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Forum topic by Carloz posted 11-19-2017 04:41 PM 1292 views 0 times favorited 25 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Carloz

954 posts in 424 days


11-19-2017 04:41 PM

Every other post here is an attempt to somehow move ones hobby to business. Unfortunately hay days of woodworking (as well as any other manual labor) are long gone. It takes years to master tecnique and thousands in equipment to make acceptable furniture for example and you harly be above minimal wage. At the same time a retired lady takes 2 days real estate course, sell one house a year and still will make more than you doing hard labor everyday all year long.
Let the hobby stay where it is and make money trading stocks.


25 replies so far

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

3625 posts in 2142 days


#1 posted 11-19-2017 08:33 PM

Two day’s?????

How do u get a real estate license?

Requirements to Obtain Your California Salesperson License.
Must be at least 18 years of age.
Register for and complete 135 hours of required education.
Apply for your Salesperson Exam/License Application, including fingerprinting and background check.
Take the California Salesperson License Exam.

Sometimes I worry about you.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View richardchaos's profile

richardchaos

517 posts in 212 days


#2 posted 11-19-2017 09:07 PM

I am afraid you are correct. To make any money that you can live on doing this I have found a couple of things you need in your life.. You have to live in or near a big city… You have to be injected into peoples lives that have the money and the appreciation of fine things.

They have been saying for decades it doesn’t mater where you are the Internet is erasing geographic issue… IN MY ARSE!

One of my neighbors where I lived in to Artist community was best friends with The Guy that started ran owned DELL COMPUTERS in Austin Texas. Mike Dell. Back in those days, The Bill Clinton dye EVERYONE was fat! Everyone had money. And HE Poured money of my friend Dick Hedgepath. Those day are over.

I have no answers. You can make some money doing this hobby but don’t quit your day job.

ALSO I have no idea how some of these woodworkers affairs CNC machines


Every other post here is an attempt to somehow move ones hobby to business. Unfortunately hay days of woodworking (as well as any other manual labor) are long gone. It takes years to master tecnique and thousands in equipment to make acceptable furniture for example and you harly be above minimal wage. At the same time a retired lady takes 2 days real estate course, sell one house a year and still will make more than you doing hard labor everyday all year long.
Let the hobby stay where it is and make money trading stocks.

- Carloz

-- “In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act.” ― George Orwell

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Kelly

1821 posts in 2777 days


#3 posted 11-20-2017 05:08 PM

That damn box has destroyed many a woodworking career.

I left it (the box) years ago and managed to eek out a better than decent living from it. I have zero doubt I could do even better in this day and age.

My key to success was abandoning the all-or-nothing attitude and approach. Instead, I became willing to step outside the shop and look at bigger pictures, like fence and deck maintenance and repair. Hey, it’s still woodwork, just a different kind of “glamor.”

Doing those things, I took different approaches that most. For example, I shared every secret I had with my customers. Only one in three hundred would use any of them. The information would, often, inundate the customer and all they’d remember is, “that guy knows a lot about woodwork AND taking care of it after it’s built. In the end, if their fence or deck looked and held up better, I looked better.

While I was working a deck or fence, I took advantage of opportunities. If pressure washing a deck, I pointed out that fence could be cleaned too, and applications of non-hardening oils would help reduce shrinking that caused splitting and cracking, in addition to giving the gray wood a gold tone.
to push nicer railing or whatever.

If I was applying the oil to the fence, I would explain my home made formula and how it could be applied with a simple garden sprayer, if it was thinned.

In the course of conversations, the matter of a broken baluster or a look chair rung often came up, and I made it clear I was willing to do repairs.

People presume much from just a little information. To many, that I was able to make a cabinet meant I must be able to frame a shed or whatever. If I was up to the task, I’d do it.

Of course, there were always those “can you fix my door,” “redo my cabinets and so on.

I kept busy enough I was able to say no to my “I hate to do that” jobs, like roofing and concrete. However, if I was hungry, I did do a small patch or two. In the end, one thing leads to another and I became more and more able to cherry pick my jobs.

Too, and this is HUGE, I got to buy a LOT of nice toys. Today, I have a nice cabinet saw, band saw, over-arm router, carver, edge, spindle and other sanders and so on. I can route and polish an edge on a round I made for a planter stand, glass etch a door window, repair a stained or leaded glass lamp, turn a leg [or what have you].

In general, I do not suffer from boredom.

The pictures are of a farm house. The guy wanted new cabinets. I explained that his fairly stout plywood beasts could be made beautiful. I ran oak through the bandsaw to make new 3/8” thick rails and styles to lay over the existing ones, added end panels, then “threw on matching doors.”

Doing the job gave me an opportunity to to get creative and solve problems. His huge fridge cabinet has a 30” lazy Susan. The Soffit over the stove opens and can hide a favorite musket, for example. In the end, that one job gave me several more over the years.


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PPK

862 posts in 642 days


#4 posted 11-20-2017 05:33 PM



Every other post here is an attempt to somehow move ones hobby to business. Unfortunately hay days of woodworking (as well as any other manual labor) are long gone. It takes years to master tecnique and thousands in equipment to make acceptable furniture for example and you harly be above minimal wage. At the same time a retired lady takes 2 days real estate course, sell one house a year and still will make more than you doing hard labor everyday all year long.
Let the hobby stay where it is and make money trading stocks.

- Carloz

The way you said that could incite people to get a little defensive…

I agree to some point, but at the same time, I completely disagree. Any line of work takes a lot of WORK to get good at, and consistently make good returns… And further, there’s the whole bit about doing something that you love/enjoy. It aint all about makin money! If you make enough to support yourself/your family, then the next thing is… well, check out the good ‘ol Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs…

-- Pete

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Puzzleman

416 posts in 2777 days


#5 posted 11-22-2017 12:25 PM

I started out as a hobby in my basement. Enjoyed doing the work and making small sales at local craft shows.

Then the company I was working for was going to go out of business.
So I took the plunge into making puzzles full time.
was it easy? NO
Was it fun 100% of the time? NO
Did I get a paycheck for the first 3 years? NO

I did have grit and determination and a willingness to learn sales, business and more woodworking from others that wanted to help me succeed. I had to pivot many a time and do many different things to keep the dream alive of being my own boss. I have a background in production management through the jobs that I had, so maybe that helped me succeed.

Now it is 15 years later and I have a small company that has 10 full time and 4 part-time employees.
All of this from making puzzles.

In any business, there are a number of them that didn’t make it. All we hear about is the winners who survived and became big businesses. Don’t hear as much about the ones who didn’t succeed but went a different direction and then eventually succeeded or never was able to do it.

Running your own business takes a lot of different hats. You have to not only make high-quality product, you have to do it efficiently to keep costs done, you have to market and be a salesperson to keep sales up, you have to understand and be able to keep up with cash flow so you have money, you have to go down a lot of paths that do not always work out and you have to do all this at the same time.

Going full time is not for everyone. Not everyone is going to make it.
Just because you couldn’t be successful, don’t discourage others.
Don’t be a person who tears things down but rather is a cheerleader for those who want to try.
If someone wants to try, let them. Help them learn from your experience so they don’t have to take so many wrong turns but most of all, be encouraging. It is a scary decision to make and it is full of challenges. Don’t tear someone’s dream apart because it didn’t work for you. Different people do things differently.

Maybe part of my problem is that I am a glass half full type of person. I refuse to tell people that they can’t do things that may help them improve their lot in life. I try to help by talking with them about my experiences and hopefully they can use that to help them in their endeavors.

Apologize for the length but this is a sensitive topic for me.

-- Jim Beachler, Chief Puzzler, http://www.hollowwoodworks.com

View Gilley23's profile

Gilley23

374 posts in 215 days


#6 posted 11-22-2017 01:28 PM


Going full time is not for everyone. Not everyone is going to make it.
Just because you couldn t be successful, don t discourage others.
Don t be a person who tears things down but rather is a cheerleader for those who want to try.
If someone wants to try, let them. Help them learn from your experience so they don t have to take so many wrong turns but most of all, be encouraging. It is a scary decision to make and it is full of challenges. Don t tear someone s dream apart because it didn t work for you. Different people do things differently.

Maybe part of my problem is that I am a glass half full type of person. I refuse to tell people that they can t do things that may help them improve their lot in life. I try to help by talking with them about my experiences and hopefully they can use that to help them in their endeavors.

Apologize for the length but this is a sensitive topic for me.

- Puzzleman

Perfectly said, Sir. Thank you for taking the time to do so. Your attitude is what separates the winners from the losers.

View Tennessee's profile

Tennessee

2587 posts in 2347 days


#7 posted 11-22-2017 01:39 PM

When I started making guitars in 2008, I pretty much stunk up the place. Eleven guitars in, I sold my first one.
Long story short, by 2013 making guitars as fast as I could, I had not one, but two people ask me that year if I was interested in having them market them for me, lending me the money to go full time, and hit the big leagues in making a firm set of styles and selling guitars.
I politely declined both, since I always wanted it to stay part-time.
But, if you are good enough, and have enough stamina to keep at it, pay your dues, so to speak, you can make a living at woodworking. Just ask Greg Klassen, the fellow who makes the river tables that sell for thousands of dollars, or Puzzleman, who is obviously successful.

There are a lot of these types out there, plus, to be honest, good craftspeople are disappearing and in great demand. Ever try to get a decent plumber, electrician, or finish carpenter?

-- Tsunami Guitars and Custom Woodworking, Cleveland, TN

View Rich's profile (online now)

Rich

1970 posts in 422 days


#8 posted 11-22-2017 03:31 PM


Every other post here is an attempt to somehow move ones hobby to business. Unfortunately hay days of woodworking (as well as any other manual labor) are long gone. It takes years to master tecnique and thousands in equipment to make acceptable furniture for example and you harly be above minimal wage. At the same time a retired lady takes 2 days real estate course, sell one house a year and still will make more than you doing hard labor everyday all year long.
Let the hobby stay where it is and make money trading stocks.

- Carloz

Do you ever say anything that’s positive?

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

View rbrjr1's profile

rbrjr1

91 posts in 38 days


#9 posted 11-22-2017 04:02 PM

lol.
I work with wood because I love it and it saves me from hiring the people you’re talking about (those who do this for a living).

I don’t really see it the same way you do, but I’m generally happy and enjoy my life.

-- measure twice, cut once.

View DS's profile

DS

2819 posts in 2253 days


#10 posted 11-22-2017 04:05 PM

There’s nothing like being involuntarily self-employed (read unemployed) to motivate one to turn a hobby into a profession. It worked for me during the last downturn in the economy. I not only eked out a decent living, but, increased my income by almost double for 11 months that year before finding the job I was looking for.

Aside from working myself senseless, the main downside is that my hobby wasn’t nearly as enjoyable for a while after that.

You have to make decisions based on your business objectives which takes a bit more thinking and will power to work smarter rather than harder. Outsourcing was my good friend during that time and I was able to put out a considerably higher volume of products than I could’ve imagined if I were doing everything by myself in my garage. That was very necessary since I was quite accustomed to a steady ration of food to eat each day along with a roof over my head.

I must confess, that my history making a living in woodworking made this transition fairly painless for me. If it were twenty or thirty years earlier, I likely would’ve struggled to make a go of it. There is something to be said for experience and lessons learned the hard way. I already had a good reputation among my clients which was extremely helpful landing projects.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

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CharlesNeil

2140 posts in 3703 days


#11 posted 11-22-2017 04:15 PM

Woodworking has treated me well,
One important lesson, learned early on was marketing not only your products but yourself .is essential. Clients who are willing to pay well for products want them made ” by someone” with a name.
Many hobbyist are excellent woodworkers, but no one knows them,.For every hour you spend in the shop , you need to spend at least 1/2 of that , doing shows and whatever you can do to get your name out in front of people , its not easy and takes a lot of time and effort .

Reputation and word of mouth are key .

View diverlloyd's profile

diverlloyd

2327 posts in 1690 days


#12 posted 11-22-2017 04:42 PM


Every other post here is an attempt to somehow move ones hobby to business. Unfortunately hay days of woodworking (as well as any other manual labor) are long gone. It takes years to master tecnique and thousands in equipment to make acceptable furniture for example and you harly be above minimal wage. At the same time a retired lady takes 2 days real estate course, sell one house a year and still will make more than you doing hard labor everyday all year long.
Let the hobby stay where it is and make money trading stocks.

- Carloz

Do you ever say anything that s positive?

- Rich

Nope

View richardchaos's profile

richardchaos

517 posts in 212 days


#13 posted 11-22-2017 05:21 PM

It cant be done… sort of like this…

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FqvBLQfTaB4

-- “In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act.” ― George Orwell

View HowardInToronto's profile

HowardInToronto

72 posts in 1535 days


#14 posted 11-23-2017 03:55 AM

Interesting thread.

Lots of valuable info here.

I think Jim Puzzleman nailed it with his most important observation – ”.... Just because you couldn’t be successful, don’t discourage others….. Don’t tear someone’s dream apart because it didn’t work for you.”

I feel the OP’s argument has a lot of holes in it.

Don’t assume every woodworker is a furniture maker. Just ask Jim Puzzleman. Or maybe check in with the canoe and kayak makers, the luthiers, the chairmakers and the stair makers….

The remark about a retired lady selling one house a year seemed kind of insulting. Are you suggesting she only sells one house a year because that’s all she cares to do? That doesn’t sound right. Because there’s lots of hard frustrating work and plenty to learn in any new business – regardless of anybody’s motivation. And, quite frankly, I’d think selling one house after the first year is probably a massive victory.

Also, I’m not so sure the hay days of this “manual labour” are gone. Maybe you should ask some of the pros who’ve been in this business for a few decades and are doing just fine – regardless of economic climate. They took the time to do the right things well. Just ask Charles Neil.

You seem to think only in terms of dollars and cents. That’s fine. Everybody has the right to think their own way. But if everyone worked only for the dollars, we’d all be plastic surgeons in Hollywood.

Why SHOULDN’T somebody take a chance on themselves doing a skill they love and learn how to manage it as a job. Where’s the value in staying at what might be a soul-killing job whose only saving grace is that it provides a paycheque?

Please DO NOT get me wrong – I’m not suggesting jumping off the dock straightaway. As long as somebody does have the firm footing of a job beneath them, there’s a lot of value in starting part-time, small and acquiring skills with the option of scaling up if that’s what they care to do as time, energy and interest permit.

My Pa used to say that it’s better to light a candle than curse the darkness.

Howard

View Monte Pittman's profile

Monte Pittman

27035 posts in 2171 days


#15 posted 11-23-2017 04:05 AM

1+ what Charles said

-- Mother Nature created it, I just assemble it.

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