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24" diameter wood Stonehenge ring

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Forum topic by willhime posted 11-19-2017 08:15 PM 392 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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willhime

99 posts in 1377 days


11-19-2017 08:15 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question resource tip trick router shaping joining sanding veneering

I need to make a ring that’s .75”x.75”x24” for the top of a Stonehenge model I’ve been tasked to make. It’s supposed to be nice wood so now I’m stuck. I don’t want to glue up a large panel just to route out that small dimension. I thought about doing the opposing picture frame stacked method where you make a 4 sided frame, then make an identical one and stack, glue and clamp them together to look like an 8-sided David star but then you’d see the segments on the edge grain. The same would happen if I steam bent thin pieces and glued them up but from the top view. Is my only option to make the segment method and veneer wrap the edges ?

-- Burn your fire for no witness


6 replies so far

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jmos

797 posts in 2208 days


#1 posted 11-19-2017 09:58 PM

Why can’t you steam bend a single piece. Then you would only have one seam. I’m no steam bending expert, but I don’t think 3/4” is too thick.

If you laminate thin layers, you probably wouldn’t need to steam them on a 24” diameter.

-- John

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Lazyman

1506 posts in 1226 days


#2 posted 11-19-2017 10:27 PM

You are going to have waste no matter what but you could easily make the ring from 12 1” wide strips of 3/4” thick wood with mitered ends . The ends would be mitered 15 degrees on each end (360 / 12 / 2). A spline of the same or even a contrasting wood would add strength to the end grain joints and still look pretty nice. By my quick and dirty Sketchup drawing, they would be 5 7/8” long on the short side and 6 1/2” on the long side (but double check me on that). Once you have them glued up it would be a simple matter of cutting the inside and outside diameters.

Edit: You could actually cut the strips into arcs before you glue them up to avoid cutting 2 large circles but then you have to get the dimensions exactly right. Doing it afterwards, gives you a about a 1/4” of leaway.

Edit #2: Note that my length and width assumptions are based upon a 24” outer diameter and a 22 1/4” inner diameter of the ring. If the 24” is the inner diameter, the segments would need to be longer than I computed and maybe wider than 1 inch.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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Lazyman

1506 posts in 1226 days


#3 posted 11-19-2017 10:58 PM

In my limited steam bending experience, bending an approximately 72” strip of 3/4” would not be something I want to try, especially with a nice piece of wood. You only have a short time to get it clamped into place before it starts to stiffen up. Also, you really need air dried wood to steam bend wood because kiln drying sets the lignin and makes it hard to bend more than just a little without splitting. The species of wood also makes a big difference. You will get spring back with steam bending so you have to do something to connect the ends to hold them in place and the final size may be a little harder to get exact. Probably not the sort of project I would want to try with my first attempt at steam bending anyway.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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jmos

797 posts in 2208 days


#4 posted 11-20-2017 01:34 AM

Steam bend 4 pieces to 1/4 circle each – 1 form, 4 times, 4 seams. each piece about 20” long.

-- John

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Loren

9632 posts in 3486 days


#5 posted 11-20-2017 02:16 AM

You’ll have glue lines laminating it but doing
it that way will involve less time and expense
compared to steam bending a thicker piece.
I could steam bend that hoop in one piece
but I would need to build a longer steam
box and make a form. I already have the
other equipment but it would still entail several
hours of getting set up to bend the part.

Solid wood pieces up to about 1/4” thick can
be bent to a 12” radius without a backing strap
by steaming or sluicing in boiling water. Expect
more failures with 1/4” stock compared to 1/8”.

Oak bends very well. Even kiln dried it can be
bent to a 12” radius without a lot of failures
with a backing strap.

To explore the feasibility cut a 24” plywood circle
with a notch in it for the end. Screw the disc
to something heavy that you can walk all the way
around. Cut a 1/4” strip, pour boiling water
on it and give it a try. It will probably break, in
which case you’ll try again the same way, use
a thinner piece and/or try a steam method.

A piece of 2” PVC pipe with a cap on one end
positioned vertically over the spout of an electric
teapot should work adequately as a steamer.

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