LumberJocks

Used Table Saw - What to look for?

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by jdon88 posted 1278 days ago 4380 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View jdon88's profile

jdon88

19 posts in 1279 days


1278 days ago

Hello all, my first post here. I’m just getting started in the woodworking hobby and am considering my first major piece of equipment to buy – a used table saw. I saw lots of low priced Craftsman saws on CL and was tempted to look but am trying not to. I’m going to check out an older Grizzly G1022 tomorrow, its about 15 yrs old and seller is asking $375. At first I thought that was a good price, about half of what a comparable new Grizzly costs. But when I searched the net and found this site there were several posts about people buying a 1022 for $100. or so, doesn’t sound like my deal is so good anymore. The seller did say that the original 1.5 hp motor was replaced with a 2hp 220V along with a heavy duty switch. Also included is a dado blade set. Does a newer motor make the saw more valuable? What should I look for when I inspect it? So far I’m just planning to bring a straightedge to check the table for flatness and start it to see if the motor makes any odd noises. He said its heavy, about 240 lbs. I only plan on buying a tablesaw once and hope that it will last 20 years without major issues. I liked the grizzly G0444 that we used in the woodworking class I took. Thanks for any help you can give me.


13 replies so far

View artthruwood's profile

artthruwood

28 posts in 1388 days


#1 posted 1278 days ago

I have tons of great experience with grizzly machines and that price seems good if its in working and usable condition.
my biggest oppinion on this is to look for an older powermatic. at my shop we have an older powermatic cabinet saw and I personaly choose to use one over our sawstop. when they say “the gold standard” they arent kidding

-- slowing down with bring you greater speed then going fast

View tomcat's profile

tomcat

23 posts in 1685 days


#2 posted 1278 days ago

The April issue of Fine Woodworking #218 has an artcle on what to look for when buying used woodworking machines.

-- Tom, Northwest Wisconsin

View NBeener's profile

NBeener

4806 posts in 1800 days


#3 posted 1278 days ago

I 2nd what Tom just said. That’s what I was going to recommend, and it’s a GREAT article.

-- -- Neil

View jdon88's profile

jdon88

19 posts in 1279 days


#4 posted 1278 days ago

That is a good article, perfect timing and thanks for the info. And yes, I do like to get my hands dirty…some of my other hobbies are rebuilding old dirt bikes and motors.

View Planeman40's profile

Planeman40

470 posts in 1387 days


#5 posted 1278 days ago

One caveat is be careful that the saw is NOT three phase.

Three phase is only available in industrial areas and although there is such a thing as a phase converter (converts three phase to single phase) they are relatively expensive and tricky to match to the intended use. Only purchase single phase. 220 volt single phase is O.K. however you will most likely have to run a special line from your home power box to your shop for this. 220 volts also offers a bit more power for the same size motor over 110 volts.

Other than that, as long as all castings are in good condition – no cracks or breaks – and all parts are there in reasonably good condition You should be O.K. Bearings can be replaced with off-the-shelf replacements and rust can be removed if not pitted. My rule of thumb regarding pricing is if the machine is in very good condition it is worth about one half of a comparable new machine (not necessarily an identical machine). As the condition of the used machine diminishes from very good condition the price goes down accordingly.

Be careful about thinking you can get replacement parts for an old machine. I have a Delta machine I bought new about 30 years ago and now I need some parts and Delta doesn’t have them. I will have to machine new ones from scratch. Fortunately I have a metal lathe and mill and the capability to do so, however it will be a bother.

Good luck!

Planeman

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

2603 posts in 1677 days


#6 posted 1278 days ago

It also depends on what you want to do with the saw. Maybe you don’t exactly know the answer to that question yet, but do you see yourself cutting a lot of thicker, heavier stock, or mostly sticking with plywood and thinner stock such as 4/4? It also depends on the room you have for the saw, or the lack thereof. Will you need to move it often, or will it be planted somewhere once it’s in your shop?

Maybe you know all the answers to those questions and now you’re on to what saw to buy to meet those criteria?

Start with what you’re planning to use the saw for, then go from there. For instance, if you’re going to be working with a lot of 8/4-12/4 stock, you probably don’t want to get a 110v,1.75-HP saw.

Definitely read the article recommended above and keep us posted.

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

View jdon88's profile

jdon88

19 posts in 1279 days


#7 posted 1276 days ago

Thanks for the info. I’m not sure what I’ll be using the saw for yet so I want to get enough saw to handle anything I might need in the future. The woodworking instructor I had suggested nothing smaller than 2 HP 220V so that is what I’m looking for. I’d also want to make it mobile since I’ll be sharing garage space with cars, auto tools, etc. The garage is new with 100 amp service and several 30 amp 220 lines ran, I think that os enough to run a 220V saw? I don’t want to get an obsolete machine, just something old enough to be less costly than new. Maybe I’m wrong but weren’t the older machines made better with more metal parts than todays plastic Chine made machines? I’m also wondering what era machine to look for, something from the 90’s and newer maybe? I did look at the Grizzly that I mentioned in the original post but it had not been used in 5+ years, had a good amount of rust, squeaky adjustments, and the seller wouldn’t budge on price so I walked and will keep looking.

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

2603 posts in 1677 days


#8 posted 1276 days ago

You should have more than enough power there to handle pretty much any of the 220v saws. Heck, you should be able to run several tools at 220v at once, if you wanted to on just one 30-amp circuit (such as a dust collector wired for 220v).

Several saws in the 3HP, 220v range draw about 13-amps, and if I remember correctly, I think my Delta dust collector when it was wired for 220v drew 9-amps?

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

View Planeman40's profile

Planeman40

470 posts in 1387 days


#9 posted 1276 days ago

_”I’m also wondering what era machine to look for, something from the 90’s and newer maybe?”

Good woodworking machines are almost timeless. If it were me I would consider anything from about 1970 onward. Chinese machines have only reached reasonably good quality control in the past 10 years or so. Japanese and Taiwan machines reached reasonably good quality control around 1980 or so. Prior to that I would stick to American made or European made. However European machinery is rare here in the USA. Most American made light industrial machines you will run into will be Delta and Powermatic and both are excellent. Delta did make some machines for home or contractor use that are lighter than the industrial line however they were good machines if more lightly built. There are other good American makes that are old that are excellent. I have a Walker-Turner 14” bandsaw built in the 1940s that is all cast iron including the base and even today these are sought after due to their heavy solid construction. I love it and wouldn’t part with it!

Planeman

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

5417 posts in 2002 days


#10 posted 1276 days ago

$375 is way too much for a used G1022 IMHO. IIRC, the G1022SM sold for less than that new, had steel wings, a questionable fence, and no height locking mechanism for the blade. The G1022Z or a ProZ (something like that), came with a stock 2hp motor, webbed cast iron wings, and a Shop Fox Classic fence….$375 would even be high for that model used. A new 2hp motor adds some value, but doesn’t compensate for the shortcomings of the stock steel fence on the original 1022 (if that’s what’s on there). With good alignment and good blade selection, a 120v 1.5hp saw should be able to handle the vast majority of what a hobbiest needs to cut.

I’d definitely be inclined to keep looking unless he’s upgraded the fence, and is willing to drop the price a lot.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View jdon88's profile

jdon88

19 posts in 1279 days


#11 posted 1276 days ago

yeah, it had the stock fence which was another negative. It did have cast iron wings and locking height adjustment, that was something I had heard about this model didn’t have. maybe he changed it somehow? I saw another model 1022 for sale on CL for $200 with 1.5 HP motor. The owners manual for model 1022 shows that they came with 1.5 or 2 hp motors, would it be hard to upgrade a 1.5 HP to a 2HP? I’ll have to look into that, and how much a good motor would cost. I’m in no hurry and I’m not just looking at Grizzly. I like the idea of old american made equipment…

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

2603 posts in 1677 days


#12 posted 1276 days ago

Kind of depends on what your budget is as well. I’m not suggesting you go get something large and more than you might want to spend (whatever that amount is), but I have seen older Delta Unisaws on Craigslist here in Denver recently for as little as $600, including the fence, etc. in good working condition. That would certainly be a saw that should handle whatever you’re likely to ask of it. With that being said, you’d have to build some sort of rolling platform or something similar for it to sit on. How much room do you have for the saw, or better put, how big of a footprint can it take up?

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

View Loren's profile

Loren

7393 posts in 2274 days


#13 posted 1276 days ago

My advice is don’t plan on buying one table saw for the rest of
your life.

Your needs and desires will change. Buy what’s reasonable in
terms of value to you and of good quality for the money. You can
always upgrade as you get to know more about the capabilities
(and weaknesses) of American-style table saws for the kind of
woodworking you want to do.

I own mostly machinery made prior to 1950 right now. That’s just
a funny preference of mine I guess. I’ve owned newer stuff but
I just like the old stuff. They tend to be solid and straightforward
in design and I don’t mind working on the machines.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase