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Forum topic by Karda posted 11-16-2017 05:08 AM 416 views 0 times favorited 5 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Karda

807 posts in 388 days


11-16-2017 05:08 AM

Hi, i used my spindle gouge for the first time in awhile and the cut was crapy. I was turning at 2200 RPM and the cut was rough. and lumpy, I had to go over it with a skew to smooth it out, iss that normal or am I doing something wrong. I think the grind is 40 degrees


5 replies so far

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

2186 posts in 1969 days


#1 posted 11-16-2017 11:35 AM

Set your gouge on the tool rest where bevel of tool is rubbing the blank and not cutting and slowly raise the tool until it starts to cut. Then move your body & tool in direction of the cut you will get clean shavings and smooth surface.

Kind of like learning to drive a standard shift car you slowly raise your foot off the clutch letting the transmission engage the engine but in turning you don’t take your hands off, you move with the tool.

Forcing the cut not bevel riding will dull the tool and give you bumps or spirals along the blank.
Lot of folks forget a clean cut starts with their stance, body movement, and tool grip.

Stance starts with feet comfortably shoulder width apart to start. You will learn to shift your weight from one foot to the other and when to move your feet if require move with the rest of your body while turning one foot at a time.

Tool grip is using more than your hands, but don’t hold the tool is death grip. Get a comfortable grip, for short tool handle try using forearm support long tool handle some you combination of forearm and torso support, some just use their torso. Everyone is built different, some folks use their belt line or little higher or lower on their bodies.

Guys like Raffin and Stuart Batty and others have excellent videos showing and explaining all what have said here. Just hit You-Tube.

-- Bill

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LeeMills

458 posts in 1136 days


#2 posted 11-16-2017 01:55 PM

I agree with Bill on the points he made.
The cuts being “rough and lumpy” could be several things.
You do not so give the diameter of the piece. For 1.5 – 2” spindles I use a speed like you (about 2200). If you have a smaller diameter like a pen blank you probably want to go up to 3000+.
By rough is it a cut which has bumps or is it grain tear out?
Stuart Batty has very good videos at Vimeo. He has three on stance and the last one (alphabetical listing) is Tool Marks which discusses rpm and tool feed rate and shows the “bumps”.
https://vimeo.com/woodturning/videos/sort:alphabetical/format:thumbnail
I do not know how you sharpen. My gouges are off the grinder but my skews are honed so the skews are much sharper by comparison.

-- We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them. Albert Einstein

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Karda

807 posts in 388 days


#3 posted 11-17-2017 12:07 AM

by rough I mean its not smooth, the surface is kinda like rough leather and very fine spirals, i can see each individual cur as it is made. the black i am referring to is about 2” maple, I turned it down for a tool handle. I shaped with a spindle gouge and smoothed with a roughing gouge. I know i shouldn’t have to do that, I’ll try 3000, haven’t had the guts to turn that high yet I’ll check out the videos forgot about them. I use this jig and a belt sander with a platform to set the jig in. I cut a dowel to 40 degrees and inserted in the jig and marked the platform where the jig pivot point contacted the rest. It works okay but could i set it more accurately

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LeeMills

458 posts in 1136 days


#4 posted 11-17-2017 01:36 AM

JMHO so have a box of salt ready.
What you describe is in the last video by Stuart Batty… at least my from my view.
Based on the size you should not need to go to 3,000 .. do what you feel comfortable with. A slower rpm and slower feed rate achieves the same.
When I went to hard wood (like hard maple) from softer woods (like walnut) the difference was great. Yes walnut is a hard wood but….
Going from dry walnut to dry ash (baseball bat sections) was a new lesson again.
Play safe my friend.

-- We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them. Albert Einstein

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Karda

807 posts in 388 days


#5 posted 11-17-2017 01:50 AM

ok I tried rubbing thje bevel, that seed to work, I’ll know better when i get a chance to turn thanks

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