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Fixing Runs in Shellac Seal Coat over GF Gel Stain

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Forum topic by Dustin posted 11-15-2017 01:36 PM 362 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Dustin

404 posts in 575 days


11-15-2017 01:36 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question finishing

So, I’m coming up on the very end of a project (standing desk), and getting ready to apply the topcoat of wipe-on poly tonight. Initially, I used a 1# cut of SealCoat of this table top, lightly sanded, then applied General Finishes Georgian Cherry gel stain. After letting that set for 24 hours, I applied 2 coats of SealCoat at a 2# cut. Unfortunately, I’m pretty inexperienced with shellac, and didn’t pay enough attention to the underside of the top I was finishing, leaving me with a few runs/bubbles around the edges of the table top. I’ve looked at other suggestions for how to remove these runs, such as lightly rubbing with DNA, but I found that this also removes the stain (maybe because it was layered over a wash coat?). If it weren’t for the stain, I’d proceed with this method and simply wipe on a thinner cut in those spots to build it back up.

I’m being VERY careful sanding these spots with 220, as it’s incredibly easy to sand through the coats and the stain, but can’t get them “invisible”. My question is, if these spots are only slightly raised, say < .01”, will it blend together when I wipe on the poly? Should I sand as far as practical, then wipe on a thinner cut of shellac?

Thanks in advance!

-- "Ladies, if your husband says he'll get to it, he'll get to it. No need to remind him about it every 6 months."


9 replies so far

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

116561 posts in 3412 days


#1 posted 11-15-2017 01:46 PM

I would say apply 2 more coats of seal coat let dry thoroughly then use a straight edge razor blade and lightly scrape the runs, then sand, you’re better off with more material to scrape and sand.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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CharlesNeil

2143 posts in 3705 days


#2 posted 11-15-2017 02:02 PM

a1Jim has it right…..Sanding will take the color off around the run, you could use a little DNA and try to get some of the top of the run, but if you try to work down flush your again going to cut the shellac off the surrounding areas and probably the color as well…

add shellac, scrape as good as possible , add ore shellac , and when dry sand carefully

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a1Jim

116561 posts in 3412 days


#3 posted 11-15-2017 02:04 PM

I have it right because I learned that technique from you, Charles.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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a1Jim

116561 posts in 3412 days


#4 posted 11-15-2017 02:05 PM

oops double post

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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Dustin

404 posts in 575 days


#5 posted 11-15-2017 02:10 PM



I would say apply 2 more coats of seal coat let dry thoroughly then use a straight edge razor blade and lightly scrape the runs, then sand, you re better off with more material to scrape and sand.

- a1Jim

Much obliged, Jim! I’m trying to deliver this Friday evening, but with the dry/recoat time of the shellac and wipe-on poly, I think I should be ok with this approach (it won’t be used until next week). I’m a big fan of “the simplest solution is often the best”, but have a little trouble finding them myself!

-- "Ladies, if your husband says he'll get to it, he'll get to it. No need to remind him about it every 6 months."

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Dustin

404 posts in 575 days


#6 posted 11-15-2017 02:11 PM



a1Jim has it right…..Sanding will take the color off around the run, you could use a little DNA and try to get some of the top of the run, but if you try to work down flush your again going to cut the shellac off the surrounding areas and probably the color as well…

add shellac, scrape as good as possible , add ore shellac , and when dry sand carefully

- CharlesNeil

Thanks for chiming in, Charles. I’ve read enough of yours and Jim’s posts to know I’m in good hands.

-- "Ladies, if your husband says he'll get to it, he'll get to it. No need to remind him about it every 6 months."

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Dustin

404 posts in 575 days


#7 posted 11-15-2017 02:17 PM

I suppose this is something to chalk up as a lesson learned about paying closer attention to possible runs down the edges (oddly enough, my edges themselves look pretty nice). Happy to get the advice, though. I’m pretty blown away with the look of the shellac, and definitely want to keep at it in order to use it in future projects.

-- "Ladies, if your husband says he'll get to it, he'll get to it. No need to remind him about it every 6 months."

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

1423 posts in 1824 days


#8 posted 11-19-2017 12:56 AM

Dustin- what is the reason for the shellac in the 1st place? You dont say the wood type, but maybe as a blotch control, for which it is a substandard choice. The poly top coat will provide chatoyance or pop, so Im not seeing the need for the step that caused problems.

View Dark_Lightning's profile

Dark_Lightning

2916 posts in 2943 days


#9 posted 11-19-2017 03:14 AM

For future reference, you can go to your local paint store and get a tool that is used for planing runs out of paint. Works a treat on any finish. Just be sure that the finish is completely dry.

I personally spray shellac and lacquer, because it is really tough to get either of them to be completely run-free with a brush.

-- Random Orbital Nailer

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