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Sharpie water resistance???

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Forum topic by Scott Gilroy posted 02-21-2011 08:10 PM 4180 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Scott Gilroy

45 posts in 2466 days


02-21-2011 08:10 PM

I have engraved some cutting boards and infilled the carving with a black sharpie for enhanced definition. It looks good. I’ll be posting pix soon. However, I am concerned about the water resistance of the marker. The boards will be wiped with mild soap and damp cloth, but I’m wondering about possible bleeding of the ink. I know it’s called “permanent”, but it will bleed if on clothing that is washed. The board is finished with multiple coats of mineral oil, then topped with a few coats of Howard’s oil/wax conditioner. Anyone have any experience with this?

As usual…Thanks!

-- Scott


6 replies so far

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Dan

3630 posts in 2345 days


#1 posted 02-21-2011 08:15 PM

The marker ink WILL bleed when it gets wet. It will bleed out all over the place and make a big mess. Trust me!

Your best bet would be to go over it with some kind of water proof paint using either a paint pen or very fine tipped brush..

-- Dan - "Collector of Hand Planes"

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Dan

3630 posts in 2345 days


#2 posted 02-21-2011 08:17 PM

I forgot to add that the ink will not only bleed out when wet but it will quickly settle and dry into the surrounding area and at that point you will have to sand it out.

-- Dan - "Collector of Hand Planes"

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DLCW

530 posts in 2119 days


#3 posted 02-22-2011 02:05 AM

The marker will bleed. The worst part is it will bleed in to the surrounding grain and you will no longer have crisp carving detail. I would take a look at paints that are made for outdoor signs (One Shot) or another option is printer ink. I use this for outdoor cedar signs. It is 100% waterproof. I get mine from Grainger.

http://www.grainger.com/Grainger/wwg/search.shtml?searchQuery=ink&op=search&Ntt=ink&N=0&sst=subset

-- Don, Diamond Lake Custom Woodworks - http://www.dlwoodworks.com - "If you make something idiot proof, all they do is make a better idiot"

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Kindlingmaker

2656 posts in 2991 days


#4 posted 02-22-2011 07:31 AM

Go to the Sharpie Pen web site and you will find a lot of information about their pens like they ARE NOT permanant. On wood, with sunlight, they may last 3 months. If you use an ink, use India Ink it is as forever as you can get.

-- Never board, always knotty, lots of growth rings

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Scott Gilroy

45 posts in 2466 days


#5 posted 02-23-2011 08:44 AM

thanks for the responses. I was able to go over the carving to get rid of the ink. Now i just need to use the best method to infill the thin carving lines.
thanks again.

-- Scott

View childress's profile

childress

841 posts in 3006 days


#6 posted 02-23-2011 06:49 PM

or what about getting a pen torch and burn the carving? Then sand the surface to get any burn marks off the regular surface and your left with a burnt carving. Kinda how the laser engravers do it.

-- Childress Woodworks

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