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Forum topic by HRees posted 02-23-2011 09:20 AM 3856 views 0 times favorited 23 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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HRees

11 posts in 2119 days


02-23-2011 09:20 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question pine finishing

Hey,

I am making a credenza and it was supposed to be the “brown-black? color that many stores sell cheap furniture in.

Unfortunately, I made it our of pine and as you’d expect the staining turned out horrible. I used a wood conditioner and but on Minwax Ebony stain, figuring it would turn out light enough to be a brown black and not black.

Well, it turned out awful, pictured below. I got huge variances in colors and I would much rather like a mor consistent color.

Doors (After final coat of stain):

Here is the back of the credenza after the first coat (The last coat was just barely darker and evened it out just a touch)

I was thinking of putting on some Polyshades, or some sort of tinted lacquer? I doubt you guys are very proficient at fixing total screw ups, as you probably do it right, but let me know if you have any ideas for me. Thanks a lot.

-- Hoyt


23 replies so far

View Earlextech's profile

Earlextech

1159 posts in 2150 days


#1 posted 02-23-2011 03:59 PM

Hoyt,
I’m sure you don’t want to start all over and strip this project. So don’t use polyshades, yet, the urethane will seal the wood and you will have a harder time getting it darker. It appears that right now you only have stain on the wood. That’s good. The brown/black color you refer to in furniture stores is actually and solid color stain and what you used was a penetrating stain. You need something that will stay on the surface. You will still be able to see some of the grain but you have to go for black. At this point the brown background may help in creating the look you want.
Also, try to get away from the big box for your finishing supplies. It’s better to get this from a dedicated store where you can get some assistance. A woodworkers tool store, a paint store and cabinet materials suppliers are better places to get help when you need it.

-- Sam Hamory - The project is never finished until its "Finished"!

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dbray45

3178 posts in 2237 days


#2 posted 02-23-2011 04:03 PM

On a piece of scrap try the Minwax ebony with poly – oil based. I used this and it is a finish in itself, not a stain. It is almost a paint – and will chip but it makes the finish consistent.

When I used it – it took 2-3 coats to cover uniformly – and looks basically black when done.

-- David in Damascus, MD

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HRees

11 posts in 2119 days


#3 posted 02-23-2011 05:03 PM

Thank you for the suggestions. I think I’m going to go look for a gel stain. I was reading about the General Finishes gel stain. It seems they can be applied over a oil based stain, and they are going to stay on the surface instead of penetrate. I will stop by the Rockler/Toolstore near me tonight to see what they carry.

dbray45, Do you mean mix the ebony stain with polyurethane? Sounds like a homemade polyshade, haha. I will try it on a scrap.

Thanks.

-- Hoyt

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dbray45

3178 posts in 2237 days


#4 posted 02-23-2011 05:30 PM

No, this is available from Minwax

-- David in Damascus, MD

View FaTToaD's profile

FaTToaD

393 posts in 2601 days


#5 posted 02-23-2011 05:43 PM

I think the gel stain may be worth a try, hopefully on a scrap piece first. You could basically use it like a glaze. You may want to also try sealing the current stain with some dewaxed shellac then put the gel stain. Also, try this on a test board first. Good luck!

-- David

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Vicki

1042 posts in 2804 days


#6 posted 02-23-2011 08:43 PM

I had some problems with blotching on a small pine cabinet. I used minwax stain and minwax poly. Is there anything that can be put ON TOP to level the color so I don’t have to strip it all?

-- Vicki on the Eastern Shore of MD

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

16241 posts in 3678 days


#7 posted 02-23-2011 09:12 PM

Vicki: Once you apply poly, you have pretty much sealed the pores from accepting stain. You could use Minwax Polyshades, which is basically tinted poly, on top of your existing finish. I’m not a big fan of it normally, but it might be the next best alternative to sanding your cabinet down to bare wood.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

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dbray45

3178 posts in 2237 days


#8 posted 02-23-2011 09:25 PM

The oil based Polyshade was the product that I used. I am not a big fan of the product but it covers the problems.

-- David in Damascus, MD

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HRees

11 posts in 2119 days


#9 posted 02-24-2011 04:35 AM

So, I decided to go ahead and use a gel stain (General Finishes Gel Stain – Java). It help slighlty with the unevenness, but it definitely made it darker. I’d say I’m pleased after the first coat. Although it’s not dark nor even enough, I hope that subsequent coats will help with both. Here’s some pictures in case anyone else ever has this problem…

With 2 Coats of Minwax Ebony Oil Stain:

With 1 coat of the gel stain added:

Thanks for all of your help so far.

-- Hoyt

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Vicki

1042 posts in 2804 days


#10 posted 02-24-2011 04:55 AM

The Java is making it more even and appealing.

Thanks Charlie. I thought I saw Charles Neil put a gel stain over poly once. Guess I got confused. I might pic up some poly shades and give it a test.

-- Vicki on the Eastern Shore of MD

View Don's profile

Don

514 posts in 2533 days


#11 posted 02-24-2011 05:58 AM

You might want to try a dye rather than a stain. I’ve oly used dye once but it worked quite well at evening up colors and worked well on top of an oil based rub on poly finish.
I know it’s too late for this but a coat of dewaxed shellac as a sealer before staining would have prevented the blotchiness.

-- Don - I wood work if I could. Redmond WA.

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HRees

11 posts in 2119 days


#12 posted 02-24-2011 06:01 AM

I considered dyes. I figured there was even more to screw up there, so I decided to wait on that, ha.

Good information for the future. Although hopefully I won’t be working with Pine too much more.

-- Hoyt

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Vicki

1042 posts in 2804 days


#13 posted 02-24-2011 06:58 AM

Thanks Don. I used Helmsman. Do you think dye would still work? Can you get it at the box stores?

-- Vicki on the Eastern Shore of MD

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Don

514 posts in 2533 days


#14 posted 02-24-2011 09:13 AM

Hoyt, I think that dyes are easier to work with than stain. Also, Pine is probobly the worst wood when it comes to blotchyness but Cherry and Alder and I’m sure others that I’m not familiar with can be nearly as bad.

Vivki, I haven’t seen wood dyes at the box stores. I get it from Woodcraft.

-- Don - I wood work if I could. Redmond WA.

View dbray45's profile

dbray45

3178 posts in 2237 days


#15 posted 02-24-2011 02:43 PM

And my wife wonders why I have piles of scrap – just for things like this

-- David in Damascus, MD

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