hybrid alkyd(light green can), neither one has the same toxic smell as Advance. The drying time is better, too….

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