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Forum topic by buckbuster31 posted 11-17-2017 03:15 PM 570 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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buckbuster31

203 posts in 354 days


11-17-2017 03:15 PM

ok, I need help with a suggestion. I do a lot of large farm house tables. In saying that, my glue lines are usually really close but sometimes has 1/32 inch or so lips even after using dominos for alignment. which plane do you all think would be best for getting that knocked down and flat? would a number 7 be my best bet in this instance?


14 replies so far

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jonah

1470 posts in 3137 days


#1 posted 11-17-2017 03:21 PM

I’m assuming you mean the glueup for the table top. If that is the case, then really any plane from smoothing to jointer (#3 & #4 to #7 & #8) could do just fine smoothing out that lip. I’d probably lean on a well tuned smoothing #4 to cut down on any sanding afterward. Take a light cut and work across the lip slightly.

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GR8HUNTER

2965 posts in 551 days


#2 posted 11-17-2017 03:26 PM

SCRAPER :<))

-- Tony Reinholds,Pa. REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

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buckbuster31

203 posts in 354 days


#3 posted 11-17-2017 03:33 PM

I agree about the scraper, but id be dag gum…I cant sharpen the dang things!!!!!

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Bill White

4807 posts in 3799 days


#4 posted 11-17-2017 03:36 PM

I often use a #80 scraper. Not difficult to sharpen or use.
Set to iron’s edge to 45* and turn a very slight burr.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

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Tim

3682 posts in 1800 days


#5 posted 11-17-2017 04:18 PM

We can get you up and running sharpening the scraper if you want. Get the faces flat, file the edge 90 degrees for a card scraper, then draw file it then get a decent burnisher with a drop of oil on it go several passes at 90 degrees then slowly start angling down to each side for several passes until you get the hook angle you want. There are lots of good youtube videos on it and some differences in methods. For a #80, like Bill said, and I think some people don’t put a hook at all on them.

The Hock burnisher without a handle is a really good deal and is very hard and well polished.

A #4 is a good plane, but unless you’ve got all the grain on the different pieces of wood going the same way you can be asking for tearout when planing the joints. That’s why the scraper recommendations.

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bandit571

18631 posts in 2521 days


#6 posted 11-17-2017 05:11 PM

Perhaps a #5 jack plane? Shallow camber to the iron. Stay on the “high” side of the joints, and follow the grain.

Keep the heel on the lower side, and follow the joint at a slight angle, with the toe almost floating above the high side’s field. The camber will keep the plane from digging into the low side, just in case the grain goes the wrong way.

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

View RustyHacksaw's profile

RustyHacksaw

129 posts in 1102 days


#7 posted 11-17-2017 05:27 PM

I would use a bench plane… Scrapers do not work as well in pine, which I assume you are using for large farm tables.

A #7 would be the easiest, then a #5, then a #4. Any of the 3 would do great for you.

The advantage of scrapers is grain direction and tearout are relatively non important. But in Pine, a sharp bench plane with tight chipbreaker won’t tearout.

*If your tables are not from pine, then disregard what I’m saying and learn to sharpen the scraper best option.

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JCamp

476 posts in 389 days


#8 posted 11-17-2017 07:03 PM

“I agree about the scraper, but id be dag gum…I cant sharpen the dang things!!!!!”

Sounds odd but get a pack of normal razor blades and use them lik a mini scraper. When they get dull trash them

-- Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with all thy might

View buckbuster31's profile

buckbuster31

203 posts in 354 days


#9 posted 11-17-2017 07:42 PM

no, definitely not using pine. mostly red oak….but regardless all hardwood


I would use a bench plane… Scrapers do not work as well in pine, which I assume you are using for large farm tables.

A #7 would be the easiest, then a #5, then a #4. Any of the 3 would do great for you.

The advantage of scrapers is grain direction and tearout are relatively non important. But in Pine, a sharp bench plane with tight chipbreaker won t tearout.

*If your tables are not from pine, then disregard what I m saying and learn to sharpen the scraper best option.

- RustyHacksaw


View AUswimKC's profile

AUswimKC

32 posts in 1786 days


#10 posted 11-17-2017 11:08 PM

I’ll get panned for this, but a new Straight out of the box plane, a LV LA Jack. The balance is far batter than anything. Plus a toothing blade if needed

View ColonelTravis's profile

ColonelTravis

1681 posts in 1732 days


#11 posted 11-18-2017 03:16 AM

The issue with a LA jack for something as large as a farm table made from red oak – tearout problems. If the grain in the entire table is uniform and going in the same direction, fine. I doubt you’re building them like that. I love my LA jack but I wouldn’t use it to refine a large red oak table.

With oak you will run into tearout potential with any bench plane, but a LA jack can be ruthless.

1/32” is not that much, I’m guessing you don’t use hand tools primarily to build the tables. Just curious why do you want to use a hand plane vs., say, an orbital sander?

View Don W's profile

Don W

18523 posts in 2406 days


#12 posted 11-19-2017 01:40 PM

I’d use a #4 or #4 1/2. I’d have two set up. One with a very slight camber and one with just the edges rolled.

Buy one and try it. You’ll probably wind up with several in the end anyhow, but if you don’t like it, they are an easy resell.

-- http://timetestedtools.net - Collecting is an investment in the past, and the future.

View harrison17's profile

harrison17

22 posts in 79 days


#13 posted 11-20-2017 03:10 PM



I ll get panned for this, but a new Straight out of the box plane, a LV LA Jack. The balance is far batter than anything. Plus a toothing blade if needed

- AUswimKC


The issue with a LA jack for something as large as a farm table made from red oak – tearout problems. If the grain in the entire table is uniform and going in the same direction, fine. I doubt you re building them like that. I love my LA jack but I wouldn t use it to refine a large red oak table.

With oak you will run into tearout potential with any bench plane, but a LA jack can be ruthless.

1/32” is not that much, I m guessing you don t use hand tools primarily to build the tables. Just curious why do you want to use a hand plane vs., say, an orbital sander?

- ColonelTravis

You could get the low angle jack with a 50 degree iron. That would eliminate tearout most likely and with that little material to remove it wouldn’t be very difficult to push. I’d rather plane than sand any day. I think a bevel up smoother with the higher angle iron would be better though. The tables might not be flat enough for a longer plane. This is a finishing step so you want it to ride the highs and lows to get all of the lip removed instead of skipping over the low spots.

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TheFridge

8324 posts in 1324 days


#14 posted 11-20-2017 05:09 PM

I frequently use a 2 for this kinda work but a 4 will work as well.

I’m gonna go against the grain and say stay with something that has a cap iron. The only thing good about a bevel up bench plane to me is versatility by switching irons. I’d rather sink money into a couple different sized vintage bench planes than 1 new bevel up plane with different irons.

Just my thoughts.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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