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Forum topic by Jeff82780 posted 02-22-2011 08:52 PM 1372 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Jeff82780

204 posts in 2461 days


02-22-2011 08:52 PM

Hello everyone. I’m still having a real diifficult time with my jointer and have nobody to properly show me what I’m doing wrong. I’VE watched countless videos and read articles and still am not getting this down.It is so frustrating!


16 replies so far

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DLCW

530 posts in 2121 days


#1 posted 02-23-2011 03:25 AM

What specifically seems to be the problem?

-- Don, Diamond Lake Custom Woodworks - http://www.dlwoodworks.com - "If you make something idiot proof, all they do is make a better idiot"

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Resurrected

671 posts in 2159 days


#2 posted 02-23-2011 03:30 AM

You forgot something. What is the problem. I’m down by Marysville.

-- Who can I block now???????????????????????

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ClayandNancy

511 posts in 2482 days


#3 posted 02-23-2011 03:32 AM

Nice to know there’s LumberJocks near Cleveland, I’m in Chardon but sorry not really experienced with a jointer.

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Jeff82780

204 posts in 2461 days


#4 posted 02-23-2011 08:50 PM

I am have problem with everything. Everytime I run the board through, It never is nice flat and square. Also am getting a whole bunch of machine marks and I am using brand new blades. I am also having a hard time setting the knives correctly.

View Brian's profile

Brian

6 posts in 2554 days


#5 posted 02-24-2011 03:52 AM

I am in Jefferson. If your blades are not set correctly, you will never get it to cut right. It took me about 4 hours the first time.

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Resurrected

671 posts in 2159 days


#6 posted 02-24-2011 04:47 AM

Yeap blades can be a tedious chore. Did you nick the blade by chance?

Need a good small square.

And a straight edge for the rest

-- Who can I block now???????????????????????

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Nomad62

726 posts in 2425 days


#7 posted 02-24-2011 07:05 PM

Brand new blades are brand new but are still subject to manufacturers specs, nicks, and such in their travels. I would recommend getting them resharpened, then develop a means to get them installed correctly. Some people use magnets, others a level and square. Jointers are incredibly dangerous, and the care (as much of a p.i.t.a. that it is) to get it all right is worth the time; also the tool will be your greatest friend once it is right. Good luck.

-- Power tools put us ahead of the monkeys

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dbray45

3187 posts in 2243 days


#8 posted 02-24-2011 08:02 PM

Sounds like you have one of the blades at a slight angle or a table. Remove both blades, clean everything with a toothbrush and then blow air to remove any and all particles. Set your table to 0 “zero” and place a straight edge or metal level across the feed tables. You need to check these across the front, across the back, and corner to corner. Adjust so that they are totally flat across the top Then put your blades back and check level again at zero. With the straight edge across the feeds, hand turn the blades, they should not, at zero, lift the straight edge off the table – just tuoch the edge – at all angles and for all blades. This is a royal pain for spiral blades where you have 90+ inserts.

When you are done, square the fence to the table on both sides of the blade slot and the ends. If everything is flat and the fence is straight it will square up.

Now it is time to run a piece of scrap through the machine. I use a 2×4 and run the 4” side and flatten, then put the newly flattened side against the fence and square the edge. Test the edges and surfaces for flat and square. If you did it right, all will be good, if you get grooves or scollops in the surface, one of the blades is not in right, If there is a raised groove, you have a nick in a blade. The surfaces should be almost reflective from being so smooth.

-- David in Damascus, MD

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Jeff82780

204 posts in 2461 days


#9 posted 02-26-2011 03:53 AM

took my jointer knves in yesterday to have them sharpened. They will be ready tomorrow, so I will let you giuys know how this turns out.

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Jeff82780

204 posts in 2461 days


#10 posted 02-27-2011 04:15 AM

today i put my newly sharpened jointer knives to the test and I am getting more tearout than ever and I am jointing with the grain, not to mention a bunch of machine marks still. Also, My boards are still not coming out straight and square, They are a little concave. Anybody have any ideas? Here are some pictures. Its hard to see all of the machine markings from the knives, but the tearout is easily seen.Hope you can see.

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Resurrected

671 posts in 2159 days


#11 posted 02-27-2011 05:58 AM

Curious how much are you taken off in a single pass. 1/32 1/16 etc. To much will cause what I see if thats pine thats soft and with bigger cuts more tear out is likely.

I’m not a expert though.

-- Who can I block now???????????????????????

View fussy's profile

fussy

980 posts in 2518 days


#12 posted 02-27-2011 07:12 AM

Jeff,

Resurrected has the right idea. Several things to consider: Too heavy a cut will cause tear-out; the worst you see in the pic is around a knot—reversing grain is unavoidable so ease up on the depth of cut (you already should have anyway); the proper sequence is joint a face, then making sure that the face is firmly against the fence (making sure the fence is 90* to the table) joint an edge. If you get tear out on the edge, and the depth of cut is light, flip end for end and joint in the other direction. To tell the grain direction on rough lumber, stroke it with your fingertips; the right way will feel smoother than the wrong way—exactly the same as stroking a cat (or dog if you prefer). Also remember, a jointer is not supposed to give you a FINISHED SURFACE; only a FLAT one and one edge square to it. It cannot give you a paralell surface. A planer does that. Don’t expect too much of your jointer. Neither it nor a planer are finishing tools; together they only get the wood flat, square, and faces parallel. You still have to sand and scrape, etc.

Also, don’t try to joint long pieces. Determine what’s going to come out of each board, cut it out with a jig saw or whatever (leaving it a little big in all directions), mark it and joint. You’ll make fewer shavings jointing a 4 ft board thAN a 10 ft board, and you’ll have more lumber left.

Mostly, relax, think your way through, and don’t try adjusting things until you have 1) eliminated operator error, and 2) made sure you fully understand your machine. A jointer is not rocket science, but it can be easier sometimes to dock with the space station than to correct setup errors. I sincerely hope this helps. I, as most of the others here, have been exactly where you are, and we share your pain.

Steve

-- Steve in KY. 44 years so far with my lovely bride. Think I'll keep her.

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Jeff82780

204 posts in 2461 days


#13 posted 02-27-2011 11:38 PM

OK, today i took the freshly sharpened blades out and put in a set of older knives that actually have only been used a few times. Much better results. I am still getting some machine marks, but no tear out . But like you guys were saying that i need to expect some marks, a jointer is not a finishing tool. So now since I have the tearout issue hopefully solved. How do I know if the face and egde i joint are square? Is there a trick or technique i could use to dtermine this? Thanks everyone!

-Jeff

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fussy

980 posts in 2518 days


#14 posted 02-28-2011 12:45 AM

Jeff,

Glad to hear you’re making progress. I would attribute your success to growing facility with changing/adjusting jointer blades; not an easy task! As to your last question, simply use a good try=square to make sure your jointed face and edge are square to one another. If your fence is square to the table, and you hold the work piece firmly to the fence, it will be square. Any varience will be revealed by the try square. Once again, make SURE the fence is square to the table. The strait edge of the square will show that the piece is flat. Keep in mind that the piece does not have to be PERFECTLY flat at this point; only flat enough to keep it from rocking as you plane it. Once you’ve planed the second side parallel flip and plane the first side striving to remove roughly equal amounts of material from each side. Then when satisfied, use the jointed edge against the fene of your saw, rip to width. Some leave 1/32” or so extra and joint to final width. I only do that if ripping on the bandsaw. My tablesaw leaves a pretty clean edge and I’ve not had a failure in 40 years. Have fun, and best of luck.

Steeve

-- Steve in KY. 44 years so far with my lovely bride. Think I'll keep her.

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dbray45

3187 posts in 2243 days


#15 posted 02-28-2011 02:23 PM

Could be that the sharpened blades are at the wrong angle.

-- David in Damascus, MD

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