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Small Drawer "Stop" Design / Question / Suggestions

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Forum topic by Andybb posted 11-22-2017 05:17 PM 1141 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Andybb

552 posts in 442 days


11-22-2017 05:17 PM

Does any one know of a good technique or link to a good technique for drawer designs with “stops” for a jewelry box? I have done a few jewelry boxes recently but am trying to figure out the best way to incorporate stops for sliding drawers. What is your favorite drawer system for a small box that incorporates a stop to keep the drawers from falling out if pulled too far?

Thanks in advance.

-- Andybb - GO HAWKS!


10 replies so far

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dubois

36 posts in 1669 days


#1 posted 11-22-2017 06:30 PM

You know, the key to a really good drawer is making it glide smoothly over 3/4 of its length and then slowly tighten in its opening so that at full extension it self clamps side-to-side and takes some effort to remove it completely. It means at the back the drawer is fractionally larger then at the front, not requiring stops of any sort.

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Andybb

552 posts in 442 days


#2 posted 11-22-2017 06:46 PM



You know, the key to a really good drawer is making it glide smoothly over 3/4 of its length and then slowly tighten in its opening so that at full extension it self clamps side-to-side and takes some effort to remove it completely. It means at the back the drawer is fractionally larger then at the front, not requiring stops of any sort.

- dubois


Thanks. I’m assuming the drawer is square. What would be the technique you would use to make the back of the drawer larger?

-- Andybb - GO HAWKS!

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dubois

36 posts in 1669 days


#3 posted 11-22-2017 09:00 PM

The drawers I’m talking about and what I picture as drawers in a jewelry box are simple box-in-box or pocket drawers, in other words no mechanisms or runners or anything. I’m fitting individual drawer parts prior to assembly to the opening making sure the front just fits in place and the back of the drawer might hang in the opening but won’t pass through, nothing new here perhaps. Taking the step early on of, one way or the other, ensuring more space at the back of the pocket simplifies fitting. Once the drawer sides and front are all dovetailed and before the bottom is slid into its groove I plane it with the sharpest plane to the fit I am aiming at. The pre-fitting before assembly gets you well on your way and just normal cleaning up of the joinery should get you close. It really is a nice feeling to get the action on such a drawer, considering the hygroscopic nature of wood at all times, just right. Very easy to pass the sweet spot in a hurry so caution is called for.

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Rich

1984 posts in 427 days


#4 posted 11-22-2017 09:08 PM

That’s the method David Charlesworth teaches in his video Drawer Making & Fitting. You can download it for $45 from Lie-Nielsen.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

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Andybb

552 posts in 442 days


#5 posted 11-22-2017 10:29 PM



That s the method David Charlesworth teaches in his video Drawer Making & Fitting. You can download it for $45 from Lie-Nielsen.

- Rich


Thanks. I’m really just looking for a way to build drawers that include a stop that is easily adaptable to various designs.

-- Andybb - GO HAWKS!

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dubois

36 posts in 1669 days


#6 posted 11-23-2017 08:59 AM

I know nothing of this Charlesworth figure but in all fairness and for the record it is Krenov who popularized this method in The Fine Art of Cabinetmaking where he credits it as a criteria for judging the “master piece” of students who complete their formal cabinetmaking training in Sweden. So it isn’t something that can be attributed to an individual but is more an arbitrary standard established by tradition.

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splintergroup

1702 posts in 1060 days


#7 posted 11-23-2017 03:45 PM

A technique I have used is to cut the drawer sides about 1/4” lower then the face. The back piece is left full height.

Small blocks of wood (3/16” high) are attached to the top of the opening at the sides and act as stops as the drawer is pulled forward (they contact the drawers back panel.
To completely remove the drawer, the drawer is tipped up and out.

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cowboyup3371

18 posts in 36 days


#8 posted 11-24-2017 12:33 AM

Splinter’s would also work as a piece hanging down along the back far enough that it catches on the face as you pull it out. You’d have to leave enough room to angle it.

I did something similar for a dresser I built the wife years ago but the block is up front and hangs down from the top. It worked for what I did but I probably won’t do it that way again

-- Cowboy Up or Quit - If you are going to quit than get out of my way

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splintergroup

1702 posts in 1060 days


#9 posted 11-24-2017 03:35 PM

Cowboys suggestion is the traditional fix and simplest, if your jewelry box uses a face frame.
I often use a commercial metal tab on the rear of the drawer that flips out of the way for removal when there is a face frame present.

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