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Answer to hand hewn look

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Forum topic by richardchaos posted 11-19-2017 05:53 PM 445 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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richardchaos

517 posts in 212 days


11-19-2017 05:53 PM

I have always wanted to ad a hand-hewn effect to table tops without doing the work.

I have seen where some used a GRINDER but it always leaves a cross grain effect where you could tell it was a grinder.

Stumbled upon this tech, tool and blade from Festool to do just that….

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1uIgoOEtCSU

-- “In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act.” ― George Orwell


8 replies so far

View mtnwalton's profile

mtnwalton

16 posts in 858 days


#1 posted 11-21-2017 05:55 AM

I bought one of their planers and scallop knives to do just that several years ago on a pair of 7’ x 11’ gates out of cedar for a video production. Worked well but a bearing started going out near the end.

The gates were over a foot thick and paneled with cedar on both sides. Carcass was made from foam to maintain the shape and no sagging. Pivot hinges on top and bottom of heavy steel with 1 1/2” solid steel rod. We glued cedar to all edges and faces.

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richardchaos

517 posts in 212 days


#2 posted 11-21-2017 12:45 PM



HOW cool is that

I bought one of their planers and scallop knives to do just that several years ago on a pair of 7 x 11 gates out of cedar for a video production. Worked well but a bearing started going out near the end.

The gates were over a foot thick and paneled with cedar on both sides. Carcass was made from foam to maintain the shape and no sagging. Pivot hinges on top and bottom of heavy steel with 1 1/2” solid steel rod. We glued cedar to all edges and faces.

- mtnwalton


-- “In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act.” ― George Orwell

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

1493 posts in 1220 days


#3 posted 11-21-2017 01:24 PM

Looking at the resulting surface at the end of the video, I am not impressed. It doesn’t really look like what I would call rough hewn. In fact it looks like someone didn’t know how to setup a power planer and randomly gouged their board with it over and over. It might have looked better had he tried to keep the planer oriented in the same direction to simulate what you do when you actually rough out a board with an adz and draw knife. You usually start at one end and work your way towards the other keeping your tool in approximately the same orientation the whole way.

I think it would be better and about $600 cheaper to use a grinder with a flap disk. If you use a higher grit, you’ll get fewer cross grain scratches than with a regular grinding disk..

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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richardchaos

517 posts in 212 days


#4 posted 11-21-2017 02:39 PM

Yea I agree.. It doesn’t have long drawn out patterns like a Pull Knife would make but it dos look like an Axe sort to surfacing.

I have seen many time people trying to get that long pull knife looking draw look. Everyone else uses a Grinder or disc sander that leaves crosshatch marks you really can get out that are in the center down deep.

SO I guess you got to use a draw knife!

AS for as some sort of POWER way to do it I think what you would need is some sort of BENCH PLANNER where the parts that shape the valleys goes up and down a little and side to side just a touch to pull it off. MAN now we are talking money!


Looking at the resulting surface at the end of the video, I am not impressed. It doesn t really look like what I would call rough hewn. In fact it looks like someone didn t know how to setup a power planer and randomly gouged their board with it over and over. It might have looked better had he tried to keep the planer oriented in the same direction to simulate what you do when you actually rough out a board with an adz and draw knife. You usually start at one end and work your way towards the other keeping your tool in approximately the same orientation the whole way.

I think it would be better and about $600 cheaper to use a grinder with a flap disk. If you use a higher grit, you ll get fewer cross grain scratches than with a regular grinding disk..

- Lazyman

-- “In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act.” ― George Orwell

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Lazyman

1493 posts in 1220 days


#5 posted 11-21-2017 05:18 PM

Have you ever tried with a flap disk on the grinder? I’ve seen that used to carve out or at least finish the carve out of a hand hewn bowl and it seems to leave a fairly smooth finish. In fact, I just bought a 120 grit disk at HF a few days ago with the intent of giving that a try. If I do that any time soon I will try to remember to report back my results.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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Loren

9602 posts in 3480 days


#6 posted 11-21-2017 05:27 PM

I have one of those planers. I haven’t used
it enough to comment on technique though.

It doesn’t tear-out the way an adze would and
it gives you a texture to offer clients.

There’s chain saw attachment called a Log Wizard
that’s like a planer blade. It can do a variety of
texturing cuts I think.

View TheTurtleCarpenter's profile

TheTurtleCarpenter

988 posts in 898 days


#7 posted 11-22-2017 02:32 AM

LV sells additional scalloped blades for their scrub plane for hewn texture. The blades could be purchased and used in an old coffin smoother or you could take a spare blade from a Stanley or such, and fashion it up with a disc grinder. I have used cambered blades before and lowered the corner down for texture.

-- "Tying shoelaces was way harder than learning to Whistle",,,,,member MWTCA area K. Kentucky

View Kirk650's profile

Kirk650

513 posts in 581 days


#8 posted 11-22-2017 03:28 AM

Scrub plane? That might work.

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