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table saw flatness

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Forum topic by toolanddieguy posted 02-24-2011 02:03 AM 1812 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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toolanddieguy

13 posts in 2155 days


02-24-2011 02:03 AM

How Flat should a new saw top be? Just got my new saw in and the table is out of flat .012 inch at the back of the table. There is a spot by the throat plate that is .014 low. It looks like when it was ground the table lifted of the chuck because the finish is very rough in this area.

I colored the top with a marker ,then rubbed it with a hone lightly to to highlight the low spots.

Am I being too picky, cause I,m not exactly thrilled with this? I’m a toolmaker by trade,and work with much tighter tolerances than this. Is this just toolmaker OCD?


6 replies so far

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Loren

8309 posts in 3113 days


#1 posted 02-24-2011 02:13 AM

Yeah, probably. Low spots aren’t as much a concern with table saws
as high spots.

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Ritty

63 posts in 2262 days


#2 posted 02-24-2011 02:46 AM

honestly how perfect do u expect man to be even if it was done by a machine man has to touch the work piece eventually. i wouldnt worry to much about it but if u can fix it and it makes you happy go ahead because after all thats what matters.

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knotscott

7216 posts in 2841 days


#3 posted 02-24-2011 02:52 AM

Your saw would have to be off by quite a bit for it to effect the cut. It’ll be a great day when my saw table is finally the reason I didn’t get the precision I needed! Honestly, I don’t even measure table flatness anymore. Just get it aligned, and check the cut….measure the table flatness only if your cuts are off for unknown reasons.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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toolanddieguy

13 posts in 2155 days


#4 posted 02-24-2011 03:00 AM

I frequently work with tolerances of .001 and sometimes down to .0005, so .012 seems huge to me. Guess that’s just a toolmakers train of thought. But you all are probably right its close enough.

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knotscott

7216 posts in 2841 days


#5 posted 02-24-2011 03:11 AM

Your wood will move more than that on any given day…. ;-)

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View offyguy's profile

offyguy

24 posts in 2156 days


#6 posted 02-24-2011 03:26 AM

(I frequently work with tolerances of .001 and sometimes down to .0005, so .012 seems huge to me.)

Welcome to woodworking!

I too come from the world of machining, I got into woodworking simply because you don’t need to be so precise (as in + or – a thou) and I thought it would be nice to have a “less stressful hobby”. You do need to be precise just not to the same extreme. I also like woodworking because it’s more about making one piece, then making the next piece fit, and then fitting the next piece, and so on. It’s less about making all the parts to print and assembling them (people try to do it this way, and usually end up disipointed).
But back to your saw, I guess my suggestion is how much did you pay for it? If it’s a low end machine (either contractor saw or cabinet saw), I’d say just live with it. But if it’s a high end saw, (contractor or cabinet saw) and you feel the saw should be better than it is, I’d call the company and ask for a replacement top.
You could always hand scrape it! Just kidding!

John

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