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Best Lube for Radial Arm Saw

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Forum topic by drsongs posted 02-22-2011 05:13 AM 6233 views 0 times favorited 25 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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drsongs

43 posts in 2114 days


02-22-2011 05:13 AM

Topic tags/keywords: lube radial arm saw

There’s been an ongoing post on the Ward’s Powr-Kraft model TPC-2610 Radial arm saw here: http://lumberjocks.com/topics/1939 that I got a lot of help from. Now that I have the saw apart and cleaned up I’m looking for suggestions on what’s the best lube for the column. I have some Heavy Duty Bearing Grease but I’m thinking there’s probably something better. Ideas?
Thanks

-- Respect your tools so you keep all your fingers to play guitar... and Thank God daily.


25 replies so far

View David Kirtley's profile

David Kirtley

1286 posts in 2459 days


#1 posted 02-22-2011 06:35 AM

I would wax it. The grease would tend to pick up stuff.

-- Woodworking shouldn't cost a fortune: http://lowbudgetwoodworker.blogspot.com/

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

4450 posts in 3422 days


#2 posted 02-22-2011 05:53 PM

Just put some oil on it, keep it wiped down, and use it. My 1978 RAS column looks like new with only this treatment. KISS.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

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teejk

1215 posts in 2146 days


#3 posted 02-22-2011 07:33 PM

dr…given the fact that you went through great pains to get it freed, I would definitely opt for some grease when you reassemble. Your axle grease will probably work but get a bit stiff in cold weather. How about a white lithium that they use for garage door openers?

a thin coat at the bottom and probably half-way up of the moveable shaft should suffice (of course after a good cleaning with wet/dry sandpaper followed by solvent…I tend to use spray on carb cleaner like Gumout). wipe off any excess grease once you have “bottomed out”.

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drsongs

43 posts in 2114 days


#4 posted 02-22-2011 08:30 PM

I did a search online and the majority recommendation seems to be spray on dry teflon.

-- Respect your tools so you keep all your fingers to play guitar... and Thank God daily.

View NBeener's profile

NBeener

4808 posts in 2635 days


#5 posted 02-22-2011 08:33 PM

That’s what I’ve started using … on the one that I’m rebuilding.

Brand name: Super-Lube.

There’s a topic, in bicycle mechanics (I’m a hobbyist, there, too). People get religious about chain lube.

But … after 20yrs of wrenching bikes … my position is simple: keep it reasonably clean, and reasonably well lubricated.

Grease will tend to collect dust. Dry lubes are cleaner than wet lubes. Tri-Flow is good stuff (and smells good, too !).

And … squawk though some may … while it is NOT the best lubricant in the world … WD-40 IS—chemically—at its heart—a lubricant (and a water displacer, AND a degreaser/solvent), so … while you usually have to re-apply it more often than some other lubes … most people have it on hand, already, and it DOES reduce friction.

There. I said it :-p

-- -- Neil

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drsongs

43 posts in 2114 days


#6 posted 02-22-2011 11:25 PM

Turns out we have some Tri Flow here at work – as I was reading the label I saw that it’s made by Sherwin Williams… The funny thing there is… my daughter works for Sherwin Williams! So looks like I’m set.
Thanks for all the help.
NB got your other posts as well thanks. I have some PB in the garage but haven’t needed it on any bolts – the only problem I had was with the column being frozen up. I saw in another forum a few people saying not to use silicone based lubes in the shop not exactly sure why but they said it causes problems ?? Maybe I’ll have to search that again and ask what for?

-- Respect your tools so you keep all your fingers to play guitar... and Thank God daily.

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teejk

1215 posts in 2146 days


#7 posted 02-22-2011 11:52 PM

nbeener…grease will attract dust but the moveable column on a properly fitted RAS will never find it to get in the way and even if it did, it is a shop rag wipe.

the guy had to employ a hydraulic press to free it! silicone spray ain’t going to cut it, especially if it sits for awhile. any tool I have ever bought had grease on it (ugly stuff since it is now coming from China and the lube smells like fish). A tube of white lithium costs nothing. buy it meant for garage doors and you’ll get something akin to a small tube of toothpaste.

View David Kirtley's profile

David Kirtley

1286 posts in 2459 days


#8 posted 02-23-2011 12:40 AM

Silicone is nasty as well for finishing. I would keep it as far away from woodworking tools as possible.

-- Woodworking shouldn't cost a fortune: http://lowbudgetwoodworker.blogspot.com/

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Grandpa

3256 posts in 2137 days


#9 posted 02-23-2011 12:50 AM

I like things clean and waxed. I have been experimenting with Slip-it from Rocklers. This is recommended for many things including your saw tables. I would try Slip-it.

View NBeener's profile

NBeener

4808 posts in 2635 days


#10 posted 02-23-2011 12:51 AM

Right. Silicon can prevent your wood from taking a finish.

teejk: I was assuming … maybe incorrectly … that the lubrication question was about … generally lubricating an RAS, rather than breaking free the really stuck stuff.

And … yeah … the stick of white lithium grease is great for woodworking machines.

Incidentally, I used a fair amount of synthetic (bike) grease as I was putting the pieces back on mine, including the mating surface between the yoke and the motor carriage. If it’s NOT in a high-dust area, then … good grease is a good friend.

I actually agree with you: if you can SEE the part we’re talking about, then you can keep the sawdust from building up in the first place. It is a bit harder for internal workings of, say, a table saw—unless you can easily access it, to blow it out with an air hose.

Big fan of grease and anti-seize.

Unless it’s specified that it’s supposed to be ‘dry’ (not too common), I don’t put a fastener in, dry …. ever. It’s just a question of what it gets, on it.

-- -- Neil

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drsongs

43 posts in 2114 days


#11 posted 02-25-2011 06:59 PM

So I got it back together and used the TRI Flow and it works great. Now I need to find a crank I can adapt to it.
Funny thing… I went to the local Restore (Habitat for Humanity) yesterday and they just got in the day before the exact saw that I have, a Ward’s Powr-Kraft TPC-2610 – only $95.00. It’s in great shape and has all the pieces (I was coveting the column crank & the index lock handle). As you can see in the picture I had to put a new piece on the back part of the table it was completely gone, one day I’ll make a new table for it but right now it’s doing what I need it to. Made pretty quick work of the 4×4’s I cut down as corner blocks for the raised bed boxes I’m making for our new garden this year. Can’t go to fast though or it will bind up. Not sure if there’s more power to be had or if that’s just what it’s got. Don’t think I want to get into the motor to change the brushes unless it becomes absolutely necessary. Or I guess some have a clutch adjustment haven’t got that far yet. Right now It’s doing what I need so I’ll leave that for later.

-- Respect your tools so you keep all your fingers to play guitar... and Thank God daily.

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teejk

1215 posts in 2146 days


#12 posted 02-25-2011 08:12 PM

looking good! looks almost like my old Craftsman with some differences on the arm handle location and a few knobs in the front that I don’t have.

the back piece on the Craftsman is only a narrow strip (maybe 3”???) that exactly matched the width of the front table. Only purpose is to be able to pinch the fence.

looks like you have a fine toothed blade on it. a general purpose 40 toother (<$20 at a big box store) might help with the bog-down problem if you don’t want to get into the motor brushes while you continue your build out (and you save your existing blade for the future).

I would get a piece of 1/8” or 1/4” hardboard or mdf on the top (sacrificial) and probably go with a bit higher fence.

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drsongs

43 posts in 2114 days


#13 posted 02-25-2011 08:41 PM

Ya – higher fence is probably a good idea. On this saw the back portion of the table including the fence is about 9 1/2”. I just had to piece something in there because it was missing. Eventually I’ll make a total new table.
The blade is a carbide tipped 60 tooth combination blade I got at a local place called the Bargain Outlet $7.00 I’ll look and see I’m sure he has a 40 tooth as well. Right now we got snow coming down and I’m only at 1000 ft. in town is about 2700 ft. and pretty much shut down so it’ll be next week before I can get in to check it out.

-- Respect your tools so you keep all your fingers to play guitar... and Thank God daily.

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

115202 posts in 3039 days


#14 posted 02-25-2011 08:54 PM

You need a dry lubricant not any type of grease or any with silicon in it. I use graphite , you can buy it as a router bearing lubricant or a speedometer cable lubricant.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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teejk

1215 posts in 2146 days


#15 posted 02-25-2011 10:00 PM

$7 for a 60 tooth carbide???? nuf said there! I would top the front table before I replaced it (you have the prototype of MDF there and it will last forever if you put a wear level on top).

enjoy your snow and the global warming (forecast here is 7F for tonight…we’re going hunting for that ground-hog next week if it doesn’t warm up…after we dispatch it, we’re going for ALGORE).

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