LumberJocks

Jewelry Box Hinges

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by ChefHDAN posted 02-24-2011 12:15 AM 7701 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View ChefHDAN's profile

ChefHDAN

809 posts in 2317 days


02-24-2011 12:15 AM

Topic tags/keywords: jewelry box

I see so many beautiful jewelry boxes here on LJ & am in the midst of building one myself. I’m searching for the right hinges and hope to get some experienced feedback on what many of you have found to work well.
I’ve made the box from gluing up a variety of scraps in the shop , (all stock is 1/2 thick),
The top is from the same scrap pile, I’ll cut it to size and “frame” it with a 1/4” cherry band.

I’ve looked at many from Brusso and they seem to be the best bet but expensive, I appreciate and info or experience you can share
Thanks!

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it


14 replies so far

View jmichaeldesign's profile

jmichaeldesign

66 posts in 2251 days


#1 posted 02-24-2011 02:51 AM

Spend the money for good hinges.

View cwdance1's profile

cwdance1

1158 posts in 2727 days


#2 posted 02-24-2011 04:15 AM

I am allong way from being an expert. With that said I realy like the looks of a barrel hinge. All the major online wood stores have them in differnt sizes. They can be hard to get alligned when drilling the holes for them. Make a templet and it should go just fine.

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

16244 posts in 3686 days


#3 posted 02-24-2011 05:52 AM

It really depends on the look you are going for. There are many different types. Good ones are expensive, but Lee Valley has a good supply of reasonably priced hinges.

Personally, I love the look of quadrant hinges, but they are not easy to install. Something that looks good and is not too difficult is a stopped piano hinge. They open just past 90 degrees to hold the lid open.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

14940 posts in 2158 days


#4 posted 02-24-2011 06:02 AM

Make your own wood hinges. They arent hard to make and look really cool. Laminate some scrap like youve done using very thin strips and I think they will really complement your box.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View Dave's profile

Dave

11405 posts in 2308 days


#5 posted 02-24-2011 06:56 AM

I agree with gfadvm

-- Superdav "No matter where you go - there you are." http://chiselandforge.com

View Dave's profile

Dave

11405 posts in 2308 days


#6 posted 02-24-2011 06:57 AM

Oh you box looks great to. i still agree with gfadvm

-- Superdav "No matter where you go - there you are." http://chiselandforge.com

View RogerBean's profile

RogerBean

1602 posts in 2421 days


#7 posted 02-24-2011 02:39 PM

Hinges are a top-line frustration for all box makers. Here’s my two cents worth. If cost is the primary criteria, brass butt hinges are available from Rockler, Woodcraft, Lee Valley for a couple bucks a pair. They work, and are easiest to install. If butt hinge with stop is desired Brusso is about the only choice. Rockler and others also offer a good looking quadrant hinge for about $6-8 that look and work fine, but are a stinker to install without skewing the lid alignment. Brusso quadrants are high quality, but have a rather “heavy” appearance that I personally do not prefer, and are pricy.

My preferred hinge is a side rail hinge either with integral stop or a quadrant stop which run $30-40 per pair. They are the easiest to install properly with two simple router table setups (quadrant type requires excavation for the quadrant). These are appropriate for the finest boxes and are available from Rockler, Woodcraft, and BCSpecialities.com. Andrew Crawford will (in the next month or two) be offering a side rail hinge (called the “SmartHinge”) which will probably be the best of the lot, but will also likely be costly. A smaller than full size router is the preferred tool for hinge installation. They can also be done by hand.

Wood hinges have a unique look that you may like. Hope this helps.
Roger

-- "Everybody makes mistakes. A craftsman always fixes them." (Monty Kennedy, "The Checkering and Carving of Gunstocks", 1952)

View Maveric777's profile

Maveric777

2692 posts in 2544 days


#8 posted 02-24-2011 03:00 PM

I’m going to ditto what Roger said. Quadrant hinges usually are my first go to, but I will readily admit. Although they give that little extra appeal they fight you tooth and nail getting them installed. I roughly average 3 to 4 hours just to install mine (I go the long way and hand chisel most of the mortise). I definitely have a love & hate relationship with them.

I will also touch on wood hinges. I love them! But….. Something you must think about is long term. I make integral stops in mine since I dislike stop chains on my boxes (no offence to folks who do… just not my preference). If I was going to make a box that is going to be used daily (jewelery box) I would most likely not go with wood. Reason being is I would be afraid of some sort of failure down the line. Maybe I’m being overly cautious, but better safe than sorry IMHO….

And one more thing…. Practice, practice, practice…. They do become easier as time goes by.

-- Dan ~ Texarkana, Tx.

View ChefHDAN's profile

ChefHDAN

809 posts in 2317 days


#9 posted 02-26-2011 02:51 PM

Allright wood hinges were not something I considered. Not really sure I can do them. Can anyone reccomend a tutorial site or somewhere I can at look at the concept? I’ve seen them done with the Incra jigs but now ya’ll have got me thinking about it and a hinge really isn’t too different from a box joint, and I can do that… hmmmnphf.. round over the edges figure how to do a pin … Help!

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

View rlrjr's profile

rlrjr

65 posts in 2307 days


#10 posted 02-26-2011 03:37 PM

Inca sells a set of router bits specifically for making wood hinges. They also make a metal jig called the “hinge crafter”. This holds the hinge so that the pin hole can be drilled accurately and it comes with a bit that is very long and can be used to drill from either side of the hinge if they are lengthy. I haven’t put them to use as yet but the videos on their web site make it look fairly easy for someone with wood working experience (which I do not have as yet) to make.

Just a thought…

-- When I works, I works hard. When I sits, I sits loose. And when I thinks I falls asleep.--

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

14940 posts in 2158 days


#11 posted 02-27-2011 07:05 AM

I cut my wood hinges with my shop made box joint jig.You dont want them to fit as tightly as for joinery so leave a tiny bit of gap.Also,cut the slots deeper.I overdrill my pin holes very slightly,use 1/8 brass rod for pins and sometimes hide the brass with 1/8 dowels.They seem to be very durable this way but I broke a lot of them before I loosened up my box joints and overdrilled the holes.Hope this is helpful.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View ChefHDAN's profile

ChefHDAN

809 posts in 2317 days


#12 posted 02-27-2011 03:38 PM

gfadvm, Many thanks, do you put a bullnose on the stock before running the slots and cut through a backer block? what about finishing??

rlrjr, I’m good & I’ve gotten away with it before, but my wife would slay me if I tried to justify $500 to get started with an Incra positioner system rather than buy a pair of $40 hinges…...

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

View SPalm's profile

SPalm

5257 posts in 3350 days


#13 posted 03-07-2011 12:25 AM

I just saw this post while surfing for hinges.

I made some wooden hinges and the wife unit has been using them on a box for two months now. They are still holding up. I still might be afraid of selling a box with them, but I am getting more confident.

I did a couple of project posts about making and drilling them. Just make a couple more than you need and then pick the best ones. Good wood and grain selection really helps a lot. You want quarter sawn type grain, where when you look at the wood from the end, the grain goes up and down, not side to side or smiley faces. This will keep it from chipping.

hinge:
http://lumberjocks.com/projects/36519
drill guide:
http://lumberjocks.com/projects/36746
Box using them:
http://lumberjocks.com/projects/41122

Steve

-- -- I'm no rocket surgeon

View Maveric777's profile

Maveric777

2692 posts in 2544 days


#14 posted 03-07-2011 06:00 AM

Let me add… If I made hinges as well as Steve does I would have much more confidence in them than I do mine. Just stating facts….

-- Dan ~ Texarkana, Tx.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com